Author Topic: F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF)  (Read 1605245 times)

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Offline Rifleman62

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Re: F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF)
« Reply #4300 on: October 12, 2018, 08:45:51 »
https://www.cnn.com/2018/10/11/politics/f-35-grounded-inspection/index.html

Pentagon temporarily grounds new F-35 jets after crash - 11 Oct 18

Washington (CNN)The Defense Department has temporarily grounded all of its 245 F-35 fighter jets for inspection of a potentially faulty engine part in the wake of last month's crash in South Carolina.

Initial data from the ongoing investigation into the September 28 crash indicates a fuel tube may have been faulty. In response, all US military F-35s will be inspected as well as F-35s operated by US allies. "If suspect fuel tubes are installed, the part will be removed and replaced. If known good fuel tubes are already installed, then those aircraft will be returned to flight status," the Defense Department said in a statement. Inspections are expected to be completed within the next two days, the statement said, and a defense official told CNN some aircraft have already been returned to flight status.

The initial assessment is the faulty tube may be on older models of the aircraft, but all are being inspected.

The first US combat mission conducted by an F-35 happened last month when a Marine Corps jet launched off the amphibious warship USS Essex struck targets in Afghanistan. In May, Israel announced it had conducted the first combat missions ever using the F-35 but offered few details.

Other nations that have signed contracts to join the F-35 program include the UK, Italy, the Netherlands, Turkey, Canada, Australia, Denmark and Norway, according to the Pentagon. The Air Force has 156 F-35 aircraft in inventory; the Marine Corps has 61 and the Navy has 28.

The F-35 stealth jet has been called the most expensive weapons system in history, and its development was beset by multiple delays before it was deemed combat ready. The jet, which has reduced capability to be seen by adversary radars, has been a favorite of President Donald Trump, who has lauded the F-35 several times for being "invisible."


https://www.haaretz.com/us-news/pentagon-reportedly-grounds-all-f-35-joint-strike-fighters-1.6550774

Israel Follows Pentagon in Grounding F-35 Stealth Fighters
- 11 Oct 18
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Offline tomahawk6

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Re: F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF)
« Reply #4301 on: October 12, 2018, 11:14:27 »
My error. It does say fuel tubes.
« Last Edit: October 12, 2018, 11:45:31 by tomahawk6 »

Offline tomahawk6

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Re: F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF)
« Reply #4302 on: October 17, 2018, 09:29:35 »
The fuel tube problem wasn't as extensive,and 80% of the fleet is operational. 

https://www.defensenews.com/air/2018/10/15/most-f-35s-return-to-flight-operations-after-fuel-tube-problem/

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Re: F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF)
« Reply #4303 on: October 17, 2018, 16:56:34 »
Latest:

Quote
F-35 Testing May Slow Two Months Due To Fuel Tube Crash
More than 80 percent of operational F-35s have returned to flight operations but the fuel tube problems may delay testing another two months.

Although more than 80 percent of the F-35 fleet is back in the air after the program’s first crash, I understand from a source intimately familiar with the testing regime that initial operational testing (IOTE) is likely to be delayed up to two months by the fuel tube problem afflicting the fleet.

I contacted the Joint Program Office and spokesman Joe DellaVedova said today:

“November 2018 is still the target start date for formal operational testing, pending completion of the remaining readiness actions. Impacts from a mandatory fuel system inspection are being assessed.” (Emphasis added)

Underside of the F-35B as it does a vertical landing back on the USS Essex after the F-35’s first-ever combat strike .

Now, two months (or less) is not a huge amount of time, but it comes on top of years of delays to the program. By the way, this would be the second two-month delay to IOTE in 2018, so that would be four months in one year, which isn’t insignificant. (We wouldn’t be surprised if POGO comments on this as proof of more “problems” with the F-35).

Here’s what the F-35 program said in its official statement Monday — after I inquired:

“After completing inspections, more than 80 percent of operational F-35s have been cleared and returned to flight operations. All U.S. services and international partners have resumed flying with their cleared aircraft.”

The rest of the JPO statement, however, indicates that the other 20 percent of the fleet may not get into the air for an unspecified period:

“The F-35 Joint Program Office continues to work closely with the military services to prioritize fuel tube replacements using the current spares inventory. Pratt & Whitney is rapidly procuring more parts to minimize the overall repair timeline for the remaining jets. Current inventory will restore about half of the impacted jets to flight operations, and the remaining aircraft are expected to be cleared for flight over the coming weeks. The issue is not expected to impact F-35 deliveries and the program remains on track to meet its target of 91 aircraft for the year.” (Again, emphasis ours).

Not no mention of IOTE. Now, DellaVedova’s statement today says the target remains next month, but it also admits the effects of the discovery of the faulty fuel tube aboard the F-35B that crashed Sept. 28 near Beaufort, S.C. are still “being assessed.” So, we’ll see.
https://breakingdefense.com/2018/10/f-35-testing-may-slow-two-months-due-to-fuel-tube-crash/

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Re: F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF)
« Reply #4304 on: October 22, 2018, 15:59:50 »
Looks like LockMart has another foreign buyer in its pocket, note nuke factor (also consideration for Luftwaffe's Tornado replacement):

Quote
Belgium reportedly picks F-35 for future fighter jet

WASHINGTON and LIÈGE, Belgium — Belgium appears poised to select Lockheed Martin’s F-35 over the Eurofighter Typhoon as its next-generation fighter jet, with government sources on Oct. 22 telling national news outlet Belga that an F-35 victory has already been decided.

The Belgian government is expected to formally announce its decision before Oct. 29, Reuters reported on Monday.

A Lockheed Martin spokesman said he could not confirm whether Belgium had communicated its choice to the firm, but said the company remains confident in its offering.

“The F-35 offers transformational capability for the Belgian Air Force and, if selected, will align them with a global coalition operating the world’s most advanced aircraft,” Mike Friedman said in an emailed statement. “The F-35 program is built on strong international partnerships, and our proposal includes significant industrial opportunities for Belgian companies to contribute to the global F-35 enterprise.”

The F-35 was widely considered the favorite in the competition, which included the Eurofighter — a partnership among the United Kingdom, Italy, Spain and Germany...

For Brussels, the capital of Europe, to choose the U.S. plane would amount to nothing less than an act of “betrayal,” the French business journal La Tribune headlined on Monday [ https://www.latribune.fr/entreprises-finance/industrie/aeronautique-defense/f-35-en-belgique-chronique-d-une-trahison-annoncee-de-l-europe-de-la-defense-794858.html ].

Two practical considerations were seen as playing heavily into the Belgian government's inclination toward the joint strike fighter: For one, the neighboring Netherlands already is an F-35 customer. The two countries agreed some years ago to pool their resources in policing their common airspace, and having only one aircraft type presumably would be good for interoperability.

In addition, Belgium for decades has had an agreement with NATO that requires its planes to be capable of carrying U.S. nuclear weapons
[emphasis added] into a hypothetical atomic war. Belgium, like neighbor Germany, stores a few warheads within its borders for that purpose.

Certifying a European-made aircraft, like the Airbus Eurofighter, for the nuclear mission after the F-16 is politically tricky and – some say – perhaps even undoable given the current state of trans-Atlantic affairs. In that line of thinking, a nuclear-capable F-35 could represent the most trouble-free option for Belgium.

The Belgian decision is sure to be watched closely by Germany. Berlin is in the market to replace its Tornado aircraft, looking for roughly 90 new planes. While officials have said they prefer the Eurofighter, uncertainty surrounding the nuclear-weapons certification of the future fleet remains something of an elephant in the room [emphasis added].

Belgium intends to buy 34 new fighters to replace its aging inventory of F-16s...
https://www.defensenews.com/air/2018/10/22/belgium-reportedly-picks-f-35-for-future-fighter-jet/

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Re: F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF)
« Reply #4305 on: November 14, 2018, 13:50:05 »
Old cybersecurity bug-a-boo (ALIS):

Quote
US Air Force moves to fortify F-35 weak points against hacking

The U.S. Air Force is devoting fresh energy to plugging cybersecurity holes in the F-35's external support systems, as they are deemed the easiest entry points for hackers into the fifth-generation combat jet, according to a key service official.

“It’s a software-based aircraft, and any software-based platform is going to be susceptible to hacking,” Brig. Gen. Stephen Jost, director of the Air Force F-35 Integration Office, told Defense News in an interview at the International Fighter industry conference here.

The service considers the information backbone of the actual airplane – managed by manufacturer Lockheed Martin – relatively safe. That is thanks to what Jost called “multilayer security protections” ranging from secure authentication when crafting mission data packages for each aircraft before takeoff, to pilots punching in personal identification numbers to start up the plane.

The confidence wanes “as you get further from the air vehicle,” Jost said. When taking into account systems like the Autonomic Logistics Information System or the Joint Reprogramming Environment, there are “a lot of nodes of vulnerability that we’re trying to shore up [emphasis added],” he added.

The Autonomic Logistics Information System, or ALIS, is a key application meant to provide unprecedented automation in monitoring the status of the aircraft's components. The Joint Reprogramming Enterprise refers to government software labs compiling collections of updated threat characteristics – Russian tanks, for example – for upload into the aircraft so that its sensors can recognize targets.

Additionally, officials worry about cyber-hardening F-35 flight simulators, which could be attractive targets for hackers seeking information about the plane [emphasis added]. The introduction of wireless applications for easier maintenance on the flight line also could pose new vulnerabilities that must be addressed, Jost said...
https://www.defensenews.com/air/2018/11/14/us-air-force-moves-to-fortify-f-35-weak-points-against-hacking/

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Offline Chris Pook

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Re: F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF)
« Reply #4306 on: November 14, 2018, 15:48:42 »
Quote
“It’s a software-based aircraft world, and any software-based platform is going to be susceptible to hacking,” B

Up until the 1980s we were still using land-lines because wireless systems could not be secured.  They still can't.

Bluetooth and Link16 are accessible.  And subject to EMP.

I believe brains have effective firewalls.
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Re: F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF)
« Reply #4307 on: November 14, 2018, 16:02:15 »
Up until the 1980s we were still using land-lines because wireless systems could not be secured.  They still can't.

Bluetooth and Link16 are accessible.  And subject to EMP.

I believe brains have effective firewalls.

Mine doesn't all the time.  That's why I plug it with my foot so often...

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Re: F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF)
« Reply #4308 on: November 16, 2018, 16:57:46 »
Big order:

US Navy awards Lockheed Martin new F-35 contract

Quote
The US Navy (USN) on 14 November awarded Lockheed Martin an undefinitised contract modification worth nearly USD23 billion for 255 F-35 Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) aircraft.

This modification provides for the production and delivery of 106 aircraft for the Pentagon: 64 F-35A conventional variants, 26 F-35B short take-off and vertical landing (STOVL) models, and 16 F-35C aircraft carrier variants. It also includes 89 aircraft for non-US Department of Defense participants, 71 F-35As and 18 F-35Bs, and 60 F-35As for Foreign Military Sale (FMS) customers.

Lockheed Martin said in a 14 November statement that this contract directs production activity for all aircraft in the previously awarded Low-Rate Initial Production 12 (LRIP 12) contract as well as aircraft for several international customers in LRIPs 12, 13, and 14. LRIP 12, 13, and 14 deliveries will begin in 2020, 2021, and 2022, respectively. The 14 November contract award obligates USD6 billion.

The Pentagon's F-35 Joint Program Office (JPO) said in a statement that this contract award brings the Pentagon into compliance with the law by placing all 10 fiscal year 2018 (FY 2018) Lot 12 and 16 FY 2019 Lot 13 Congressional-addition aircraft on contract.
https://www.janes.com/article/84633/us-navy-awards-lockheed-martin-new-f-35-contract

UK getting more 17 F-35Bs between 2020-22, for total of 35 firm so far--still say plan on 138:
https://www.gov.uk/government/news/uk-to-double-f-35-fleet-with-17-jet-order-defence-secretary-announces

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Re: F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF)
« Reply #4309 on: November 22, 2018, 14:17:46 »
Looks like Norway will have its 52 F-35As (with drag chute, not tail hook https://www.regjeringen.no/en/aktuelt/historisk-forste-gang-kampflyet-f-35-benyttet-bremseskjerm-i-norge/id2590220/ ) operational just as RCAF starts getting its first new fighters, F-35As or otherwise (Levon Sunts of RCI rare Canadian Journo at Trident Juncture):

Quote
Norway’s experience with F-35 fighter jets offers lesson for Canada

As the Canadian government embarks on a much delayed and criticized quest to find a replacement for its ageing fleet of CF-18 Hornet fighter jets, Norway’s saga with the acquisition of F-35 stealth fighters offers Canada a valuable lesson.

The search for a replacement for CF-18 got a new urgency Tuesday after a blistering report by Canada’s auditor general, who lambasted the Liberal government’s handling of the file that could have serious implications for Ottawa’s ability to fulfill its NATO and NORAD obligations.

Just like Ottawa, Oslo was one of the first NATO countries to show interest in the new stealth multirole fighters developed by U.S. defence giant Lockheed Martin.

In June 2009, the Norwegian Parliament decided that the F-35A Lightning II would replace its current fleet of F-16 fighter jets. Unlike Ottawa, despite strong internal opposition, Oslo saw things through.

By 2025, Norway hopes to have a fleet of 52 F-35s.​

Norwegian authorities were hoping to showcase their newest and most expensive defence acquisition in the country’s history at a massive display of NATO’s military might during the official launch of Trident Juncture 2018 exercise on Oct. 30.

But much to the chagrin of dozens of journalists, NATO officials and dignitaries that had assembled on the shores of the Trondheim Fjord in central Norway to watch the display of land, sea and air power, the Norwegian F-35s never showed up.

Lt.-Col. Stale Nymoen, commander of the 332 Squadron of the Royal Norwegian Air Force and one of the first Norwegian pilots to learn to fly the F-35s, said strong crosswinds at the Ørland Air Base forced officials to cancel the planned overflight.

The cancellation of the overflight on an otherwise perfect autumn day had nothing to do with the jet’s capabilities, Nymoen said.

“Seen from my perspective, it’s one of the best fighter aircraft out there,” Nymoen told a roomful of journalists during a briefing at the Ørland Air Base in central Norway earlier this month.

But it has taken even experienced pilots like him years to learn to fly the new fighter jets and, just as importantly, unlearn old habits, Nymoen said.

Not fully operational for now

Norway received its first four F-35s in January of 2017. But all of them were stationed at the Luke Air Force Base in Phoenix, Arizona, where Norwegian, U.S. and Italian pilots trained on the new aircraft.

It wasn’t until November of 2017 that the stealth fighter jets actually arrived for service in Norway, at the Ørland Air Base, which is going through a massive infrastructure upgrade to house the new planes.

Operating and flying them in Norway with its harsh North Atlantic and Arctic climate is a whole new experience, Nymoen said.

“What is different from Luke when we train to operate the aircraft here is temperatures, winter, icy and slippery runways, winds,” Nymoen said. “Those are conditions that we don’t necessarily get to train for when we’re training in the United States.”

And the Norwegian air force is taking a very cautious approach to avoid any accidents, he said.

“We have to learn to crawl before we can walk, and we have to learn to walk before we can run,” Nymoen said.

The first squadron of F-35s is expected to reach initial operational capability in 2019 and full operational capability only in 2025, eight years after the aircraft were delivered to Norway...
http://www.rcinet.ca/eye-on-the-arctic/2018/11/22/norway-f35-fighter-canada-lesson-defence-military-nato-trident-juncture-aircraft-lockheed-martin/

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Re: F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF)
« Reply #4310 on: November 23, 2018, 09:27:41 »
Perhaps one might consider that the base from which the first tranche of RNoAF F-35s are operating, is partly to blame, especially if the runway configuration does not allow aircraft to take off (or ‘scramble’ in urgent intercept situations) in all wind (direction) conditions. ???

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Re: F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF)
« Reply #4311 on: November 23, 2018, 10:18:25 »
F-35As have conducted their first "Elephant Walk" drill for the USAF (video in link). Always love watching these clips. Probably more aircraft on that runway than we have serviceable in the whole country.

https://www.popularmechanics.com/military/aviation/a25240770/us-air-force-has-first-f-35-elephant-walk-mass-drill/

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Re: F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF)
« Reply #4312 on: November 23, 2018, 13:40:32 »
F-35As have conducted their first "Elephant Walk" drill for the USAF (video in link). Always love watching these clips. Probably more aircraft on that runway than we have serviceable in the whole country.

https://www.popularmechanics.com/military/aviation/a25240770/us-air-force-has-first-f-35-elephant-walk-mass-drill/

It's interesting that one of the two wings is a "Reserve" wing. The USAF twins wings/squadrons so that Active and Reserve units share the same aircraft. Interesting to see it applies all the way to F-35s.

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Re: F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF)
« Reply #4313 on: November 23, 2018, 16:14:16 »
It really is unbelievable just how much firepower & tactical capabilities the US can muster for demonstration purposes.  Seeing the runway filled with aircraft like that is always impressive, really puts a visual on just how much firepower is concentrated at that one airbase.  (Similar to the F-16 and F-15 elephant walks.)


Or when the US puts 3 aircraft carriers together, with their escorts, for show of force purposes.  More combat ready planes right there in that formation than any other country on earth could muster, and they haven't even reached the air force yet.  Always humbling & impressive.
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Re: F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF)
« Reply #4314 on: November 23, 2018, 21:58:42 »
It really is unbelievable just how much firepower & tactical capabilities the US can muster for demonstration purposes.  Seeing the runway filled with aircraft like that is always impressive, really puts a visual on just how much firepower is concentrated at that one airbase.  (Similar to the F-16 and F-15 elephant walks.)


Or when the US puts 3 aircraft carriers together, with their escorts, for show of force purposes.  More combat ready planes right there in that formation than any other country on earth could muster, and they haven't even reached the air force yet.  Always humbling & impressive.

I can't remember where I read this, but the largest air force in the world in terms of aircraft was the USAF.  The 2nd largest?  The USN.
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Re: F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF)
« Reply #4315 on: November 23, 2018, 22:50:21 »
I can't remember where I read this, but the largest air force in the world in terms of aircraft was the USAF.  The 2nd largest?  The USN.

Change ‘Air’ to ‘Space’ Force (vis a vis space-capable ‘vehicles’)
and they reverse...think SSBNs... ;)

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Re: F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF)
« Reply #4316 on: November 24, 2018, 11:36:39 »
And USMC aviation is about as big the biggest in any other NATO country:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Marine_Corps_Aviation#Aircraft

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Re: F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF)
« Reply #4317 on: November 24, 2018, 13:22:10 »
Plus USCG (non-combat) aircraft fleet would put some fairly large NATO members to shame:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_equipment_of_the_United_States_Coast_Guard#Aircraft

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Re: F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF)
« Reply #4318 on: November 24, 2018, 16:12:57 »
As for USMC fighters, post from 2013:

Quote
Factoid: USMC Rules, or, Who’s Got the Big Fighter Force?

Something severely about which furiously to think: if the US Marine Corps actually gets the 420 F-35s now planned (340 F-35Bs, 80 F-35Cs) the Marines alone will likely have the largest fighter force in the “Western” world. After the USAF and USN of course...
https://mark3ds.wordpress.com/2013/01/17/mark-collins-factoid-usmc-rules-or-whos-got-the-big-fighter-force/

Actually current plan for Marines is 353 Bs and 67 Cs:
https://www.f35.com/global/participation/united-states

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F35B Lands in Japan
« Reply #4319 on: November 28, 2018, 09:20:42 »

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Re: F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF)
« Reply #4320 on: November 28, 2018, 10:54:13 »
Looks like lots more F35s, As & Bs, for Japan--with a "helicopter destroyers" (remember the RN's "through-deck cruisers"?) turning into a small aircraft carriers:

Quote
Japan to order 100 more F-35 fighters from US
Move comes in response to China's military rise and Trump's pressure

Japan is preparing to order another 100 F-35 stealth fighter jets from the U.S. to replace some of its aging F-15s, according to sources.

The plan can be considered a response to China's military buildup, as well as a nod to U.S. President Donald Trump's call for Tokyo to buy more American defense equipment. Japan already intended to procure 42 of the new fighters.

A single F-35 costs more than 10 billion yen ($88.1 million), meaning the additional order would exceed 1 trillion yen.

Japan's government plans to approve the purchase when it adopts new National Defense Program Guidelines at a cabinet meeting in mid-December. It will also include the F-35 order in its medium-term defense program, which covers fiscal 2019 to fiscal 2023. The government wants to obtain 42 F-35s as successors to its F-4s by fiscal 2024.

The 42 fighters Japan originally planned to buy are all F-35As, a conventional takeoff and landing variant. The additional 100 planes would include both the F-35A and F-35B, which is capable of short takeoffs and vertical landings...

To accommodate the F-35Bs, the government intends to revamp the Maritime Self-Defense Force's JS Izumo helicopter carrier to host the fighters.

...Trump has repeatedly urged Japan to purchase more American hardware and reduce the trade imbalance between the countries. Buying more of the high-priced fighters is a quick way to do that.

In September, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe told Trump, "Introducing high-performance equipment, including American [materiel], is important for our country to strengthen its defense capabilities."
https://asia.nikkei.com/Politics/International-Relations/Japan-to-order-100-more-F-35-fighters-from-US

Listen up, Justin.

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Re: F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF)
« Reply #4321 on: November 28, 2018, 11:15:15 »
Listen up, Justin.
NO.....DON'T!!!       :o

All he'll see is Japan has been flying their F-4 Phantoms since 1968.  Clearly there's no rush to replace our CF-18s.
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Re: F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF)
« Reply #4322 on: November 28, 2018, 13:05:49 »
Or he'll just take on the used F-4's since they're twin engine and obviously superior in terms of reliability, right?
Insert disclaimer statement here....

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Re: F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF)
« Reply #4323 on: November 28, 2018, 14:15:50 »
Well, at some point used F-35s should be available (RAAF?).

Mark
Ottawa
Ça explique, mais ça n'excuse pas.

Offline LoboCanada

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Re: F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF)
« Reply #4324 on: November 28, 2018, 14:36:58 »
At this rate, why not just run the Hornets into the ground (as planned), skip a generation and invest in the UK Tempest program?