Author Topic: Electronic-Optronic Technician ( EO Tech )  (Read 12865 times)

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Offline mariomike

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Re: All things EO Tech (merged)
« Reply #50 on: February 11, 2018, 14:30:12 »
e: unfortunately your post was moved into a thread that is half outdated eo tech information and half EO tech ( the scope brand, not the trade ) theory crafting. I would send sidemout a PM as this thread is basically no man's land lol.

We use this Sticky as a guideline when merging Original Posts with existing mega-threads.

Necroposting - Not always a bad idea
https://milnet.ca/forums/index.php/topic,87278.0.html

« Last Edit: February 11, 2018, 15:39:47 by mariomike »

Offline sidemount

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Re: All things EO Tech (merged)
« Reply #51 on: February 11, 2018, 14:54:30 »
Pretty much any post that has to do specifically with an EO tech sight really has no place in this thread as its supposed to be about the EO tech occupation

That being said, like EpicBeardedMan has said, feel free to shoot me a pm with any questions you have that are EO related. I've been an EO tech for 12 years before jumping ship to the Officer world recently.

Spyder, I'll try and answer your questions as best as possible.

Training is all done in borden now. EO techs used to do POET but some of it was geared more towards the sigs side of the house. So now POET is all integrated into the QL3/DP1 course. You start out doing an RCEME common course which teaches you the history of the corps along with doing some mobile repair team drills and responding to repair recovery request. You also do some tools training as well.

After that you will move onto the EO tech specific course. You will learn AC/DC and a bunch of other electronic theory. You will do some soldering. You will do a lot of optical theory and practical work on artillery sights. You will also do some power distribution. You will then put it all together while working on the turret of the LAVIII, and the surveillance system of the Coyote/TAPV. I believe there is some M777 and RWS stuff but I can't remember. It is a very academic course, not very heavy on Army stuff besides morning PT and marching to and from the barracks to the school. There are room inspections every so often but nothing crazy.

After the course you get posted to one of the main Army bases Service Battalion to do a year or so on the job training. During that time you will work at various different pieces of kit. Afterwards you will go back to borden for QL5/DP2 which I think is advance optics, and some more M777 stuff and some more in depth electronics.
Afterwards you go back to your base and will likely get posted to a first line unit. first line units are maintenance at places like infantry/armoured/artillery units.
Most of the time that these guys go to the field, maintenance pers will deploy with them. I've spent lots of time out on the line with the artillery and at gun camps with the LAVs.

Other specialty courses include leopard tank and now the UAV drones.

Best part of the job for me would be the tech work at a first line unit. Gives you the opportunity to think and fix problems for users and get their equipment up and running when they need it. Worst part can be the paperwork and bureaucracy that seems to pop up everywhere in the Army these days. That and last minute work that needs to be done because someone planned very piss poorly.

Average day in garrison for me when I was still in Pet was PT every morning, then to the shop and fix stuff that needed to be fixed.

I think that's about it. Like I said, shoot me a PM if you have any other questions.



Leadership is solving problems. The day soldiers stop bringing you their problems is the day you have stopped leading them. They have either lost confidence that you can help or concluded you do not care. Either case is a failure of leadership. - Colin Powell

Offline mariomike

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Re: All things EO Tech (merged)
« Reply #52 on: February 11, 2018, 15:08:24 »
Pretty much any post that has to do specifically with an EO tech sight really has no place in this thread as its supposed to be about the EO tech occupation

EO Tech sight discussion here,

EO Tech sight
https://army.ca/forums/index.php/topic,18288.msg92391.html#msg92391

The original title was, "All things EO Tech ( merged )". Hopefully, separation of the trade and sight discussions will help.

« Last Edit: February 11, 2018, 16:32:33 by mariomike »

Offline sidemount

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Re: All things EO Tech (merged)
« Reply #53 on: February 11, 2018, 16:40:15 »
EO Tech sight discussion here,

EO Tech sight
https://army.ca/forums/index.php/topic,18288.msg92391.html#msg92391

The original title was, "All things EO Tech ( merged )". Hopefully, separation of the trade and sight discussions will help.

Should be good, thanks!
Leadership is solving problems. The day soldiers stop bringing you their problems is the day you have stopped leading them. They have either lost confidence that you can help or concluded you do not care. Either case is a failure of leadership. - Colin Powell

Offline mariomike

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Re: All things EO Tech (merged)
« Reply #54 on: February 11, 2018, 16:42:29 »
Should be good, thanks!

My pleasure!  :)

Offline brandon_sage92

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Electronic-Optonics Technician Re-Muster
« Reply #55 on: February 09, 2019, 19:24:53 »
Hello there! I was wondering if there were any EO techs here that would be willing to answer some questions.

A little about me: I'm currently serving in the RCN  as a Marine Technician, Electrical Branch. I'm looking for a bit of insight into the world of EO techs, the ease of a VOT into the trade ( PLAR through what I believe is called POET portion of the QL3 and progression to QL5 with past experience ) and future postings.

I'm thinking of VOTing into the trade but wish to have some lingering questions answered before I make my decision.

Thanks in advance!
 


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Offline sidemount

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Re: Electronic-Optronic Technician ( EO Tech )
« Reply #56 on: February 09, 2019, 19:57:03 »
Hey, was an EO tech for 15 years before recently commissioning, feel free to ask away.

Btw, POET is no longer a separate course for EO Techs, it is integrated into the QL3/DP1 course so I'm not sure how a PLAR would go in this case.
Leadership is solving problems. The day soldiers stop bringing you their problems is the day you have stopped leading them. They have either lost confidence that you can help or concluded you do not care. Either case is a failure of leadership. - Colin Powell

Offline brandon_sage92

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Re: Electronic-Optronic Technician ( EO Tech )
« Reply #57 on: February 09, 2019, 20:17:44 »
Thanks for the reply! I have quite a bit of questions.

First question I have is what's a day to day look like in Garrison look like? I want to have an idea of how it differs from the navy to the army.

Next is how much of a stress is there on physical fitness for the trade? Part of the reason why I'm thinking of leaving the Navy is because of the lack of attention to physical fitness--something I value and something I believe anyone in the forces should value.

How often does an EO Tech shift around from base to base over the course of their career?

Finally is there any kind of PLARs for the QL3 if there one has previous electrical experience?

Thanks for your response.


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Offline Old EO Tech

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Re: Electronic-Optronic Technician ( EO Tech )
« Reply #58 on: February 09, 2019, 21:32:22 »
Thanks for the reply! I have quite a bit of questions.

First question I have is what's a day to day look like in Garrison look like? I want to have an idea of how it differs from the navy to the army.

Next is how much of a stress is there on physical fitness for the trade? Part of the reason why I'm thinking of leaving the Navy is because of the lack of attention to physical fitness--something I value and something I believe anyone in the forces should value.

How often does an EO Tech shift around from base to base over the course of their career?

Finally is there any kind of PLARs for the QL3 if there one has previous electrical experience?

Thanks for your response.


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EO Tech's as are all RCEME trades, hard Army, so we generally do Army PT, 5 days a week in most units.  The FORCE Test is still the min requirement, but like the BFT before it, people getting LDA have to do the Combat Force Test as well. So while we are quit busy fixing the Armies kit, we still have to meet the Armies physical fitness requirements.

In Garrison it depends on the unit, but generally speaking you will do PT, then work in a Maint Pl at first line(this is after you become DP2 qualified) and will spend 5 hours a day on average fixing the units equipment, be that LAV Turrets, Tank turrets, generators, M777, night vision etc.  There is never a lack of kit to fix believe me.  You will work with the other RCEME trades, Veh Tech's, Wpns and Mat Tech's as a team to accomplish the priorities of the unit you are posted too. And later on in your career you will work in the Control Office or unit Ops cells and broaden your experience.

Normal postings happen on promotions, so for most 3-4 years in a job, as a Cpl you really need to concentrate at just mastering your trade. As you progress the CM and ETSM will try and ensure that you get a good breath of knowledge and experience, but moving you around to get 1st line, 2nd line, base, school, etc jobs.  In the end we are in the Army and moving is part of the deal.

Hard to say about the PLAR, you may do a shortened DP1, but EO Tech's no longer go to Kingston and do a separate POET package.  CTC/RCEMES will look at your file and determine what if anything we can fast track for you.

If you have any questions let me know, I've been a EO/FCS/ELM tech for 31 years now....time flys...

Jon

Offline sidemount

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Re: Electronic-Optronic Technician ( EO Tech )
« Reply #59 on: February 10, 2019, 09:53:23 »
Well Old EO Tech pretty much spelled it out right there. Like he said, the kit you work on is dependent on the unit you are at.
Just to add a bit, first postings off of QL3/DP1 are generally to a Service Battalion in either Edmonton, Petawawa, Gagetown, and Valcartier. There are other spots but these are the main starting points. From there you will do an on the job training package that will see you get farmed out to various first line units to gain experience on the different types of kit they have. This takes about 1-1.5 years to finish. You then head back to Borden for QL5/DP2 training. After which you are likely to be posted to a 1st line unit at the base you came from. Again, there are other spots to be posted to, or even stay at the Svc Bn.

Its hard to say about the PLAR, you may be able to bypass some things. However the QL3/DP1 is pretty heavy in Optics and Optical theory as well, so you will still be spending a good amount of time in Borden on training.

Fire away more questions!
Leadership is solving problems. The day soldiers stop bringing you their problems is the day you have stopped leading them. They have either lost confidence that you can help or concluded you do not care. Either case is a failure of leadership. - Colin Powell

Offline brandon_sage92

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Re: Electronic-Optronic Technician ( EO Tech )
« Reply #60 on: February 10, 2019, 12:24:07 »
Thanks for the quick response guys I really appreciate it!

Alright for more questions what does EM CTSM stand for/mean? I'm not to familiar with army acronyms.

Secondly, what's life in the field for deployments and excerise like in terms of watches ( not too sure if it's called that in the army as well?). Is one regularly running ops with armoured, arty and infantry to help with kit or is that predominantly done in the FOBs.

Does one ever specialize in a particular piece of kit; i.e. Howitzer, LAV etc? I'm basing my understanding of the trade with what I've seen with the Navy's WEng Techs where juniors get introduced to all weapons systems first, then find or get assigned their specialized, let's call it, 'weapons department' of choice as journeymen.

Finally (for now lol) is what are the biggest pros and cons of the trade based on your experiences of the trade first off, and secondly how it is in comparison to the rest of the army (if there's one thing my military career this far has taught me, it's that all jobs aren't created evenly... Unless one is Airforce allegedly).

Thanks for all the support, as well as quick and detailed responses so far sidemount and Jon, it's much appreciated. Getting proper insight to life in the army is hard enough in the Navy, nevermind this trade seeing as it did want seem like a very large one at that.

Cheers!

Brandon

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Offline sidemount

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Re: Electronic-Optronic Technician ( EO Tech )
« Reply #61 on: February 10, 2019, 16:19:44 »
ETSM is Equipment Technical Sergeant Major...ie the senior tech on base, usually a CWO (although I think that may be changing to an MWO?)
CM is the career manager.

Life in the field for EO is really busy for the first few days/last few days as we set up and tear down the electrical system that powers the camp (we always have ac power which is a nice perk in the field). Other than that you spend your time in the field fixing broken kit as it comes to you. You will generally deploy first line as an EO Tech/Weapons tech mobile repair team along with a mechanic mobile repair team. My experience has been that I have been integrated into the deployed Company or Battery (Infantry and Arty have been where I spent the majority of my time as a tech). You will likely pull a few sentry shifts but most of your time is spent doing repairs.
In Afghanistan I went on mounted patrols with the Infantry Coy's HQ element for emergency repairs but the majority of repairs were completed at FOBs. I can't speak to how they are working things overseas right now as I have been away from the trade for 4 years going to university.

You will be trained to repair all of the kit that falls under the EO Techs (except for tanks, that is a specialty course). After that, you really only become specialized because the unit you are posted to has that piece of kit. For instance, I was very specialized in LAV as I was posted to 1 RCR. After that I became really specialized in M777 because I was posted to 2 RCHA. Long story short, you don't get a choice to become specialized on one particular thing. You are expected to be a SME on just about everything.

One of the things I liked most of the trade are the daily challenges of repairing the kit. Almost every day there was something new. Operators are famous for finding new and outrageous ways to break things. Plus the new(ish) technology that keeps coming online keeps you on your toes to keep the skills up.
The biggest con (and I'll take some grief for this haha) is that the RCEME corps sometimes thinks it has something to prove to the Army. I don't know why by they are always trying to prove that they are harder than Christmas candy...and that game can get old quick. However, I've had some awesome experiences and have been all over Canada, the USA, and a few overseas places doing the job. The tech work is good.

Keep the questions coming!  ;D
Leadership is solving problems. The day soldiers stop bringing you their problems is the day you have stopped leading them. They have either lost confidence that you can help or concluded you do not care. Either case is a failure of leadership. - Colin Powell