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Would Maj Gen MacKenzie have made a good CDS.

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Lew Who?

Author Topic: Major-General Lewis MacKenzie CM, MSC, OOnt, CD  (Read 48299 times)

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Offline Brad Sallows

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Re: New Lewis Mackenzie article
« Reply #25 on: February 23, 2004, 14:54:00 »
If each reserve infantry battalion were to commit a platoon, it would have to commit a platoon commander, platoon WO, and three each section commander and 2I/C.  Presumably these will all be people with time available, or ability to make the time.

After that happens, and while it is being sustained, what do you think are the odds of your BMQ / SQ / MOC / PCF / PLQ etc being cancelled summer after summer due to lack of instructors?

From where I sit, I think we need to put some serious undiverted effort into ensuring our reserve training system is completely capable of sustaining any reserve commitments we intend to make.
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Offline bubba

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Re: New Lewis Mackenzie article
« Reply #26 on: February 23, 2004, 15:45:00 »
hey infanteer my point is we need to be ready for anything from suicide bombers to an all out fight.we got to have the men,gear and means to handle that.helpen to rebuild the infastructure is a major priority,winnin hearts and minds is also good.comin home in one peice is numero uno baby..and as for big lou i always respect a man who is NOT politically correct.oh yeah,about researchin the russians it doesnt matter how many wer there,they still got there asses kicked by men in caves....right or wrong,infanteer bye  
ps.which battalion you with,i was with 1rcr( dont worry im not into stalkin ya im just lookin for some old buds of mine)haha
attitude it ain't on the kit list,but ya better have one!!

Offline Infanteer

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Re: New Lewis Mackenzie article
« Reply #27 on: February 23, 2004, 22:08:00 »
Quote
hey infanteer my point is we need to be ready for anything from suicide bombers to an all out fight
With the limited resources we have, we must focus on what is necessary, not the entire spectrum of conflict.

 
Quote
yeah,about researchin the russians it doesnt matter how many wer there,they still got there asses kicked by men in caves....right or wrong,
I thinked you missed my point.  The Coalition only has 2 Brigades max in country, ISAF in Kabul and an American one in Bagram.  The Russians had 100,000 soldiers in Afghanistan, and yet "got there asses kicked by men in caves".  

Is our force commitment and posture wise based on this compelling evidence you have provided?  That is what I wanted you to come back with.

 
Quote
ps.which battalion you with,i was with 1rcr( dont worry im not into stalkin ya im just lookin for some old buds of mine)haha
Nope, I‘m a western guy...can‘t help you there.
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Re: New Lewis Mackenzie article
« Reply #28 on: February 23, 2004, 23:19:00 »
All I‘m saying is what your asking will never happen unless their is a big war going on.Then the canadian people would have to decide to send in the reserves or whatever. Anyways that day has‘nt come yet and I hope it never does.

Offline Infanteer

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Re: New Lewis Mackenzie article
« Reply #29 on: February 23, 2004, 23:39:00 »
Quote
All I‘m saying is what your asking will never happen unless their is a big war going on
Well, that‘s not the right additude.  Do you think wars of the future will give us three years to mobilize the militia?  We must work on ensuring the militia doesn‘t become the second-rate farm team to the regular force that it is on the way to becoming.
"Overall it appears that much of the apparent complexity of modern war stems in practice from the self-imposed complexity of modern HQs" LCol J.P. Storr

Offline Another Recce Guy

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Re: New Lewis Mackenzie article
« Reply #30 on: February 24, 2004, 05:56:00 »
The man-power arguement is irrelevant as I doubt there will be the political will to carry on such a mission.  The government has been preaching that we are â Å“peacekeepersâ ? rather than war fighters and the rest of the country believes it.  Without a change in opinion and the political will, we will remain what we are; an under-funded branch of Canada Inc.
How will you answer your grandchildren when they what you did in the war?

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Re: New Lewis Mackenzie article
« Reply #31 on: February 24, 2004, 09:07:00 »
It‘s spelled attitude, and another recce man your absolutely right.

Offline bubba

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Re: New Lewis Mackenzie article
« Reply #32 on: February 24, 2004, 10:21:00 »
i see what youre sayin now infanter;and another recce guy summed it up pretty good.catch ya on the next engagement....(OF WORDS)HAHA
attitude it ain't on the kit list,but ya better have one!!

Offline Infanteer

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Re: New Lewis Mackenzie article
« Reply #33 on: February 24, 2004, 13:13:00 »
Quote
It‘s spelled attitude
Uggh, late night editing
"Overall it appears that much of the apparent complexity of modern war stems in practice from the self-imposed complexity of modern HQs" LCol J.P. Storr

Offline bossi

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MGen MacKenzie sets the record straight
« Reply #34 on: June 25, 2004, 07:24:16 »
The effects of Political correctness on Canada's military.
Training isn't the problem
Politics, not a lack of skills, is why our troops are leaving Kabul
 
Lewis MacKenzie
The Ottawa Citizen
Friday, June 25, 2004


Canada turned down a U.S. request last week to extend the tour of our 2,000 soldiers in Kabul until the fall so they could provide a rapid-reaction force during the Afghan elections in September. It's necessary to have such a force on standby to move throughout Afghanistan to deal with the inevitable attempts by terrorists and certain warlords to interfere with the democratic process.

Unfortunately, it was left to a junior Defence department spokesman to explain why Canada would not agree to the U.S. request: "What the Americans are looking for is not exactly what our troops are trained for."

This need not have been such a highly embarrassing admission, as it is blatantly untrue. There are reasons why our contingent is incapable of taking on such a role, but it has nothing to do with a lack of training. On the contrary, they are the best-trained troops for such a mission in the multinational force.

In 2001, immediately following the 9/11 attacks, then-prime minister Jean Chretien pledged that we would stand shoulder-to-shoulder with our U.S. friends in the war on terror, starting with the dispatch of the 3rd battalion of the Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry to join the U.S. brigade operating out of Kandahar.

Unfortunately, he neglected to tell President George W. Bush that we would only be with them for six months. As the alarm went off indicating the six months were up, he brought the battalion home, indicating that we did not have the resources to replace or extend the 800 soldiers.

Yet a few months later, when it looked like the U.S. was going to intervene in Iraq and Canada would be asked to participate, Mr. Chretien ordered 4,000 soldiers (2,000 per six-month mission) to serve with the International Security Assistance Force in Kabul for a year. Magically, the soldiers were found (and conveniently the shelves were emptied for any potential Canadian contribution to Iraq).

Canada would not be directly involved in the war on terror, but would contribute to the establishment of some degree of security in and around Kabul. This would help Afghan President Hamid Karzai and his government survive, at least in the capital, as his movements outside of Kabul are few and far between due to the risks involved.

Regrettably, a considerable degree of inflexibility was built into the organization of the Canadian contingent and a very un-Canadian solution was chosen. It was decided that the soldiers would live in a large encampment with creature comforts previously unknown and deemed unnecessary on other missions -- Internet cafe, exercise tents, individual living compartments, a sewer and water system, extensive air-conditioning, etc.

Despite the fact that Afghani-stan qualified as an operational theatre, civilian contractors were brought in to run the logistics support system for the soldiers. Meals, accommodation, ammunition control, overall maintenance of vehicles and equipment were all centralized in a static civilian component that could not deploy outside of Kabul.

Erroneously assuming that the Canadian mission to Afghanistan would not change and that the umbilical cord to the civilian supply system would always be available, the infantry battalion was required to leave behind in Canada its own internal supply capability provided by its service support company -- which normally provides the services offered by the civilian contractors in a more austere manner, but is considerably more flexible and mobile and can deploy into high-risk areas.

I can appreciate that our government might not want to respond positively to the recent U.S. request. To do so would mean that we would take on an expanded role that would see our soldiers move throughout Afghanistan during the election process to confront any attempts to interfere with the democratic process. Any increased support for the United States during the current election would be seen as a negative for the government, given its anti-U.S. Iraq policy rhetoric.

When National Defence was told to come up with an excuse for our not agreeing to the U.S. request for us to rejoin the war against terror, the response should not have been that our troops were not trained for such a role. An honest -- but politically unacceptable -- response would have gone something like this:

"Sorry, the need to find more savings in our defence budget forced us to contract out the logistics support for our soldiers to a static civilian organization and that restricts them to operations less than 70 kilometres from Kabul. We also have a massive administration and security overhead in Kabul, which means that out of our 2,000 personnel, only about 300 are available for taking any potential fight to the enemy. That reality is extremely unfortunate because the 3rd Battalion Royal 22 Regiment soldiers in their light infantry role would be as good as any elite unit in the world at tracking down and eliminating the terrorists who would threaten the election process and the security of Afghanistan. They spend most of their time training for such a task and would prefer it to patrolling the streets of Kabul."

The lessons we can learn from this are: (1) we should think of our soldiers' morale and pride when politically correct excuses are made for all the world to see; and, (2) we should not fool around with the well-proven organization of an infantry battalion on the assumption that a particular role in a particular mission area will not change. It will, as it should but can't in Afghanistan.

Lewis MacKenzie is a retired major-general in the Canadian Forces.
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Offline Lance Wiebe

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Re: MGen MacKenzie sets the record straight
« Reply #35 on: June 25, 2004, 08:44:03 »
This serves to highlight one of the major problems in our Forces.

Our very own NDHQ is so politically orientated, that they are simply disgusting.

This is supposed to be OUR LEADERS!

Bunch of spineless a**holes.

A major shakeup HAS to be done at NDHQ, and get rid of that idiot Henault and all of his lapdogs, and place some real leaders in command of the fine men and women that serve our nation.
"It is the soldier, who salutes the flag, who served beneath the flag, whose coffin is draped by the flag, who allows the protestor to burn the flag." - Charles M. Province

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Re: MGen MacKenzie sets the record straight
« Reply #36 on: June 25, 2004, 09:00:18 »
While I appreciate him standing up for our troops like that, what we really need is for CURRENT leaders to stand up to stuff like this. The quote about the soldiers not being trained for what was needed came from a defence spokesperson, probably a jr bureaucrat I would assume. Why on earth does our military tolerate such politically motivated bs (this being but a small example)? Isn't the whole point of having senior officers so that military matters can be handled by military personnel rather than paper pushers? Sometimes it feels like we might as well just cut off rank progression at Col and fill all the top brass spots with civil servants to save on the cost of gold thread.   :akimbo:

(perhaps a bit more bitter than I need to be due to being woken up almost three hours early for no reason)

Offline Guardian

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Re: MGen MacKenzie sets the record straight
« Reply #37 on: June 25, 2004, 13:39:09 »
The last time the senior generals and admirals in this country stood up for doing the right thing was during the Cuban Missile crisis. Some admirals defied Diefenbaker's orders to do nothing, saw that the Soviets were deploying submarines to threaten shipping off the East Coast of North America, and put the Atlantic fleet on high alert. They even deployed a carrier battlegroup to protect the US East Coast.

The defence minister at the time (Harkness?) then quietly put the whole military on alert.

The Liberals were in opposition at this time, and believe it, they noticed the initiative taken by the admirals.

When they later formed a government, they took action to ensure that the military leadership in this country would never go against political direction again. This action was carried out by a guy named Paul Hellyer - unification. Stripped of their tradition and their pride in their service identities, and with the civilian DND headquarters merging with the military high command to form NDHQ (albeit over several years), the senior leaders quickly learned to be docile and keep their heads down.

With that historical example in mind, I can see why the senior leaders might be reticent to take a stand. Someone with some pull has to do it eventually, though, or it's only going to get worse...

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Re: MGen MacKenzie sets the record straight
« Reply #38 on: June 25, 2004, 18:25:16 »
When they later formed a government, they took action to ensure that the military leadership in this country would never go against political direction again. This action was carried out by a guy named Paul Hellyer - unification. Stripped of their tradition and their pride in their service identities, and with the civilian DND headquarters merging with the military high command to form NDHQ (albeit over several years), the senior leaders quickly learned to be docile and keep their heads down.

With that historical example in mind, I can see why the senior leaders might be reticent to take a stand. Someone with some pull has to do it eventually, though, or it's only going to get worse...

Hellyer unified the forces, yes, but he did not merge the military and civilian aspects into NDHQ. He's actually spoken out in opposition to this merge:

Quote
The problem began in 1974, seven years after I left the Department, when Prime Minister Trudeau and Defence Minister Donald MacDonald decided to merge the military and civilian headquarters. This was a very bad decision because oil and water don't mix. It was the beginning of what has been called the "civilianization" of the forces.
from here (see foreign affairs - military)

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Re: MGen MacKenzie sets the record straight
« Reply #39 on: June 26, 2004, 03:56:14 »
Along with the already stated reasons, both by this gentleman and the official statement from the government/military, I think that the fact that soldiers would be put in more danger than they already are might have played a factor. Right now they are stationed in the relative security of Kabul, and I am sure that there is fear that if Canadian soldiers are sent out into the countryside to hunt down the actual terrorists rather than patrolling Kabul neighborhoods, that the bodybags will start to pile up. No matter how few casualties that brings, the media would be all over it like a bee on honey. And when the media portrays something in a bad light, it tends to have the same effect on Canadians. When the coffins started coming home, the public would turn against the mission and I assume we would see protests telling the government to bring our troops home.

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Re: MGen MacKenzie sets the record straight
« Reply #40 on: June 26, 2004, 15:16:17 »
"While I appreciate him standing up for our troops like that, what we really need is for CURRENT leaders to stand up to stuff like this."



 
The problem is today about speaking up is you run the risk of losing a promotion or your job. Then again some people are just gold diggers that will be yes men that will attempt to benefit themselves through never saying anything contradictory even though something is wrong.

Offline Sheep Dog AT

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Re: MGen MacKenzie sets the record straight
« Reply #41 on: June 26, 2004, 23:57:22 »
I love that man.  I hope the PC's get in and he is put in charge of the military.
Apparently infamous for his one liners.
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Offline Gunner

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Re: MGen MacKenzie sets the record straight
« Reply #42 on: June 27, 2004, 00:12:15 »
Quote
The last time the senior generals and admirals in this country stood up for doing the right thing was during the Cuban Missile crisis. Some admirals defied Diefenbaker's orders to do nothing, saw that the Soviets were deploying submarines to threaten shipping off the East Coast of North America, and put the Atlantic fleet on high alert. They even deployed a carrier battlegroup to protect the US East Coast.

Actually I would argue that the Admirals didn't defy Diefenbaker's orders rather they were implementing what they considered previously agreed upon alliance and treaty responsibilities.  While they did what they considered right...they were negligent in remembering that the government is the final authority in this regard.

Quote
  While I appreciate him standing up for our troops like that, what we really need is for CURRENT leaders to stand up to stuff like this. The quote about the soldiers not being trained for what was needed came from a defence spokesperson, probably a jr bureaucrat I would assume.

Gents, you have very short (and limited) memories of our past.  What about MGen Cam Ross resigning in 2003 due to policy differences with the Liberal government over CA deployment to Afghanistan (vice Iraq).  Before that was a plethora of Patricia Generals (Vernon, Mackenzie, et al) who pulled the pin due to the disbandment of the CAR.  Prior to that was General Anderson who resigned as CDS when the Liberals cancelled the EH 101 in 1993.  How about the famous Admirals revolt in the late 60s and early 70s.  If members of the military can't recall the sacrifices of our leadership, why would any civilians?  I believe it was Cretin or one of his lackeys that made fun of retired senior officers speaking out against government decisions.  Where was the outrage at the Liberals blatant disregard for an officer's loyalty?

Its easy to pass the buck onto senior leadership but what have you done?
Had a wonderful ~26 years in the military and still miss it.

Offline Tebo

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Re: MGen MacKenzie sets the record straight
« Reply #43 on: June 27, 2004, 04:51:37 »
Quote
.....if Canadian soldiers are sent out into the countryside to hunt down the actual terrorists rather than patrolling Kabul neighborhoods, that the bodybags will start to pile up. No matter how few casualties that brings, the media would be all over it like a bee on honey. And when the media portrays something in a bad light, it tends to have the same effect on Canadians. When the coffins started coming home, the public would turn against the mission and I assume we would see protests telling the government to bring our troops home.

Do you seriously think the Canadian media would dishonour fallen Canadian soldiers defending the right for democratic election in Afghanistan by saying we should turn tail and run away?  Balance the death stories with our victories and coverage of the election.  If Canada does not have the will and stomach to let the military DO ITS JOB  why do we even bother deploying?

Offline Chris Pook

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Re: MGen MacKenzie sets the record straight
« Reply #44 on: June 30, 2004, 00:54:06 »
In support of MGen MacKenzie's position of   the value of the structure of the Traditional   Infantry Battalion structure, and those that advocate the advantage offered by tanks I am posting this article from today's Sun in Britain.

Quote
Our Boys' unseen war
 
 
 
Target ... snipers on alert against a
rebel attack at British Army outpost
Pictures: DAN CHARITY
 
 
 
 
 
 
From TOM NEWTON DUNN
Defence Editor
at Camp Abu Naji, Iraq

THE first mortar bomb exploded with a loud clump as I tucked into my British Army fry-up for breakfast yesterday.
Everyone dived for cover in the tented canteen â ” as the second whistled over our heads and landed a few metres outside the base's northern wall.

â Å“Welcome to Camp Abu Naji,â ? quipped Sergeant Chris Broome, 35.

â Å“Now you know what it's really like up here.â ?

This is the most dangerous posting in the world for Brit forces.

And The Sun has joined the 1,000-strong Princess of Wales's Royal Regiment Battle Group, who are protecting the lawless badlands of Maysan province, 150 miles north of Basra.

For two months religious extremists have waged a war against the PWRR that is almost unseen by the British public.

Fighting is so intense, Our Boys have been attacked more times than any Army unit since the Korean War.

The men arrived on April 17 and have had an incredible 320 â Å“contactsâ ? with the enemy â ” around five a day.

These are anything from a single hand grenade tossed in front of a Land Rover to the three-day battle for the province's capital Al Amarah last month.

Our Boys have fired 30,000 rounds against the rebels. They have lost a dozen vehicles and had 28 soldiers wounded. But, incredibly, there have been no deaths.

At least 100 insurgents â ” from rebel cleric Moqtada al-Sadr's Mehdi army â ” have been killed.

Combat has ranged from Challenger II tanks firing high explosive shells to the first bayonet charge by British troops since the Falklands War.

Lt Col Matt Maer, commanding officer of the PWRR's 1st Battalion, said: â Å“My men have walked into a maelstrom of violence the like of which none of us has faced before.

â Å“But they have reacted superbly and faced hardship with astonishing courage, endurance and humour. They are true heroes.â ?

The CO added: â Å“Before we arrived, we weren't expecting two months of war.


 
Heavyweight ... tank crushes weapons
 


â Å“I told my men to expect a tour like no other, but I had very little idea how true that was going to be.

â Å“And it is a forgotten war. People back home have very little idea of what is going on here because we are so remote.â ?

It is the first taste of combat for many of these men from the PWRR, nicknamed The Tigers.

Coalition troops throughout Iraq battled al-Sadr's Shiite Muslim group during the April uprising. Fighting calmed after a few weeks, EXCEPT in desperately poor Maysan.

The hardcore Mehdi in the area number around 300, but ranks can be swelled up to 3,000.

Near misses occur with terrifying regularity.

Lance Corporal John Barr, 34, from A Company, poked his head out of his Warrior armoured vehicle â ” and nearly had it blown off by a rocket-propelled grenade.

The RPG missed his head by inches during a street ambush in Al Amarah.

L/Cpl Barr, from Chichester, Sussex, said: â Å“It's amazing we haven't lost anybody with the stuff they've chucked at us.

â Å“I thought this would be a simple peace keeping tour. But as soon as we got here it turned into something just like Black Hawk Down. It's been my first time under fire, but one of the things I take great pride in is that I've proved I can handle it.

â Å“The whole unit has. This regiment has a very proud history. Here in Iraq, we've been given a chance to show this generation is up to it too.

â Å“Everyone shares the risks and everyone's played their part.â ?

The soldiers who have seen the most action are from 8 platoon, C Company, led by 2nd Lt. Richard Deane, of Co Londonderry.

The subaltern has had 12 of his 25 men wounded in combat during a succession of ambushes.

Bullet holes and blast marks pock mark the platoon's Warriors.

Brave 2nd Lt. Deane, 22, has been wounded twice himself, once getting shrapnel in his face and another time ending up unconscious during an RPG strike on his Warrior turret.

He said: â Å“Before we came out, all the lads were really looking forward to getting stuck in. Now I think we'll all be delighted if we never see another round fired until we get home.

â Å“A lot of young blokes have been forced to grow up pretty quickly. I'm looking forward to getting home for some leave in nine days and seeing my three-year-old daughter again.â ?


 
Battle ground ... where Brits are fighting rebels
 


Maysan province's volatility is not new to British troops.

Just 20 miles down the road from Camp Abu Naji is Majar al Kabir, where a mob massacred six Royal Military Policemen.

Most men fly into the base by Chinook helicopter because the road from Basra is considered too dangerous for anything but large convoys supported by armour.

The Hercules flight Sun photographer Dan Charity and I arrived on four days ago was the most terrifying either of us has had.

The RAF transport plane veered violently from side to side on its final approach to make itself less of a target for an RPG attack.

Troops are also battling the blistering Iraqi summer and strong winds that kick up daily dust clouds.

They have seized huge caches of rifles, heavy machine guns, mortars and RPGs during raids.

These have been crushed under the tracks of a 60-tonne Challenger 2.

Fifteen miles outside the main camp is an outpost jokingly dubbed The Alamo because it has been attacked so often.

Y Company have been in fortified Cimic House in the heart of enemy territory in Al Amarah since the start of the tour.

Major Justin Featherstone's 130 men have had 180 mortar rounds fired at them and got into 73 gun fights with the Mehdi army.

Three snipers man the rooftop bunker at all times on the lookout for the next attack. Company Sergeant Major Dale Norman, of Gosport, Hants, said: â Å“I was mortared nine times and shot at twice on my 35th birthday here. I'll never forget it.â ?

Sergeant Dan Mills, 35, had a miracle escape when he was saved by his body armour during an ambush.

The soldier was shot in the upper back as he directed fire in Al Amarah.

Sgt Mills, from Middlesex, said: â Å“I was knocked on to my face by the bullet. It felt like being kicked by a horse and I knew I had been shot.

â Å“But when I felt for hot sticky blood, there was none. I couldn't understand it, so I got up and carried on with the contact.

â Å“It was only when we got back to base that a mate saw the hole in my body armour,

â Å“He had a dig around and pulled out a 7.62mm AK47 bullet. I am a very lucky boy.â ?


Baking shot


 
Chink of light ... baking tray
was mangled by mortar
 


LUCKY cook Alex Whitlam, 22, holds up a shrapnel-hit baking tray â ” after a mortar bomb smashed into his kitchen at â Å“The Alamoâ ? outpost in Al Amarah.

Lance Corporal Whitlam, from Norwich, walked out to fetch extra rations 20 SECONDS before the strike.

Two hours later he had cooked an evening meal for the men.

He said: â Å“I cleaned up and got on with my job. You have to, even if someone is trying to kill you.â ?
 

http://www.thesun.co.uk/article/0,,5-2004301024,00.html
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Offline Infanteer

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Re: MGen MacKenzie sets the record straight
« Reply #45 on: June 30, 2004, 04:20:30 »
Quote
LUCKY cook Alex Whitlam, 22, holds up a shrapnel-hit baking tray â ” after a mortar bomb smashed into his kitchen at â Å“The Alamoâ ? outpost in Al Amarah.

Lance Corporal Whitlam, from Norwich, walked out to fetch extra rations 20 SECONDS before the strike.

Two hours later he had cooked an evening meal for the men.

He said: â Å“I cleaned up and got on with my job. You have to, even if someone is trying to kill you.â ?

Hey, what do you know, a combat cook.  Probably alot more efficient than locals hired and supervised by some civvie contractor taking at least Sergeants pay.
"Overall it appears that much of the apparent complexity of modern war stems in practice from the self-imposed complexity of modern HQs" LCol J.P. Storr

Offline Ex-Dragoon

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Re: MGen MacKenzie sets the record straight
« Reply #46 on: June 30, 2004, 05:09:23 »
The Prince of Wales Regiment wasn't that Sharpes regiment?   ;D
I will leave your flesh on the mountains and fill the valleys with your carcasses. I will water the land with what flows from you, and the river beds shall be filled with your blood. When I snuff you out I will cover the heavens and all the stars will darken. Ezekiel 32:5-7
Tradition- Just because you've always done it that way doesn't mean it's not incredibly stupid
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ags281

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Re: MGen MacKenzie sets the record straight
« Reply #47 on: June 30, 2004, 06:14:15 »
"I thought this would be a simple peace keeping tour. But as soon as we got here it turned into something just like Black Hawk Down."

Hmm... so tell me again how taking the teeth out of our forces is justifiable for a focus on peacekeeping missions?

Offline Sheep Dog AT

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Re: MGen MacKenzie sets the record straight
« Reply #48 on: June 30, 2004, 10:42:31 »
Bayonet charge.  boy I bet there will be some well deserved stories coming from that incident.
Apparently infamous for his one liners.
Oh Giggity Well...........Giggity

Offline Chris Pook

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Re: MGen MacKenzie sets the record straight
« Reply #49 on: June 30, 2004, 11:34:05 »

Ex-Dragoon wrote:

Quote
The Prince of Wales Regiment wasn't that Sharpes regiment? 


'Mazing what a good publicist can do for you, eh.b :D
"Wyrd bið ful aræd"