Author Topic: Aerospace Engineer ( AERE )  (Read 44647 times)

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Offline VanIslander

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Re: AERE Career Choices
« Reply #50 on: June 14, 2017, 22:19:43 »
I tried looking for answers to this question but perhaps i wasn't searching the correct word combinations to find helpful answers.

How do career opportunities within the military and specific trades work? Lets say i was finished BMOQ and there were different specializations within the trade such as working in a project management role  vs a technical role. Do you get any say in which you would prefer to do or is it just "youre going here". Im not particularly concerned about location posting but more job opportunities within the job itself such as when particular openings or new job types come up that you would be interested in. Can you actively try to get into to certain positions within your rank and trade? I understand that positions may have many people after them and may be competitive but im more curious about the ability to direct yourself into certain fields with that in mind.
 I am applying for AERE if that matters.

Title changed for clarity by Loachman.

I can only speak to what it's like in AERE, but your training will look like this:

-BMOQ (16 weeks IIRC)
-AERE Prep Phases 1 and 2 (aka APP1 and APP2, basically On-Job Training, length depends on a lot of factors)
-AOBC, the AERE Officer Basic Course, completion of which means you are now a qualified AERE and have reached what's called your OFP or Operational Functional Point (8 months)
-First posting to the various areas of employment open to first-tour AEREs.

If you are ROTP you will do BMOQ and APP1 & 2 during your summers while at RMC.  You will do these at one of the various squadrons across the country.

If you are direct-entry like I am, you will do BMOQ and then go straight to APP, doing both phases back to back.  I started BMOQ in the fall and arrived at Trenton for my APP just before that Christmas.  I spent almost a year in Trenton doing various OJT things before shipping out to CFB Borden which is where AOBC is run.  AOBC is 8 months long (ish) and runs from November to the end of June, annually.  It's designed to get you ready to hit the ground running at your first posting, with a strong practical focus.  It's a pretty good course, actually.

After AOBC you can expect to be posted to any of the following:

-Flying Squadrons (e.g. 429, 425, 427, etc.) and Air Maintenance Squadrons (e.g. 8 AMS)
-Project Management Offices (e.g. the PMO that is delivering the new Fixed-Wing SAR aircraft)
-Weapon System Management offices (every fleet has a WSM, so you could for example find yourself staffing engineering dispositions for the CC130J Super Hercules, or whatever fleet really)
-A "staff job" for lack of a better term (e.g. maybe you're the course officer for NCM courses at CFSATE)
-Other, more niche areas like the Electronic Warfare centre or working under A4 Maint in Winnipeg, doing small one-off design work at ATESS, etc.

Postings are obviously based on your preference but also obviously are subject to the needs of the Armed Forces.  At the end of the day, somebody has to go Goose Bay, or wherever.  There are some 600 AEREs in the Forces, the bulk of whom work in Ottawa in the various PMOs, WSMs, and other niche jobs.  At any given time, ~6% of the trade is doing non-AERE stuff.  I know a guy who did a tour with CJIRU before going back to the core AERE business of supporting flying operations, for example.

After your first posting, then the trade opens up to you.  There are lots of other courses you can take to get more qualifications and authorizations under your belt.  Some you will need, others will be just for fun.  For example, a big part of AERE is explosives/ordnance and there are tons of courses you can take in that regard.  Space operations is another, and I believe I already mentioned electronic warfare.  Most of these have intro-level courses that you can take online, and then the more advanced courses are taught in the classroom setting.  I took an intermediate-level International Law of Armed Conflict course run by the JAG, for example, which has nothing to do with AERE but it was a super interesting way to spend 4 days.  On the other hand, let's say you really want to get into the Space side of things.  On APP (if you have time) or at your first unit, take the basic space operations course and move forward from there.  Talk to people who work for DG Space, and schmooze with the influential brass when they come visit you on AOBC.

If there's a specific job or course you want to go on, then it'll be up to you to do the networking and the coursework to make it happen.  Every occupation within the military has one or more Career Managers that essentially decide who gets posted where, but they take input from the various units.  So if a particular unit tells the career manager that they want you to come work for them, that will greatly increase your odds (No guarantees, though!).

Hope that helps,

Happy to answer any questions I'm able.
« Last Edit: June 14, 2017, 23:09:25 by VanIslander »

Offline shane306

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Re: AERE Career Choices
« Reply #51 on: June 16, 2017, 10:19:05 »
Wow thank you VanIslander for taking the time to write such a thorough and informative response. You answered all of my questions and ones i didn't have yet. It certainly clears up a lot of the confusion about what the training and process would be like for AERE as there doesn't seem to be a ton of AEREs on the board.

Offline VanIslander

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Re: AERE Career Choices
« Reply #52 on: June 16, 2017, 11:06:49 »
Wow thank you VanIslander for taking the time to write such a thorough and informative response. You answered all of my questions and ones i didn't have yet. It certainly clears up a lot of the confusion about what the training and process would be like for AERE as there doesn't seem to be a ton of AEREs on the board.

My pleasure.

Quick caveat:  If you are interested in Space, please do yourself a favour and talk to a CELE about the space side of their trade, because those folks are heavily involved as well, but in different areas.  SATCOM, for example, is a core CELE competency whereas, say, orbit selection would be AERE (I guess).

Let me know if you have any further questions, though I'm not super knowledgeable about the Space Ops side of things.

Offline shane306

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Re: AERE Career Choices
« Reply #53 on: June 27, 2017, 18:46:54 »

After your first posting, then the trade opens up to you.  There are lots of other courses you can take to get more qualifications and authorizations under your belt.  Some you will need, others will be just for fun.  For example, a big part of AERE is explosives/ordnance and there are tons of courses you can take in that regard.  Space operations is another, and I believe I already mentioned electronic warfare.  Most of these have intro-level courses that you can take online, and then the more advanced courses are taught in the classroom setting.  I took an intermediate-level International Law of Armed Conflict course run by the JAG, for example, which has nothing to do with AERE but it was a super interesting way to spend 4 days.  On the other hand, let's say you really want to get into the Space side of things.  On APP (if you have time) or at your first unit, take the basic space operations course and move forward from there.  Talk to people who work for DG Space, and schmooze with the influential brass when they come visit you on AOBC.


How much opportunity have you had to take various courses when the come along. I understand that you have more of chance to take courses if they are offered at the base you are already posted at and that most of the AEREs are posted at the largest bases. How do you know when courses are coming along?

Offline VanIslander

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Re: AERE Career Choices
« Reply #54 on: July 05, 2017, 13:32:22 »
How much opportunity have you had to take various courses when the come along. I understand that you have more of chance to take courses if they are offered at the base you are already posted at and that most of the AEREs are posted at the largest bases. How do you know when courses are coming along?

Well, that all depends on which courses we're talking about.

DLN[1] online courses (CAFJOD[2], AFOD[3], many intro-level courses) are a cinch as all you need to do, typically, is to either sign up yourself or ask your unit's ETO[4] to have you loaded onto the course with your boss's blessing if it's something like the AFOD/CAFJOD courses that can be demanding on your time.  You can do them anywhere there's internet connectivity and many of them are offered either on-demand or multiple times per year.  For AFOD and CAFJOD in particular they are supposed to give you a few hours per week at work to plug away at them, but I always preferred to do the courses at home with a nice cold beer.

Other courses can be trickier, depending on the nature of the course.  Some are by application only (e.g. if you want to become a Flight Test Engineer there's a calculus exam followed by a 2-week evaluation period before you get to go onward).  If you aren't located where the course is being run, you can often get authorized for what's called Travel Duty or TD, wherein you get reimbursed for your meals/lodging/travel expenses.  Obviously the budget for TD is finite, so the onus will be on you to make the case as to why this course benefits you/the Forces enough to justify the TD expense (not usually a problem if it's reasonable).  As an example, even though the Law of Armed Conflict is (frankly) not super relevant to my day-to-day job, I had no trouble getting loaded on the Law of Armed Conflict course that I took because it was offered at Trenton, where I was working, so there was no TD required.  However we had some Naval and Army officers there who had been flown in on TD all the way from Halifax and New Brunswick because as combat arms/operators it's extremely relevant to their daily business, so the TD expense was justified.  Hope that makes sense.

As for knowing when the courses are coming along, often they will solicit applications via the CANFORGEN[5] message system.  Others are run so frequently that they don't require this or will have internal websites with calendars and signup instructions.  Others still (mostly the online ones) are run on-demand.

As always, your job comes first so there may be times when you won't be able to take a course if there are operational pressures.  Example:  I wanted to take a Space Ops course last October and was loaded and ready.  However my unit needed to send a junior AERE to the SAREX in Yellowknife, so guess who had to drop out of his course? :) Just gotta be flexible.

At the end of the day, much can be learned by scouring the internal networks and just talking to people.  If there's a course you really want but aren't sure how to take, you can always ask your unit's ETO.  They don't bite.

One final correction:  I noticed you wrote that most AEREs are posted to the largest bases.  While it's true that there are more AEREs at Trenton or Cold Lake than at, say, Goose Bay, the majority of AEREs are in actually in Ottawa.  The AERE at the line units putting "rubber on the ramp" is the primary focus of course, but backing that person up is this huge support apparatus, from A4 Maint in Winnipeg to DAEPM[6] and DTAES[7] in Ottawa, and those people are there to do the background engineering work to help you at the unit keep the aircraft flying in a safe and airworthy manner.

Sorry about the acronym soup:

[1] DLN - Defense Learning Network
[2] CAFJOD - Canadian Armed Forces Junior Officer Development
[3] AFOD - Air Force Officer Development
[4] ETO - Employment/Training OFfice
[5] CANFORGENs - CANadian FORces GENeral messages
[6] DAEPM - Directorate of Aerospace Equipment Program Management (IIRC)
[7] DTAES - Directorate of Technical Airworthiness and Engineering Support

Hope this helps


« Last Edit: July 05, 2017, 13:46:58 by VanIslander »

Offline kevinring

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Re: AERE Career Choices
« Reply #55 on: September 28, 2017, 20:37:42 »
I can only speak to what it's like in AERE, but your training will look like this:

-BMOQ (16 weeks IIRC)
-AERE Prep Phases 1 and 2 (aka APP1 and APP2, basically On-Job Training, length depends on a lot of factors)
-AOBC, the AERE Officer Basic Course, completion of which means you are now a qualified AERE and have reached what's called your OFP or Operational Functional Point (8 months)
-First posting to the various areas of employment open to first-tour AEREs.

If you are ROTP you will do BMOQ and APP1 & 2 during your summers while at RMC.  You will do these at one of the various squadrons across the country.

If you are direct-entry like I am, you will do BMOQ and then go straight to APP, doing both phases back to back.  I started BMOQ in the fall and arrived at Trenton for my APP just before that Christmas.  I spent almost a year in Trenton doing various OJT things before shipping out to CFB Borden which is where AOBC is run.  AOBC is 8 months long (ish) and runs from November to the end of June, annually.  It's designed to get you ready to hit the ground running at your first posting, with a strong practical focus.  It's a pretty good course, actually.

After AOBC you can expect to be posted to any of the following:

-Flying Squadrons (e.g. 429, 425, 427, etc.) and Air Maintenance Squadrons (e.g. 8 AMS)
-Project Management Offices (e.g. the PMO that is delivering the new Fixed-Wing SAR aircraft)
-Weapon System Management offices (every fleet has a WSM, so you could for example find yourself staffing engineering dispositions for the CC130J Super Hercules, or whatever fleet really)
-A "staff job" for lack of a better term (e.g. maybe you're the course officer for NCM courses at CFSATE)
-Other, more niche areas like the Electronic Warfare centre or working under A4 Maint in Winnipeg, doing small one-off design work at ATESS, etc.

Postings are obviously based on your preference but also obviously are subject to the needs of the Armed Forces.  At the end of the day, somebody has to go Goose Bay, or wherever.  There are some 600 AEREs in the Forces, the bulk of whom work in Ottawa in the various PMOs, WSMs, and other niche jobs.  At any given time, ~6% of the trade is doing non-AERE stuff.  I know a guy who did a tour with CJIRU before going back to the core AERE business of supporting flying operations, for example.

After your first posting, then the trade opens up to you.  There are lots of other courses you can take to get more qualifications and authorizations under your belt.  Some you will need, others will be just for fun.  For example, a big part of AERE is explosives/ordnance and there are tons of courses you can take in that regard.  Space operations is another, and I believe I already mentioned electronic warfare.  Most of these have intro-level courses that you can take online, and then the more advanced courses are taught in the classroom setting.  I took an intermediate-level International Law of Armed Conflict course run by the JAG, for example, which has nothing to do with AERE but it was a super interesting way to spend 4 days.  On the other hand, let's say you really want to get into the Space side of things.  On APP (if you have time) or at your first unit, take the basic space operations course and move forward from there.  Talk to people who work for DG Space, and schmooze with the influential brass when they come visit you on AOBC.

If there's a specific job or course you want to go on, then it'll be up to you to do the networking and the coursework to make it happen.  Every occupation within the military has one or more Career Managers that essentially decide who gets posted where, but they take input from the various units.  So if a particular unit tells the career manager that they want you to come work for them, that will greatly increase your odds (No guarantees, though!).

Hope that helps,

Happy to answer any questions I'm able.

I am an AERE candidate, and I have been on the competition list for six months. Thank you for sharing this information. I hope to be selected soon.
CFRC: Ottawa
Regular/ Reserve: Regular
Officer/NCM: Officer (DEO)
Trade choice 1: AERE
Trade choice 2: MS ENG
Application Date: March, 2015
First Contact: March, 2015
CFAT: July, 2015
Medical: February 28, 2017
Interview: March 30, 2017
Merit list: April, 2017
Position Offered: ??
Ceremony: ??
BMOQ: ??

Offline VanIslander

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Re: AERE Career Choices
« Reply #56 on: September 30, 2017, 01:34:47 »
You're welcome. Best of luck with the selection process.

Offline SupersonicMax

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Re: Areospace Engineer ( AERE )
« Reply #57 on: September 30, 2017, 12:44:18 »
Another career path for AEREs is becoming a Flight Test Engineer.  If selected, you attend a year-long course outside Canada pertaining to Flight Testing.  You get to fly quite a bit on course (100 hours in about any type, from helicopters to gliders to tail draggers to aerobatic aircraft to western fighters to eastern block fighters).   This is followed with employment at the Aerospace Engineering Test Establishment in Cold Lake for 4 years, where you'll continue flying a fair amount.  These positions are designated flying position so you would officially become an aircrew.

Offline ben.abbas

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Re: Areospace Engineer ( AERE )
« Reply #58 on: November 18, 2017, 00:14:09 »
HI

I have interview in December 2017 for AERE. I am not sure how many positions are opening in 2018. If anyone can give glimpse of how AERE interview is done will be great. I applied for DEO. I have degree in mechanical engineering.

How many AEREs do hard core engineering and how many do Project Management. I like both of them.

Thank you

Offline VanIslander

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Re: Areospace Engineer ( AERE )
« Reply #59 on: November 18, 2017, 13:53:12 »
If anyone can give glimpse of how AERE interview is done will be great.
The interview is rather generic, or was when I went through.  It's not technical.

Quote
How many AEREs do hard core engineering
Depends on your definition of "hard core engineering".  Technical jobs exist at ATESS, AETE, and DAEPM but are a minority.

Quote
and how many do Project Management.
The vast majority.
« Last Edit: November 18, 2017, 13:56:50 by VanIslander »

Offline shane306

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Re: Areospace Engineer ( AERE )
« Reply #60 on: January 01, 2018, 19:40:17 »
Another career path for AEREs is becoming a Flight Test Engineer.  If selected, you attend a year-long course outside Canada pertaining to Flight Testing.  You get to fly quite a bit on course (100 hours in about any type, from helicopters to gliders to tail draggers to aerobatic aircraft to western fighters to eastern block fighters).   This is followed with employment at the Aerospace Engineering Test Establishment in Cold Lake for 4 years, where you'll continue flying a fair amount.  These positions are designated flying position so you would officially become an aircrew.

Would you be able to elaborate a bit more on this? I am curious about this possibility. At what phase would AEREs be selected to transfer to it, and what is involved in the job besides flying?

Offline SupersonicMax

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Re: Areospace Engineer ( AERE )
« Reply #61 on: January 02, 2018, 12:26:30 »
After your first tour, you can apply for a position as FTE at AETE.  If your file is strong enough, you write a math exam. If you pass the math exam, you may be invited for a 2-week selection in Cold Lake where you'll be introduced to Flight Testing through academics, flying and reporting.  If successful, you may be asked to attend one of the 5 western, recognized Test Pilot Schools (it comes with a 4-year mandatory service commitment).

Ar AETE, you'll be project officer on new equipment the Air Force is procuring, conducting Engineering Test and Evaluation on it and sometimes, Development Test and Evaluation for equipment that is being fielded.  This means managing projects, coming up with methods to test effectively, flight testing and reporting.

Offline shane306

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Re: AERE Career Choices
« Reply #62 on: January 06, 2018, 15:24:18 »


-BMOQ (16 weeks IIRC)
-AERE Prep Phases 1 and 2 (aka APP1 and APP2, basically On-Job Training, length depends on a lot of factors)
-AOBC, the AERE Officer Basic Course, completion of which means you are now a qualified AERE and have reached what's called your OFP or Operational Functional Point (8 months)
-First posting to the various areas of employment open to first-tour AEREs.

If you are direct-entry like I am, you will do BMOQ and then go straight to APP, doing both phases back to back.  I started BMOQ in the fall and arrived at Trenton for my APP just before that Christmas.  I spent almost a year in Trenton doing various OJT things before shipping out to CFB Borden which is where AOBC is run.  AOBC is 8 months long (ish) and runs from November to the end of June, annually.  It's designed to get you ready to hit the ground running at your first posting, with a strong practical focus.  It's a pretty good course, actually.

Can you tell me what sort of stuff is involved during the APP part of your training?

Offline VanIslander

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Re: Areospace Engineer ( AERE )
« Reply #63 on: January 07, 2018, 21:12:51 »
It's mostly on-job training.

You'll shadow technicians at the Cpl or MCpl level, and then at the more senior level.  You should do a rotation through first line facilities as well as second line facilities if they're available at your wing. We did a tour of aerospace industry and DND offices in Ottawa as well.

The goal is to expose you to what work is like on the hangar or shop floor so you're not that officer that says "hey, change this engine.. That'll take 30 minutes right?"

You'll also be doing some desk/study work to begin familiarizing yourself with airworthiness policy, which is basically the entire reason AERE is a thing.

It's your chance to get exposed and immersed before you have too many responsibilities to go out and help turn wrenches.

You may be given one or two special projects that are important but that your chain of command maybe does the have time to spare for.
« Last Edit: January 07, 2018, 21:40:35 by VanIslander »

Offline ssrb653

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Re: Areospace Engineer ( AERE )
« Reply #64 on: April 12, 2018, 14:21:31 »
After your first tour, you can apply for a position as FTE at AETE.  If your file is strong enough, you write a math exam. If you pass the math exam, you may be invited for a 2-week selection in Cold Lake where you'll be introduced to Flight Testing through academics, flying and reporting.  If successful, you may be asked to attend one of the 5 western, recognized Test Pilot Schools (it comes with a 4-year mandatory service commitment).

Ar AETE, you'll be project officer on new equipment the Air Force is procuring, conducting Engineering Test and Evaluation on it and sometimes, Development Test and Evaluation for equipment that is being fielded.  This means managing projects, coming up with methods to test effectively, flight testing and reporting.

Hello SupersonicMax
I have been recently selected for AERE occupation and I really want to be FTE. You mentioned that if the file is strong enough then you can be selected for a math exam. What makes a file strong to be chosen for FTE. What are some of the things I can do during my training and my first tour to have a strong file so I would have a better chance to write the math exam for FTE selection.

I would really appreciate your input.

Thanks
Recruiting Center: Montreal
Regular/Reserve: Regular
Officer/NCM:     DEO
Trade Choice 1: Pilot
Trade Choice 2: AEC
Trade Choice 3: AERE
Application Date: 16/02/10
First Contact: 16/02/11
CFAT: 16/02/11
Medical: 17/09/12
Interview: 17/09/12
ACS: 17/01/11 (passed For AEC)
Reliability Check:Oct, 2016
Security Screening: 17/08/15
Air Factor: 18/03/09
Merit listed: 18/03/22
Position Offered: 18/04/11 (AERE)
Enrollment: 18/05/08
BMOQ: 18/05/14

Offline VanIslander

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Re: Areospace Engineer ( AERE )
« Reply #65 on: May 08, 2018, 16:03:37 »
Hello SupersonicMax
I have been recently selected for AERE occupation and I really want to be FTE. You mentioned that if the file is strong enough then you can be selected for a math exam. What makes a file strong to be chosen for FTE. What are some of the things I can do during my training and my first tour to have a strong file so I would have a better chance to write the math exam for FTE selection.

I would really appreciate your input.

Thanks

"The file" is your application file and as per the AETE intranet site, consists of:

A letter substantiating your interest in applying to be an evaluator;
A letter of recommendation from your Commanding Officer;
A copy of your university transcripts. Candidates must hold a baccalaureate degree or higher in engineering, applied science, mathematics or physics;
A recent Military Personnel Record Resume (MPRR);
A completed Statement of Understanding (Form DND 2830-E); and
Height and Weight (required for eligibility to fly in ejection seat aircraft).

(as well as some medical/admin stuff).

The part that you can influence is therefore your letter expressing interest, and the letter of recommendation from your CO.

Offline ssrb653

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Re: Areospace Engineer ( AERE )
« Reply #66 on: May 10, 2018, 12:22:25 »
"The file" is your application file and as per the AETE intranet site, consists of:

A letter substantiating your interest in applying to be an evaluator;
A letter of recommendation from your Commanding Officer;
A copy of your university transcripts. Candidates must hold a baccalaureate degree or higher in engineering, applied science, mathematics or physics;
A recent Military Personnel Record Resume (MPRR);
A completed Statement of Understanding (Form DND 2830-E); and
Height and Weight (required for eligibility to fly in ejection seat aircraft).

(as well as some medical/admin stuff).

The part that you can influence is therefore your letter expressing interest, and the letter of recommendation from your CO.

Thanks a lot for the information. I will keep that in mind when the time comes for me to apply for FTE. I really appreciate all your input
Recruiting Center: Montreal
Regular/Reserve: Regular
Officer/NCM:     DEO
Trade Choice 1: Pilot
Trade Choice 2: AEC
Trade Choice 3: AERE
Application Date: 16/02/10
First Contact: 16/02/11
CFAT: 16/02/11
Medical: 17/09/12
Interview: 17/09/12
ACS: 17/01/11 (passed For AEC)
Reliability Check:Oct, 2016
Security Screening: 17/08/15
Air Factor: 18/03/09
Merit listed: 18/03/22
Position Offered: 18/04/11 (AERE)
Enrollment: 18/05/08
BMOQ: 18/05/14

Offline gamerxy

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Re: Aerospace Engineer ( AERE )
« Reply #67 on: May 10, 2018, 14:07:03 »
Thanks for info.

Offline Calvillo

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Re: Aerospace Engineer ( AERE )
« Reply #68 on: July 01, 2018, 12:17:43 »
Asking for my child who is interested in being an engineer: do you do significant amount of design and modelling? If so, what platform do you typically use? As well, how about lab works? Material testing, fatigue testing for example. Lastly, do you get the opportunity to get Professional Engineering designation as well as to maintain it?

Offline VanIslander

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Re: Aerospace Engineer ( AERE )
« Reply #69 on: July 13, 2018, 19:48:29 »
Asking for my child who is interested in being an engineer: do you do significant amount of design and modelling? If so, what platform do you typically use? As well, how about lab works? Material testing, fatigue testing for example. Lastly, do you get the opportunity to get Professional Engineering designation as well as to maintain it?

Very few AERE people do design and modelling. Perhaps if you get posted to ATESS, or a specific subsection within DTAES, you might.

Lab work, not so much.  We do test and evaluation, but we aren't testing material properties. The test and eval conducted in the air force is to assess technical airworthiness or suitability, or else to test operational airworthiness or suitability.

That's pretty much it.

You can get your PEng, and maintain it.

Offline Calvillo

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Re: Aerospace Engineer ( AERE )
« Reply #70 on: July 14, 2018, 22:30:49 »
Thank you.

Offline Shrinjay

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Re: Aerospace Engineer ( AERE )
« Reply #71 on: August 09, 2018, 05:20:36 »
So it seems like the chances of getting posted to a hard engineering position on your first tour is low, which is fair after all someone needs to do the paperwork and I'm more than willing to put my time in. However, how can you maximize your chances of getting a hard engineering position, or becoming an FTE but that's kind of redundant since that info is already here, after your first tour? Being a good officer, taking courses etc. Would that kind of stuff make you a better candidate or is it mostly luck? Just curious.
« Last Edit: August 09, 2018, 16:15:30 by Shrinjay »

Offline SupersonicMax

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Re: Aerospace Engineer ( AERE )
« Reply #72 on: August 09, 2018, 07:00:23 »
So it seems like the chances of getting posted to a hard engineering position on your first tour is low, which is fair after all someone needs to do the paperwork and I'm more than willing to put my time in. However, how can you maximize your chances of getting a hard engineering position, or becoming an FTE but that's kind of redundant, after your first tour? Being a good officer, taking courses etc. Would that kind of stuff make you a better candidate or is it mostly luck? Just curious.

Becoming an FTE is redundant?  How so?

Offline Shrinjay

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Re: Aerospace Engineer ( AERE )
« Reply #73 on: August 09, 2018, 16:14:07 »
No I meant the information for being an FTE is already out there. I should probably correct that.

Offline VanIslander

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Re: Aerospace Engineer ( AERE )
« Reply #74 on: August 16, 2018, 09:25:51 »
So it seems like the chances of getting posted to a hard engineering position on your first tour is low, which is fair after all someone needs to do the paperwork and I'm more than willing to put my time in. However, how can you maximize your chances of getting a hard engineering position, or becoming an FTE but that's kind of redundant since that info is already here, after your first tour? Being a good officer, taking courses etc. Would that kind of stuff make you a better candidate or is it mostly luck? Just curious.

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