Author Topic: Russian binoculars with coloured filters.  (Read 578 times)

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Offline Retired AF Guy

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Russian binoculars with coloured filters.
« on: September 19, 2019, 16:09:47 »
A friend of mine loaned me a pair of Russian ZOMZ БПЦ 7 x 50 binoculars (see attached photo) that were made in 1874. What is interesting is that they binos come with two sets filters ( one orange and one green) that clip over the eyepieces. 

I suspect the orange ones are for dusk or dawn or possibly inclement weather. As for the green filters I have no idea. I've searched the internet and found info on the binos, but nothing as to what the filters are used for.


So, I'm wondering if anyone out there knows anything about what the filters are for.

Any help would be much appreciated.
« Last Edit: September 20, 2019, 15:54:44 by Retired AF Guy »
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Arya Stark

Offline CanadianTire

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Re: Russian binoculars with coloured filters.
« Reply #1 on: September 19, 2019, 17:31:23 »
I find it interesting they have English on them as well as Cyrillic.
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Offline garb811

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Re: Russian binoculars with coloured filters.
« Reply #2 on: September 19, 2019, 18:49:08 »
I wonder if they are early attempts at making the binos laser safe:

Laser Safety Glasses Selection Guide
Quote
Laser safety glasses and goggles are designed to reduce hazardous laser eye exposure to safe and permissible levels by providing an optical density (OD) that attenuates the laser you are working with, while allowing enough visible light transmission (VLT) for comfortable visibility in a lab.  We offer the highest quality laser eyewear from Honeywell and Laservision in a wide variety of different frame styles and Optical Densities suitable for most photonics applications.  Please see our Laser Safety Glasses Selection Guide for additional information.

Offline sidemount

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Re: Russian binoculars with coloured filters.
« Reply #3 on: September 19, 2019, 19:03:26 »
So just some generic filter info

Most coloured filters are for blocking different wavelengths of visible light.
Each colour will block a different specific wavelength, giving you better contrast while viewing your chosen object. You see this a lot in star gazing, which can use many different colurs, to reduce "light polution"

So its a pretty safe bet that your green filter does similar things as the orange and yellow, just for a different  wavelength of light.
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Offline Journeyman

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Re: Russian binoculars with coloured filters.
« Reply #4 on: September 20, 2019, 08:55:33 »
Maybe the rose-coloured lenses are for people who want to stay even further back from that horrible reality stuff.  :pop:

Offline Retired AF Guy

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Re: Russian binoculars with coloured filters.
« Reply #5 on: September 20, 2019, 15:56:32 »
Thanks for the info guys and my apologies over the crappy post. I was modifying the posting and didn't realize I had saved it to the forum. I have re-posted with photo included.
"Leave one wolf alive, and the sheep are never safe."

Arya Stark

Offline Retired AF Guy

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Re: Russian binoculars with coloured filters.
« Reply #6 on: September 20, 2019, 16:01:10 »
I find it interesting they have English on them as well as Cyrillic.

Actually, after posting I did some more research and found that during that time period it was quite common (and not just in Russia) to mark the place of manufacturing in English.
"Leave one wolf alive, and the sheep are never safe."

Arya Stark