Author Topic: Canadian excels on Ranger course  (Read 35138 times)

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Canadian excels on Ranger course
« on: July 12, 2003, 01:18:00 »
http://www.army.forces.gc.ca/lf/English/6_1_1.asp?id=29
 
Canadian excels on Ranger course
Wednesday, May 21, 2003

 
Of the original 230 candidates, only 50 graduated including Sgt Marc Lapointe of 1 R22eR, Capt Louis Lapointe of the Infantry School, Cpl Barry Nisbet of 1 RCR and Lt David Hill of 2 RCR.
 

CTC GAGETOWN - As one of only six Canadians chosen this year to face the challenge of the American Ranger Course, Captain Louis Lapointe not only returned as a successful graduate, but also as the recipient of two impressive awards rarely captured by Canadian candidates: the Ralph Puckett and the William O. Darby awards.

Capt Lapointe, an instructor at the Infantry School, recently conquered 61 days of hunger, sleep deprivation and extreme physical exertion as he went through what is considered to be one of the most difficult courses offered in the American Army.

 
Capt Louis Lapointe's outstanding performance during the American Ranger Course earned him two top awards, top officer candidate and distinguished honor graduate.
 
The Ranger Course, held in the Georgia/Florida area, pushes candidates to the limit of physical and mental exhaustion while applying tactics and techniques of wooded, mountainous and swamp operations. For two months, they battled everything from freezing cold temperatures to constant rain to extreme heat. Hours to rest were few and far between, with the average time to sleep being less than four hours each night.

The feelings brought on by extreme hunger and lack of sleep were like nothing Capt Lapointe had ever experienced before in his military career. He admits that he had never known what it meant to be hungry until now and vows never to be without a snack close by.

There was some degree of fun to be found in everything depending on your perspective, said Capt Lapointe, as he recalled being ordered to sing a solo of the Canadian national anthem after every meal, a practice that soon became the normal after-dinner entertainment.

By the end of the course, Capt Lapointe's outstanding performance earned him the title of Class Honor Graduate, receiving the Ralph Puckett award for top officer candidate.

His exemplary leadership abilities and sustained dedication proved to be worthy of the William O. Darby award for the Distinguished Honor Graduate. This award is given only on occasion when an Honor Graduate has displayed near faultless and flawless skill and ability throughout the entire course and has a high standing amongst course peers. The award represents the original 500 men out of 2 000 volunteers chosen by Major William O. Darby to become the 1st Ranger Battalion in 1942. A rare and prestigious award earned by only a few Canadians.

Of the original group of 230 candidates, only 50 graduated including Capt Lapointe and three of his Canadian comrades.

It gives Capt Lapointe a great deal of satisfaction to have met this personal challenge. He had always wanted to complete the Ranger Course, and after having missed out once before in 1997, he was not about to let this opportunity pass him by again.

"The Americans call it a gut check for top soldiers," he said, "and I wanted to train with the very best."

By 2Lt Kendrah Denny
2Lt Denny is Assistant PAO, Gagetown.

 
 
« Last Edit: October 19, 2004, 21:58:27 by Bruce Monkhouse »

Offline Armoured Reservist

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Re: Canadian excels on Ranger course
« Reply #1 on: January 03, 2005, 17:17:31 »
He must be one tough soldier to of passed that course. Congratulations. And just a quick question, does anybody know what you would have to do to get on a course like that?

Offline Michael O'Leary

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Re: Canadian excels on Ranger course
« Reply #2 on: January 03, 2005, 17:20:14 »
And just a quick question, does anybody know what you would have to do to get on a course like that?

Keep asking for it, keep training for it, demonstrate yourself to be worth the opportunity, .... and hope you're in the right place at the right time when an opening is offered.

Offline Armoured Reservist

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Re: Canadian excels on Ranger course
« Reply #3 on: January 03, 2005, 17:38:56 »
Do you have to be an Officer to get on one of those courses like the Ranger course?

Offline Michael O'Leary

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Re: Canadian excels on Ranger course
« Reply #4 on: January 03, 2005, 17:39:52 »

Of the original 230 candidates, only 50 graduated including Sgt Marc Lapointe of 1 R22eR, Capt Louis Lapointe of the Infantry School, Cpl Barry Nisbet of 1 RCR and Lt David Hill of 2 RCR.
 

Offline X Royal

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Re: Canadian excels on Ranger course
« Reply #5 on: January 03, 2005, 17:53:53 »
Congrats to all candidates and  a two thumbs up to Capt. Lapointe. Not completely unexpected though as most Canadians tend to finish at or very near the top. At least this was the case in years past and I expect still applies.

Offline 48Highlander

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Re: Canadian excels on Ranger course
« Reply #6 on: January 03, 2005, 18:01:56 »
Congrats to all candidates and   a two thumbs up to Capt. Lapointe. Not completely unexpected though as most Canadians tend to finish at or very near the top. At least this was the case in years past and I expect still applies.

    Not sure about that.  The article states that 6 were chosen to go and only lists 4 graduates....

Offline X Royal

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Re: Canadian excels on Ranger course
« Reply #7 on: January 03, 2005, 18:25:01 »
48Highlander if you look you will see I said most finish at or very near the top. In most cases the non finishers are due to medical reasons(common reason for non-completion). The reason the Canadians due so well is because of the so few positions available to Canadians, we only send the very best candidates.

Canadians 66.66% completed.
Course average 21.7% completed. Nuff said.

Pro Patria

« Last Edit: January 03, 2005, 18:34:14 by X Royal »

Offline WB

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Re: Canadian excels on Ranger course
« Reply #8 on: January 03, 2005, 18:26:07 »
Quote
Of the original 230 candidates, only 50 graduated including Sgt Marc Lapointe of 1 R22eR, Capt Louis Lapointe of the Infantry School, Cpl Barry Nisbet of 1 RCR and Lt David Hill of 2 RCR.

It's now MCPL Barry Nisbet - he was promoted this past summer. What a stud-muffin. ;D

Offline 48Highlander

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Re: Canadian excels on Ranger course
« Reply #9 on: January 03, 2005, 18:28:32 »
      I know, but considering we only send our best, having a 33.3% failiure rate (2 out of 6) doesn't qualify as "most" :D

      And yes I know those two could very well be medical RTU's or something of the type.   Not trying to belittle anyones accomplishments.   Just being selected to go is an honour, passing or placing near the top are the icing on the cake.

Offline X Royal

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Re: Canadian excels on Ranger course
« Reply #10 on: January 03, 2005, 18:57:53 »
48Highlander as courses get tougher the non-completion rate increases. When I first joined up the % of   people who started basic & got through basic inf. and on to the battalion varied from 40-50 %. The bean counters at NDHQ figured this was not cost effective so the standards were dropped to allow higher pass %'s. Guess what standard you joined under.   When I joined I thought that when the old boy's said the army was easy compared to when they joined, I thought BS. When I left I   believed.

These Ranger candidates are top soldiers now and would of been in years past also.
« Last Edit: January 03, 2005, 19:09:47 by X Royal »

Offline pbi

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Re: Canadian excels on Ranger course
« Reply #11 on: January 04, 2005, 00:17:06 »
As a rule, Canadians always do well on all US courses that we take. We may have our problems, but we can still turn out some pretty high quality people, and I think that those in the US military who actually know us realize this fact. They just wish there were more of us. Cheers.
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Offline 48Highlander

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Re: Canadian excels on Ranger course
« Reply #12 on: January 04, 2005, 01:24:59 »
I'm not gonna argue with any of that.  Heck, every time I've been down to one of their bases we've gotten the comment that "you guys should be Rangers or something"  :P  Maybe we should see if we can get more spots for the next course ;D

Offline kellywmj

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Re: Canadian excels on Ranger course
« Reply #13 on: January 04, 2005, 16:26:44 »
I wholeheartedly agree with X Royal, standards today are laughable compared to even 20 years ago, and the medical RTU rate for a ranger course is much higher than most. I would say that our selection process for a ranger course is at a  much higher standard than in the states, obviously because the number of slots available are extremely limited.
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Offline Yeoman

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Re: Canadian excels on Ranger course
« Reply #14 on: January 04, 2005, 18:10:24 »
It's now MCPL Barry Nisbet - he was promoted this past summer. What a stud-muffin. ;D
that makes what? 3 boys with ranger tabs on their shoulders in the unit?
jebus, didn't know he took that course though. this makes him scary now lol
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Offline cbt arms sub tech

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Re: Canadian excels on Ranger course
« Reply #15 on: January 05, 2005, 12:47:46 »
Do Canadians get to wear the Ranger Tab on Cad Pad, just curious...?


Offline Big Foot

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Re: Canadian excels on Ranger course
« Reply #16 on: January 05, 2005, 13:15:32 »
I highly doubt it. I don't think anything gets sewn onto CADPAT and to the best of my knowledge, Ranger tabs are sew on, so I'd say no.
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Offline excoelis

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Re: Canadian excels on Ranger course
« Reply #17 on: January 05, 2005, 13:36:24 »
There was a time when the SF and Ranger tab where worn on the ODs but that started to go by the wayside even before CADPAT came out.   In my recent experience, including the recent men's x-mas dinner and subsequent 'at home to the Officers', the only place I see the tab worn is on DEU.
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Offline Michael O'Leary

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Re: Canadian excels on Ranger course
« Reply #18 on: January 05, 2005, 13:41:39 »
Although it hasn't been the most rigourously followed passage, CF Dress Regulations allow for the wear of the ranger tab on the CF Dress uniform but not on combat cothing.

Quote
A-AD-265-000/AG-001
3-3-4

FOREIGN FLYING AND SPECIALIST SKILL BADGES

15. Where an equivalent CF badge has not been designed or approved for wear, the allied country badge presented for the prescribed qualification shall be worn like a CF badge according to wear instructions In paragraphs 7. and 8. and Annex B. If wearing both a CF badge and a foreign badge, the CF badge shall take precedence. The following prescribed foreign qualification badges are authorized for wear on the CF uniform:

a. United States Army Ranger Badge (a sleeve badge); and

b. United States Army Special Forces Badge (a sleeve badge).

Quote
A-AD-265-000/AG-001
3B-1
ANNEX B
FLYING AND SPECIALIST SKILL BADGES

1. Flying and specialist skill badges

a. Tunics, doublets, full dress

(1) A single full-size cloth metallic embroidered badge, centred 0.6 cm (1/4 in.) above medal ribbon(s) on the left breast

d. Army and air force: jacket, mess dress

(1) A single miniature cloth, metallic, embroidered badge, sewn on the left breast, 10 cm (4 in.) down from the shoulder seam to the top edge of the badge, and centred between the edge of the lapel and the arm seam

e. Jacket, service dress; shirts, short-sleeved; jacket, high collar, white (optional), and army undress (patrols)

(1) Either full size cloth embroidered, or cloth metallic embroidered badge (on shirts and the high collar white jacket, a metal badge) centred 0.6 cm (1/4 in.) above undress ribbon(s) on the left breast

h. Field combat clothing

(1) Flying and specialist skill badges are not worn

Offline Love793

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Re: Canadian excels on Ranger course
« Reply #19 on: January 06, 2005, 05:08:01 »
As a rule, Canadians always do well on all US courses that we take. We may have our problems, but we can still turn out some pretty high quality people, and I think that those in the US military who actually know us realize this fact. They just wish there were more of us. Cheers.

Regardless of our slipping standards, for the most part it's well known that man to man, in individual soldier skills our troops are superior.  We're trained in more than one job across the army.  This along with the wealth of operational experience that the Reg Force have ,and the Canadian "Just get it done" attitude is probably a key factor in why we traditionally place high on this and other American crses.  If only we had the numbers and kit, but I digress.

Congrats to all for being selected to go, and for the 4 whom passed. :cdn:
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Offline Mark C

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Re: Canadian excels on Ranger course
« Reply #20 on: January 06, 2005, 16:32:21 »
For those who put stock in "buttons and bows", the Ranger and SF tabs are worn only on the Canadian DEU and Mess Dress. 

As if it really matters.  Those who have graduated from those foreign courses know what they've accomplished.  We are sufficiently small as an Army that those around them also know.  Anything more would be sheer self-aggrandizement. 

I for one, am quite happy to note that our Army has never seen a need to indulge in wearing our Personnel Files on our combat uniforms.....  Let's keep it that way.

Just my personal opinion, of course.

Offline Infanteer

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Re: Canadian excels on Ranger course
« Reply #21 on: January 06, 2005, 17:22:29 »
for the most part it's well known that man to man, in individual soldier skills our troops are superior.   We're trained in more than one job across the army.   This along with the wealth of operational experience that the Reg Force have ,and the Canadian "Just get it done" attitude is probably a key factor in why we traditionally place high on this and other American crses.

I wouldn't be to easy to discount the average American serviceman anymore.  Consider the fact that they've been on "War" footing for 3 years now.  As PBI has alluded to, the skills and capabilities of the US soldier is probably going to destroy some comfy Canadian misconceptions.

I for one, am quite happy to note that our Army has never seen a need to indulge in wearing our Personnel Files on our combat uniforms..... Let's keep it that way.

Here here - too much gaudy junk just looks tacky.

I have a buddy in the American Army with 5 ribbons - he's yet to be in an operational unit yet....
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Re: Canadian excels on Ranger course
« Reply #22 on: January 18, 2005, 13:52:38 »
Barry Nesbitt is not only a fine soldier but a fine man as well, we spent some time together when Cpl Murphy died last year, we were both close friends of his. I don't think that there is anything out there that could stop Barry Nesbitt, based on his character alone, nevermind his superior soldering skills  :salute:
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Offline Love793

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Re: Canadian excels on Ranger course
« Reply #23 on: January 18, 2005, 15:58:21 »
I wouldn't be to easy to discount the average American serviceman anymore.   Consider the fact that they've been on "War" footing for 3 years now.   As PBI has alluded to, the skills and capabilities of the US soldier is probably going to destroy some comfy Canadian misconceptions.

Here here - too much gaudy junk just looks tacky.

I have a buddy in the American Army with 5 ribbons - he's yet to be in an operational unit yet....

I never tried to discount them, they are all truly professionals, and I would go to war with those guys any day of the week.  They're skills are incresing by leaps and bounds, however I still feel they rely to much on tecnology.  What do you do when the batteries die on the PLGR?  Things like that are what I was getting at.
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Re: Canadian excels on Ranger course
« Reply #24 on: January 24, 2005, 22:20:02 »
Congratulations to the soldiers who qualified, they had a show on the ranger coarse on the discovery channel,  absolutely tuff.
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