Author Topic: The Khadr Thread  (Read 605290 times)

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Offline Hamish Seggie

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Re: The Khadr Thread
« Reply #800 on: September 28, 2008, 21:49:38 »
OWDU and Tess thank you very much!! This little SOB needs to go back to Afghanistan or wherever the f&ck he came from.

Let him take his chances there.
Freedom Isn't Free   "Never Shall I Fail My Brothers"

“Do everything that is necessary and nothing that is not".

Offline GAP

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Re: The Khadr Thread
« Reply #801 on: September 28, 2008, 21:59:05 »
Well if we just keep on going the way we are, the US will try him and serve time in their prison systems....I don't think life will be very comfortable for him there, at best......at worst.....he's fresh meat for awhile.

ps: he'd better hope it's a civilian prison system he gets put into, if it's military, I suspect everything wished on him will come true....
« Last Edit: September 28, 2008, 22:01:49 by GAP »
Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I´m not so sure about the universe

Offline Thucydides

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Re: The Khadr Thread
« Reply #802 on: September 28, 2008, 23:56:41 »
Fortunately an excellent potential replacement lives just down the street and has always been willing to serve when called.

Say, don't you live just up the road as well?  ;)

Well if we just keep on going the way we are, the US will try him and serve time in their prison systems....I don't think life will be very comfortable for him there, at best......at worst.....he's fresh meat for awhile.

ps: he'd better hope it's a civilian prison system he gets put into, if it's military, I suspect everything wished on him will come true....

Actually, I would expect he will have his person and rights much more rigorously protected at Fort Levensworth than in any civilian prison. I also expect the American MP's and soldiers in Kansas will uphold his rights until 2029 or so.....
Dagny, this is not a battle over material goods. It's a moral crisis, the greatest the world has ever faced and the last. Our age is the climax of centuries of evil. We must put an end to it, once and for all, or perish - we, the men of the mind. It was our own guilt. We produced the wealth of the world - but we let our enemies write its moral code.

Offline Yrys

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Re: The Khadr Thread
« Reply #803 on: October 16, 2008, 13:58:23 »
There is a french television show on Omar Khadr, at Radio-Canada, tonight at 20h, Eastern Time :

Le cauchemar d'Omar Khadr

(the nightmare of Omar Khadr)
Louvre website

"Happiness is beneficial for the body, but it is grief that develops the powers of the mind."  Marcel Proust

Offline geo

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Re: The Khadr Thread
« Reply #804 on: October 16, 2008, 15:42:57 »
... in many ways, it is a hell of his own making.

Dream on my friend
Chimo!

Offline Hamish Seggie

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Re: The Khadr Thread
« Reply #805 on: October 16, 2008, 17:27:05 »
Rant time for a CSM!!
This little piece of crap doesn't belong anywhere near good Canadians. Let Jack and his bunch molly coddle and baby sit this little viper. With donations from the supporters of this murdering little b@stard.  :rage:
Freedom Isn't Free   "Never Shall I Fail My Brothers"

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Offline axeman

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Re: The Khadr Thread
« Reply #806 on: October 16, 2008, 18:47:08 »
I am not a christian  but I just wish I could have the name of this person ~ I may want to shake her hand! I respect the faith's of other peoples! I respect other peoples rights to disagree ~ but I do not respect anyone who hides anywhere behind a cowardly mask! Behind anonymity ... you may not like what this says and that is okay ... that is what members of many families died fighting to preserve! Your right to agree or to disagree!


This was written by a Canadian woman, but oh how it also applies to the
U.S., U.K. and Australia


THIS ONE PACKS A FIRM PUNCH

Here is a woman who should run for Prime Minister!

Written by a housewife in New Brunswick , to her local newspaper. This
is one ticked off lady.

'Are we fighting a war on terror or aren't we? Was it or was it not
started by Islamic people who brought it to our shores on September 11, 2001
and have continually threatened to do so since?

Were people from all over the world, not brutally murdered that day,
in downtown Manhattan , across the Potomac from the nation's capitol and in
a field in Pennsylvania ?

Did nearly three thousand men, women and children die a horrible,
burning or crushing death that day, or didn't they?

And I'm supposed to care that a few Taliban were claiming to be
tortured by a justice system of the nation they come from and are fighting
against in a brutal insurgency.

I'll start caring when Osama bin Laden turns himself in and repents
for incinerating all those innocent people on 9/11.

I'll care about the Koran when the fanatics in the Middle East start
caring about the Holy Bible, the mere belief of which is a crime punishable
by beheading in Afghanistan .

I'll care when these thugs tell the world they are sorry for hacking
off Nick Berg's head while Berg screamed through his gurgling slashed
throat.

I'll care when the cowardly so-called 'insurgents' in Afghanistan come
out and fight like men instead of disrespecting their own religion by
hiding in mosques.

I'll care when the mindless zealots who blows themselves up in search
of nirvana care about the innocent children within range of their suicide
bombs.

I'll care when the Canadian media stops pretending that their freedom
of speech on stories is more important than the lives of the soldiers on
the ground or their families waiting at home to hear about them when
something happens.

In the meantime, when I hear a story about a CANADIAN soldier roughing
up an Insurgent terrorist to obtain information, know this:

I don't care.

When I see a wounded terrorist get shot in the head when he is told not
to move because he might be booby-trapped, you can take it to the bank:

I don't care.

When I hear that a prisoner, who was issued a Koran and a prayer mat,
and fed 'special' food that is paid for by my tax dollars, is complaining
that his holy book is being 'mishandled,' you can absolutely believe in
your heart of hearts:

I don't care.

And oh, by the way, I've noticed that sometimes it's spelled 'Koran'
and other times 'Quran.' Well, Jimmy Crack Corn you guessed it,

I don't care!!

If you agree with this viewpoint, pass this on to all your E-mail
friends. Sooner or later, it'll get to the people responsible for this
ridiculous behaviour!

If you don't agree, then by all means hit the delete button. Should
you choose the latter, then please don't complain when more atrocities
committed by radical Muslims happen here in our great Country!
And may I add:

'Some people spend an entire lifetime wondering if they made a
difference in the world. But, the Soldiers don't have that problem.'

I have another quote that I would like to add, AND.......I hope you
forward all this.

One last thought for the day:

Only five defining forces have ever offered to die for you:

1. Jesus Christ

2. The Canadian Soldier.

3. The British Soldier.

4. The US Soldier, and

5. The Australian Soldier

One died for your soul, the other 4 for your freedom.


YOU MIGHT WANT TO PASS THIS ON, AS MANY SEEM TO FORGET ALL OF THEM.

AMEN!

And just in case you weren’t all aware, sometimes putting a face to a name makes it real.  These are just the Canadian soldiers that gave their lives for other’s freedom…

 
 First name
 Last name
 Rank
 Unit
 Province
 Date of incident
 

 Prescott
 Shipway
 Sergeant
 2nd Battalion, Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry
 Saskatchewan
 September 7, 2008
 

 Andrew
 Grenon
 Corporal
 2nd Battalion, Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry
 Ontario
 September 3, 2008
 

 Chad
 Horn
 Private
 2nd Battalion, Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry
 Alberta
 September 3, 2008
 

 Mike
 Seggie
 Corporal
 2nd Battalion, Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry
 Manitoba
 September 3, 2008
 

 Shawn
 Eades
 Sergeant
 1 Combat Engineer Regiment
 Ontario
 August 20, 2008
 

 Stephan
 Stock
 Sapper
 1 Combat Engineer Regiment
 British Columbia
 August 20, 2008
 

 Dustin
 Wasden
 Corporal
 1 Combat Engineer Regiment
 Saskatchewan
 August 20, 2008
 

 Erin
 Doyle
 Master Corporal
 3rd Battalion, Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry
 British Columbia
 August 11, 2008
 

 Josh
 Roberts
 Master Corporal
 2nd Battalion, Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry
 Saskatchewan
 August 9, 2008
 

 James
 Arnal
 Corporal
 2nd Battalion, Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry
 Manitoba
 July 18, 2008
 

 Colin
 Wilmot
 Private
 1 Field Ambulance
 Alberta
 July 6, 2008
 

 Brendan
 Downey
 Corporal
 Military Police Detachment
 Saskatchewan
 July 4, 2008
 

 Jonathan
 Snyder
 Captain
 1st Battalion, Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry
 British Columbia
 June 7, 2008
 

 Richard
 Leary
 Captain
 2nd Battalion, Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry
 Ontario
 June 3, 2008
 

 Michael
 Starker
 Corporal
 15th Field Ambulance
 Alberta
 May 6, 2008
 

 Terry
 Street
 Private
 2nd Battalion, Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry
 Quebec
 April 4, 2008
 

 Jason
 Boyes
 Sergeant
 2nd Battalion, Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry
 Manitoba
 March 16, 2008
 

 Jérémie
 Ouellet
 Bombardier
 1st Royal Canadian Horse Artillery
 Quebec
 March 11, 2008
 

 Michael
 Hayakaze
 Trooper
 Lord Strathcona's Horse (Royal Canadians)
 Alberta
 March 2, 2008
 

 Étienne
 Gonthier
 Corporal
 5e Régiment du génie de combat
 Quebec
 January 23, 2008
 

 Richard
 Renaud
 Trooper
 12e Régiment blindé du Canada
 Quebec
 January 15, 2008
 

 Eric
 Labbé
 Corporal
 2nd Battalion, Royal 22e Régiment
 Quebec
 January 6, 2008
 

 Hani
 Massouh
 Warrant officer
 2nd Battalion, Royal 22e Régiment
 Quebec
 January 6, 2008
 

 Jonathan
 Dion
 Gunner
 5e Régiment d'artillerie légère du Canada
 Quebec
 December 30, 2007
 

 Nicolas
 Beauchamp
 Corporal
 5th Field Ambulance, 5 Area Support Group
 Quebec
 November 17, 2007
 

 Michel
 Lévesque
 Private
 3rd Battalion, Royal 22e Régiment
 Quebec
 November 17, 2007
 

 Nathan
 Hornburg
 Corporal
 The King's Own Calgary Regiment
 Alberta
 September 24, 2007
 

 Raymond
 Ruckpaul
 Major
 Armoured Corps, The Royal Canadian Dragoons
 Ontario
 August 29, 2007
 

 Christian
 Duchesne
 Master corporal
 5th Field Ambulance, 5 Area Support Group
 Quebec
 August 22, 2007
 

 Mario
 Mercier
 Master Warrant officer
 2nd Battalion, Royal 22e Régiment
 Quebec
 August 22, 2007
 

 Simon
 Longtin
 Private
 3rd Battalion, Royal 22e Régiment
 Quebec
 August 19, 2007
 

 Jordan
 Anderson
 Corporal
 3rd Battalion, Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry
 Nunavut
 July 4, 2007
 

 Cole
 Bartsch
 Corporal
 3rd Battalion, Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry
 Alberta
 July 4, 2007
 

 Colin
 Bason
 Master corporal
 The Royal Westminster Regiment
 British Columbia
 July 4, 2007
 

 Matthew
 Dawe
 Captain
 3rd Battalion, Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry
 Ontario
 July 4, 2007
 

 Jefferson
 Francis
 Captain
 1st Royal Canadian Horse Artillery
 New Brunswick
 July 4, 2007
 

 Lane
 Watkins
 Private
 3rd Battalion, Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry
 Manitoba
 July 4, 2007
 

 Stephen
 Bouzane
 Corporal
 3rd Battalion, Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry
 Newfoundland and Labrador
 June 20, 2007
 

 Christos
 Karigiannis
 Sergeant
 3rd Battalion, Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry
 Quebec
 June 20, 2007
 

 Joel
 Wiebe
 Private
 3rd Battalion, Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry
 Alberta
 June 20, 2007
 

 Darryl
 Caswell
 Trooper
 Royal Canadian Dragoons
 Ontario
 June 11, 2007
 

 Darrell
 Priede
 Master corporal
 Army News Team, 3 Area Support Group
 Ontario
 May 30, 2007
 

 Matthew
 McCully
 Corporal
 2nd Canadian Mechanized Brigade Group Headquarters and Signal Squadron
 Ontario
 May 25, 2007
 

 Anthony
 Klumpenhouwer
 Master corporal
 Canadian Special Operations Forces Command
 Ontario
 April 18, 2007
 

 Patrick
 Pentland
 Trooper
 Royal Canadian Dragoons
 New Brunswick
 April 11, 2007
 

 Allan
 Stewart
 Master corporal
 Royal Canadian Dragoons
 New Brunswick
 April 11, 2007
 

 David
 Greenslade
 Private
 2nd Battalion, Royal Canadian Regiment
 New Brunswick
 April 8, 2007
 

 Kevin
 Kennedy
 Private
 2nd Battalion, Royal Canadian Regiment
 Newfoundland and Labrador
 April 8, 2007
 

 Donald
 Lucas
 Sergeant
 2nd Battalion, Royal Canadian Regiment
 Newfoundland and Labrador
 April 8, 2007
 

 Brent
 Poland
 Corporal
 2nd Battalion, Royal Canadian Regiment
 Ontario
 April 8, 2007
 

 Christopher
 Stannix
 Corporal
 Princess Louise Fusiliers
 Nova Scotia
 April 8, 2007
 

 Aaron
 Williams
 Corporal
 2nd Battalion, Royal Canadian Regiment
 New Brunswick
 April 8, 2007
 

 Kevin
 Megeney
 Corporal
 1st Battalion, The Nova Scotia Highlanders (North)
 Nova Scotia
 March 6, 2007
 

 Robert
 Girouard
 Chief Warrant officer
 1st Battalion, Royal Canadian Regiment
 New Brunswick
 November 27, 2006
 

 Albert
 Storm
 Corporal
 1st Battalion, Royal Canadian Regiment
 Ontario
 November 27, 2006
 

 Darcy
 Tedford
 Sergeant
 1st Battalion, Royal Canadian Regiment
 Alberta
 October 14, 2006
 

 Blake
 Williamson
 Private
 1st Battalion, Royal Canadian Regiment
 Ontario
 October 14, 2006
 

 Mark
 Wilson
 Trooper
 Royal Canadian Dragoons
 Ontario
 October 7, 2006
 

 Craig
 Gillam
 Sergeant
 Royal Canadian Dragoons
 Newfoundland and Labrador
 October 3, 2006
 

 Robert
 Mitchell
 Corporal
 Royal Canadian Dragoons
 Ontario
 October 3, 2006
 

 Josh
 Klukie
 Private
 1st Battalion, Royal Canadian Regiment
 Ontario
 September 29, 2006
 

 Glen
 Arnold
 Corporal
 2nd Field Ambulance
 Ontario
 September 18, 2006
 

 David
 Byers
 Private
 2nd Battalion, Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry
 Ontario
 September 18, 2006
 

 Shane
 Keating
 Corporal
 2nd Battalion, Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry
 Saskatchewan
 September 18, 2006
 

 Keith
 Morley
 Corporal
 2nd Battalion, Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry
 Manitoba
 September 18, 2006
 

 Mark
 Graham
 Private
 1st Battalion, Royal Canadian Regiment
 Ontario
 September 4, 2006
 

 William
 Cushley
 Private
 1st Battalion, Royal Canadian Regiment
 Ontario
 September 3, 2006
 

 Frank
 Mellish
 Warrant officer
 1st Battalion, Royal Canadian Regiment
 Nova Scotia
 September 3, 2006
 

 Richard
 Nolan
 Warrant officer
 1st Battalion, Royal Canadian Regiment
 Newfoundland and Labrador
 September 3, 2006
 

 Shane
 Stachnik
 Sergeant
 2nd Combat Engineer Regiment
 Alberta
 September 3, 2006
 

 David
 Braun
 Corporal
 2nd Battalion, Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry
 Saskatchewan
 August 22, 2006
 

 Andrew
 Eykelenboom
 Corporal
 1st Field Ambulance
 British Columbia
 August 11, 2006
 

 Jeffrey
 Walsh
 Master corporal
 2nd Battalion, Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry
 Saskatchewan
 August 9, 2006
 

 Raymond
 Arndt
 Master corporal
 The Loyal Edmonton Regiment
 Alberta
 August 5, 2006
 

 Kevin
 Dallaire
 Private
 1st Battalion, Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry
 Alberta
 August 3, 2006
 

 Vaughan
 Ingram
 Sergeant
 1st Battalion, Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry
 Newfoundland and Labrador
 August 3, 2006
 

 Bryce
 Keller
 Corporal
 1st Battalion, Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry
 Saskatchewan
 August 3, 2006
 

 Christopher
 Reid
 Corporal
 1st Battalion, Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry
 Nova Scotia
 August 3, 2006
 

 Francisco
 Gomez
 Corporal
 1st Battalion, Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry
 Alberta
 July 22, 2006
 

 Jason
 Warren
 Corporal
 The Black Watch (Royal Highland Regiment) of Canada
 Quebec
 July 22, 2006
 

 Anthony
 Boneca
 Corporal
 Lake Superior Scottish Regiment
 Ontario
 July 9, 2006
 

 Nichola
 Goddard
 Captain
 1st Royal Canadian Horse Artillery
 Alberta
 May 17, 2006
 

 Matthew
 Dinning
 Corporal
 2nd Military Police Platoon
 Ontario
 April 22, 2006
 

 Myles
 Mansell
 Bombardier
 5th (British Columbia) Field Artillery Regiment
 British Columbia
 April 22, 2006
 

 Randy
 Payne
 Corporal
 CFB/ASU Wainwright Military Police Platoon
 Ontario
 April 22, 2006
 

 William
 Turner
 Lieutenant
 Land Force Western Area Headquarters
 Ontario
 April 22, 2006
 

 Robert
 Costall
 Private
 1st Battalion, Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry
 Ontario
 March 29, 2006
 

 Paul
 Davis
 Corporal
 2nd Battalion, Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry
 Nova Scotia
 March 2, 2006
 

 Timothy
 Wilson
 Master corporal
 2nd Battalion, Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry
 Alberta
 March 2, 2006
 

 Glyn
 Berry
 Diplomat
 Department of Foreign Affairs, Canada
 Wales
 January 15, 2006
 

 Braun
 Woodfield
 Private
 2nd Battalion, Royal Canadian Regiment
 Nova Scotia
 November 24, 2005
 

 Jamie
 Murphy
 Corporal
 1st Battalion, Royal Canadian Regiment
 Newfoundland and Labrador
 January 27, 2004
 

 Robbie
 Beerenfenger
 Corporal
 3rd Battalion, Royal Canadian Regiment
 Ontario
 October 2, 2003
 

 Robert
 Short
 Sergeant
 3rd Battalion, Royal Canadian Regiment
 New Brunswick
 October 2, 2003
 

 Ainsworth
 Dyer
 Corporal
 3rd Battalion, Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry
 Quebec
 April 18, 2002
 

 Richard
 Green
 Private
 3rd Battalion, Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry
 Nova Scotia
 April 18, 2002
 

 Marc
 Léger
 Sergeant
 3rd Battalion, Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry
 Ontario
 April 18, 2002
 

 Nathan
 Smith
 Private
 3rd Battalion, Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry
 Nova Scotia
 April 18, 2002
 
 
I'm not saying to kill all the stupid people . .. Just remove the warning labels and let nature run it's course

Offline Hamish Seggie

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Re: The Khadr Thread
« Reply #807 on: October 16, 2008, 19:17:03 »
Thank you very much from the bottom of my broken heart. Mike Seggie is my son and was KIA in Afghanistan. Your words are comforting to me. :salute:
Freedom Isn't Free   "Never Shall I Fail My Brothers"

“Do everything that is necessary and nothing that is not".

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Re: The Khadr Thread
« Reply #808 on: November 23, 2008, 08:55:53 »
Latest numbers, from Angus Reid - full results attached as .pdf below.

Canadians Ponder Repatriation of Omar Khadr
Angus Reid Global Monitor : Polls & Research, 23 Nov 08
News release link

Adults in Canada remain divided over the fate of Omar Khadr, according to a poll by Angus Reid Strategies released by the Toronto Star. 42 per cent of respondents would demand Khadr’s repatriation to face due process under Canadian Law, while 37 per cent would leave Khadr to face trial by military commission in Guantanamo Bay.

In the event U.S. president-elect Barack Obama shuts down the Guantanamo Bay detention facility, 48 per cent of respondents would repatriate Khadr, while 41 per cent would transfer him to the United States to face federal prosecution there.

Omar Khadr—a Canadian born in Toronto and the son of al-Qaeda fighter Ahmed Said Khadr—was detained by the United States military in Afghanistan in July 2002, after allegedly throwing a grenade that killed a special forces medic. Omar Khadr was 15 at the time. He was transferred to the Guantanamo Bay detention facility in October 2002.

In June 2007, U.S. military judge Peter Brownback dismissed the charges of murder and terrorism against Omar Khadr, claiming he was authorized to try "unlawful enemy combatants" exclusively. An earlier review had deemed Omar Khadr was an "enemy combatant." However, the case against Omar Khadr was reopened in September 2007, when the new Court of Military Commission Review ruled that Brownback’s decision was in error.

In April, William Kuebler—Khadr’s military lawyer—argued during a pre-trial hearing that the deadly grenade may have been thrown by an American soldier. In July, a report revealed that Canadian officials were aware of the harsh treatment that Khadr was subjected to in Guantanamo. According to the document, the U.S. military "deprived" Khadr of sleep for weeks in order to make him "more amenable and willing to talk."

On Nov. 20, Canadian foreign affairs minister Lawrence Cannon appeared to rule out any change in policy, saying, "He is being held and it’s our government’s intention to follow and respect the process that’s in place and, of course, to respect American sovereignty on this issue."

Khadr’s military trial is expected to start on Jan. 26, 2009.

Polling Data
As you may know, Canadian citizen Omar Khadr has spent more than six years in the Guantanamo Bay detention facility, charged with throwing a grenade that killed a U.S. soldier in a July 2002 firefight in Afghanistan. Khadr, the son of al-Qaeda fighter Ahmed Said Khadr, was 15 when the alleged incident took place. Which of these policy options would you prefer in this case?
Nov. 2008
Jul. 2008
Apr. 2008

Demanding Khadr’s repatriation to face due process under Canadian Law
42%
37%
43%

Leaving Khadr to face trial by military commission in Guantanamo Bay
37%
38%
38%

Not sure
20%
26%
19%


As you may know, United States president-elect Barack Obama has criticized the existence of the Guantanamo Bay detention facility, and there is speculation that he may order its closure. If the Guantanamo Bay facility is indeed shut down, which of these policy options would you prefer in the case of Omar Khadr?

Repatriating Khadr to face due process under Canadian law
48%

Transferring Khadr to the United States to face federal prosecution there
41%

Not sure
11%

Source: Angus Reid Strategies / Toronto Star
Methodology: Online interviews with 1,002 Canadian adults, conducted on Nov. 14 to Nov. 15, 2008. Margin of error is 3.1 per cent.
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Offline ARMY_101

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Re: The Khadr Thread
« Reply #809 on: November 23, 2008, 11:22:02 »
I remain convinced that Khadr should be facing prosecution through the United States court system.  This is someone who supposedly killed a U.S. soldier in a U.S.-occupied area, so they can be the ones to hold his trial and find whether or not he is guilty.  Bringing him back to Canada is only going to allow people to run to Canada and claim sanctuary from prosecution.

Offline Snafu-Bar

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Re: The Khadr Thread
« Reply #810 on: November 23, 2008, 11:38:38 »

Considering that Khadr was taken into custody in Afghanistan by the US military, he IS thier property to do with as they see fit. Either they will put him through the system and seek to get a sentence on him or they will hand him over to Canadian authorities to deal with. Either way he WILL be put through the system in some capacity or other.
 
 If he kept in the states and is found guilty of the soldiers death then you can bet your bottom the US will seek to having him put in one of thier finest institutions for the rest of his existence or one step further and seek the death penalty for his actions.

 If he comes "home" to Canada and is put through the system anything can happen, my guess would be the bleeding hearts club will seek to get him a diamond encrusted soother, pat him on the back and turn him loose with a nice big multi-million dollar we're sorry cheque.  ::)

 Cheers.
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Offline ARMY_101

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Re: The Khadr Thread
« Reply #811 on: November 23, 2008, 12:00:46 »
[I don't care Editorial from Canadian Woman]

It seems to be on a slippery slope of equivocating all middle eastern people into terrorist groups.  If innocent people have been unfairly detained and abused, it is quite uncaring and unfair to say that you don't care because of the alleged connection between terrorism and these people.

Don't get me wrong, if they have done something wrong then get the information from them and ensure they pay for what they did.  But if they were just an innocent person who had nothing to do with any crime, turning a blind eye and saying "I don't care" will only allow for worse occurrences to take place without anyone questioning why.

Offline geo

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Re: The Khadr Thread
« Reply #812 on: November 23, 2008, 13:00:29 »
IMHO, if the US gevernment intends to prosecute the fella..... DO IT!
Six years - it has dragged on waaaay too long & the longer it takes, the more of a farce it becomes.
Chimo!

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Re: The Khadr Thread
« Reply #813 on: November 23, 2008, 14:37:45 »
IMHO, if the US gevernment intends to prosecute the fella..... DO IT!
Six years - it has dragged on waaaay too long & the longer it takes, the more of a farce it becomes.


well honestly they can drag it out for 6 more and I would not shed a tear.

 frig him and the whole family.

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Offline geo

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Re: The Khadr Thread
« Reply #814 on: November 23, 2008, 17:06:22 »
That's the good thing about living in a democracy, everyone is allowed to have his say & should feel free to express it...

if for nothing else, the US Government, with it's position that everyone should be entitled to a speedy trial - should get their act together and put the fella on trial.
Chimo!

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Re: The Khadr Thread
« Reply #815 on: January 14, 2009, 21:40:36 »
Khadr charges will be dropped after inauguration: lawyers

NEWYORK -- Charges against Omar Khadr will be dropped "without prejudice" shortly
after Barack Obama's inauguration Jan. 20 as president, the Canada-born terror
suspect's U.S. military lawyers predicted Monday.

The technical arrangement will effectively suspend the Jan. 26 start date for his trial
before a military commission at the U.S. naval base in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

Mr. Obama's advisers say one of the new president's first duties in office will be to
order the closing of the Guantanamo detention camps. Under the Bush administration,
up to 80 detainees were to eventually face trial, including Khalid Shaikh Mohammed (KSM),
who has said he was responsible for planning the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks "from A to Z."

Mr. Khadr, 22, is accused of killing a U.S. soldier in a firefight when he was 15, and his
trial is the only one currently scheduled to begin. "We can't imagine that the new president
will move to close the camps without also addressing the military commissions," said
Rebecca Synder, one of Mr. Khadr's Pentagon-appointed lawyers. "Otherwise, it may seem
that he may end up giving KSM a fairer trial than Omar Mr. Khadr, a former child soldier."

Effective suspension of the charges will result in increased pressure on Prime Minister
Stephen Harper to find a formula to return Toronto-born Mr. Khadr to Canada, according
to navy Lt.-Cmdr. Bill Kuebler, Mr. Khadr's lead Pentagon-appointed lawyer.

"I still think it is appropriate that he returns under certain supervisory conditions, but I also
believe that it is possible the window for achieving that is now closing," he said. "We don't
know exactly what Mr. Obama will do regarding this case. But there is a chance right now
to ensure an arrangement is in place that gets Omar the things he needs for rehabilitation."

Harper said Monday he would wait to see what the Mr. Obama administration does with
Mr. Khadr before deciding whether Canada's position should be changed. "We have a very
different situation with Mr. Mr. Khadr. He is accused of a very serious thing and there is a
legal process," he said.

With Mr. Obama weighing an imminent decision to order the closure of the U.S. military
prison at Guantanamo Bay, leading human-rights agencies on Monday appealed for him
to halt the looming trial. At a news conference in Washington, Senator Romeo Dallaire
and several leading Guantanamo critics warned Mr. Obama will betray his campaign
promises if he allows the 22-year-old Canadian to stand trial on Jan. 26.

In a letter to Mr. Obama, the group argued Mr. Khadr is a child soldier who should not
face military justice at Guantanamo. "Really, what we're asking for here is not even for
president-elect Mr. Obama to make a judgment about Omar Mr. Khadr's innocence or
guilt -- or about his case -- but for his administration to call a moratorium, to freeze the
proceedings," said Marsha Levick, the legal director of the Juvenile Law Center,
a Washington-based advocacy group.

If the trial opens as planned, "it would be an enormous disappointment for those of us
who have watched the campaign and trusted president-elect Mr. Obama's remarks
with respect to his own views on the military proceedings," Ms. Levick said.

The future of the Guantanamo military prison looms as one of the biggest facing
Mr. Obama in the days following his inauguration. The Associated Press reported Monday
the incoming president is expected to issue an executive order within his first week in
office ordering the prison closed, and to determine how best to relocate its 250 remaining
detainees.

But that may leave unresolved the pressing question of Mr. Khadr's trial in a military
commission process Mr. Obama himself has declared a "dangerously flawed legal" system.
"If the proceedings against Omar Mr. Khadr go on, and go forward Jan. 26, (Mr. Khadr)
will in fact be the first child tried in the United States for war crimes in our history," said
Ms. Levick.

A military commission judge last summer dismissed arguments by defence lawyers,
who cited the UN optional protocol on children in armed conflict as prohibiting Mr. Khadr
from facing a war-crimes tribunal. The U.S. signed the protocol in 2000.

Brooke Anderson, Mr. Obama's national security spokeswoman, declined to comment on
Mr. Khadr's case Monday.

Sen. Dallaire, a former Canadian military general who has led efforts in Parliament to r
epatriate Mr. Khadr, said his staff has been in touch with Mr. Obama's transition team
about the case. With Harper's government refusing to intervene, Sen. Dallaire said he's
still hopeful Mr. Obama will order Mr. Khadr released into Canadian custody.

"I have gotten nowhere with the Canadian government. Although we have attempted
to convince the prime minister that standing aloof from this process is inappropriate ...
he refused to open up a conversation with the Americans in regards to Mr. Khadr,"
Sen. Dallaire said. "If the Canadians don't want to ask for him ... then maybe the
solution is [for Mr. Obama] to offer him to the Canadians."

The spokeswoman for Foreign Affairs Minister Lawrence Cannon said Monday that
Canada's position on Mr. Khadr has not changed. "We will be following with interest
any developments under the incoming administration of president-elect Mr. Obama,"
said Cannon's spokeswoman, Catherine Loubier.

Liberal foreign affairs critic Bryon Wilfert repeated the Opposition's call for Harper to
ask for Mr. Khadr to be repatriated, just as western countries, such as Australia and
Britain, have done with their nationals in Guantanamo. And he reiterated that Mr. Khadr
should "face justice" from Canadian courts for the crimes he's accused of, and not simply
be set free. "He should come home -- period. Whether Guantanamo is closed or not is
a secondary issue," Wilfert told Canwest News Service.

"Closing Guantanamo isn't going to be done overnight, in any event. Mr. Obama's team
is going to have to look very closely at it." Mr. Khadr's legal allies include five leading
international human-rights organizations -- Amnesty International, Human Rights Watch,
the American Civil Liberties Union, Human Rights First and the Coalition to Stop the Use
of Child Soldiers -- that made separate written appeals to Mr. Obama on Monday.

"We urge that, upon taking office, you act quickly to suspend the military commissions,
drop the military commission charges against Mr. Khadr, and either repatriate him for
rehabilitation in Canada or transfer him to federal court and prosecute him in accordance
with international juvenile justice and fair trial standards," the groups said in their letter.

Also speaking on Mr. Khadr's behalf was Ishmael Beah, a former child soldier in Sierra
Leone who last year rose to international prominence with the publication of a bestselling
memoir about his wartime experiences.

Mr. Khadr's conviction for war crimes would signal a double standard in the way American
policy treats child soldiers, Beah said. "Are we sending a message out there that says if
a child that engages in war and is forced in war in any other country than the United States,
then we are able to forgive them?" Beah asked. "But if a child is used in war in ways that it
takes the life of a U.S. citizen, then we are not able to look at them as a child? That is not
the kind of legal precedent we want to set."

During his presidential campaign, Mr. Obama was a fierce critic of both the Guantanamo
prison and the military commission system established by the Bush administration to try
enemy combatants detained after the 9/11 terror attacks. But only last weekend, Mr. Obama
said his pledge to close the prison likely would prove more difficult than he expected, and that
it would be "a challenge" to shut it down during his first 100 days in office.

"It is more difficult than I think a lot of people realize," he told ABC News. Mr. Obama said
he was struggling with "how to balance creating a process that adheres to rule of law, habeas
corpus, basic principles of Anglo-American legal system, but doing it in a way that doesn't result
in releasing people who are intent on blowing us up."

With files from Mike Blanchfield, Canwest News Service
Louvre website

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Offline geo

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Re: The Khadr Thread
« Reply #816 on: January 15, 2009, 08:24:40 »
What kind of sentence does a criminal get for murder / manslaughter in the states ?

If the sentence is anything like 12 - 15 years...
do the conviction ASAP, sentencing usually doubles the value of the time served prior to conviction....

And return him to Afghanistan where they caught him in the 1st place.....
Chimo!

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Re: The Khadr Thread
« Reply #817 on: January 15, 2009, 08:31:07 »
My solution:

The Government of Canada should take responsibilty for this poor young misguided person. Bring him back to Canada.

THEN: Deport him and his terrorist family to their country of origin.

I think you all know why I feel this way.

Sorry for the rant.
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Offline George Wallace

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Re: The Khadr Thread
« Reply #818 on: January 15, 2009, 12:09:30 »
What kind of sentence does a criminal get for murder / manslaughter in the states ?

If the sentence is anything like 12 - 15 years...
do the conviction ASAP, sentencing usually doubles the value of the time served prior to conviction....

And return him to Afghanistan where they caught him in the 1st place.....
>:D

Sounds like a "Catch and Release" policy that would be more effective than bringing him to Canada.
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Re: The Khadr Thread
« Reply #819 on: January 21, 2009, 02:50:44 »
well honestly they can drag it out for 6 more and I would not shed a tear.
 frig him and the whole family.

- At least the kid had the balls to put his *** on the line for what he believed in.  I'll take him anyday over the Limosine-Fedayeen who bad-mouth Canada while selling drugs in Toronto but wouldn't dare go toe-to-toe with NATO in the sandbox.
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Offline Thucydides

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Re: The Khadr Thread
« Reply #820 on: January 21, 2009, 15:09:30 »
Interesting tie in to another case:

http://ezralevant.com/2009/01/charles-adler-show-today.html

Quote
Charles Adler Show today
By Ezra Levant on January 20, 2009 12:43 PM | Permalink | Comments (12) | Trackback

I'll be on Charles Adler's national radio show today at 4 p.m. ET, 2 p.m. MT, to talk about Omar Khadr's statement that Maher Arar was indeed at a terrorist training camp in Afghanistan.
I've just re-read Kevin Steel's story in the Western Standard. It's amazing reading. Here are some excerpts:

The commission, headed by Justice Dennis O'Connor, ran for two-and-a-half years and cost taxpayers $23 million. Yet in all that time and for all that money, no medical evidence was presented that demonstrated Arar had been physically tortured. No doctor testified. A psychiatrist did testify about the psychological effects of torture, but on physical torture, none.

Arar was never cross-examined on his allegations because he did not testify at the commission that bears his name.

...While he was imprisoned, Arar, who was closely monitored by the Syrians, made only one negative statement to the Canadian consular officials who visited him. On Aug. 14, 2003, he gave them the dimensions of his cell. "Being kept in a three-by-six-by-seven-foot cell obviously constitutes psychological torture, which is worse, and that was Maher's whole point; it's not about the beatings, it's, 'I can't survive living in this cell another day,'" says Pither. (David Milgaard spent 22 years in a Canadian jail after being wrongfully convicted of murder. He received $10 million for his wasted years, slightly less than Arar got for his ten months.)

...And though the Arar commission went out of its way to stress that Arar is innocent, it also underplayed facts that demonstrated why Canadian police were suspicious of him back in 2001--his frenetic cross-border travel, for instance, and his residence in Framingham, Mass., are barely mentioned in the 1,200-page final report or in the 12,000-plus pages of testimony.




…in his Nov. 4, 2004, statement to the press, Arar told of being whipped with a two-inch-thick electrical cable. "They hit me with it everywhere on my body. They mostly aimed for my palms, but sometimes missed and hit my wrists; they were sore and red for three weeks," Arar states. Arar alleges his interrogators also hit him on his hips and lower back. "They used the cable on the second and third day, and after that mostly beat me with their hands, hitting me in the stomach and on the back of my neck, and slapping me on the face. Where they hit me with the cables, my skin turned blue for two or three weeks, but there was no bleeding," Arar stated. According to his own timeline, these horrors occurred between Oct. 11 and Oct. 16, 2002.

Yet the entire time he was in the Syrian prison, the Canadian officials who visited with Arar saw no signs of physical abuse. As for his condition when he got out, one Canadian eyewitness-- speaking to the Western Standard on condition of anonymity--who saw Arar in Syria only moments after his release from jail, put it this way: "If you call not being able to shower for 10 months torture, then I guess he was tortured. But from what I saw, he didn't look like he had been tortured."

Arar received a total of nine consular visits during his 10-month ordeal. The first of these was only one week after the alleged beatings stopped, so that would have been well before Arar, in his own words, says his injuries healed. On Oct. 23, 2002, Leo Martel, an experienced consular official, met with Arar. The diplomat described the visit in a note to his superiors written immediately afterward. The Syrians were present at all times and obligated everyone to speak in Arabic. He reported that Arar walked normally; the two men shook hands and Martel described the handshake as "normal" and stated that Arar did not withdraw his hand. The meeting lasted a half-hour. Martel wrote that Arar "looked like a frightened person," yet appeared otherwise healthy, but added, "Of course, it is difficult to assess." He saw no bruising. The commission report states, "Mr. Martel saw no apparent signs of sore or red wrists or palms, and no blue skin around Mr. Arar's face or neck."

Martel would visit Arar eight more times, sometimes alone, sometimes in the company of others. All his consular reports were made public at the Arar commission. No signs of physical abuse were ever observed. Even after Arar was released, he did not speak of beatings. On the plane returning to Canada, when Martel asked Arar about physical torture, all he would say was, "They have other means.

John Thompson, president of the Mackenzie Institute and an expert on terrorism, has met people who have been tortured in exactly the same way that Arar alleges. To him, Arar's account sounds fabricated. "If you're being whipped, there are permanent marks. A cable like that would leave scars, it would split the skin. Also, if you were being beaten around the hands with it, it would break your fingers. That's what these things do," he says. Ten years ago, he met an Iraqi who had been beaten with a two-inch electrical cable. "He lifted up his shirt and showed me the welter of scars on his back, and then pulled his arm out of his sleeve and there were marks on the upper arm. Whipping leaves some horrific scars."

…Unfortunately, torture allegations are quite common. Even the 18 accused terrorists who were arrested in Ontario last summer on charges of plotting to blow up the CBC and CN Tower and behead the prime minister claimed they were tortured at the Maplehurst Detention Centre. Such accusations have become standard fare; when training its recruits, al Qaeda teaches them to make a claim of torture as soon as they are put before a magistrate, or the media. And refugees have been making claims of torture all over the world for eons. In order to sort the real charges from the exaggerations or lies, in 1999, the United Nations created the Manual on the Effective Investigation and Documentation of Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment, otherwise known as the Istanbul Protocol. Its 84 pages are full of detailed instructions. Nowhere, in the whole of the Arar story--in mountains of press clips, in Arar's lawsuits, in the O'Connor commission itself--is the Istanbul Protocol mentioned. Specifically, there is no reference to it in the Toope Report, and that might seem strange because, as the commission's press release made everyone aware, Toope has experience with the UN. Toope, now president of the University of British Columbia, did not return a request for an interview.

… Arar and his wife, Monia Mazigh, an economics professor and one-time candidate for the NDP, have said on several occasions that he has never been to Afghanistan and never had any desire to go there. Like the torture claims, this statement has gone unchallenged. At one point, while Arar was incarcerated and after the confession, Canada's Foreign Affairs department contacted the Arar family in order to obtain any documentation establishing Maher's whereabouts that year. They produced none. And it's not like the RCMP or CSIS were incapable of finding information; early in the RCMP investigation they turned up a gun permit Arar obtained in 1992. In fact, there was never any evidence presented at the Arar commission as to his whereabouts in that year. Instead, there were lengthy discussions downplaying any significance attached to being in Afghanistan at that time. In his final report, O'Connor skirts the whole issue and instead presents a chapter titled "Background Information on the Afghanistan Camps," in which the reader is treated to a little history primer, the conclusion of which can be summarized as: just because someone might have been at a terrorist camp in Afghanistan in 1993, doesn't necessarily mean they were a terrorist.


I really have just one question left: will Canadian taxpayers be getting our $10.5 million back?
Dagny, this is not a battle over material goods. It's a moral crisis, the greatest the world has ever faced and the last. Our age is the climax of centuries of evil. We must put an end to it, once and for all, or perish - we, the men of the mind. It was our own guilt. We produced the wealth of the world - but we let our enemies write its moral code.

Offline geo

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Re: The Khadr Thread
« Reply #821 on: January 21, 2009, 17:40:19 »
Interesting tie in to another case:
http://ezralevant.com/2009/01/charles-adler-show-today.html
Might sound interesting Except..... they have such a dubious pedigree that they might just as well be a faerie tail
Chimo!

Offline NL_engineer

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Re: The Khadr Thread
« Reply #822 on: January 22, 2009, 17:42:53 »
Quote
just because someone might have been at a terrorist camp in Afghanistan in 1993, doesn't necessarily mean they were a terrorist.

What kind of dumb a** wrote this?
Note to any Taliban and AQ personnel on the Form:  ALL SUICIDE VESTS AND EXPLOSIVE DEVICES MUST BE TESTED TO INSURE THEY WORK BEFORE GOING AFTER A TARGET.

This is a measure to save any embarrassment that may occur when your explosive device, does not function as it is intended to.

It has come to my attention that these measures are not being followed, so for all Taliban; please refer to the above.

Thank you for your cooperation

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Re: The Khadr Thread
« Reply #823 on: January 22, 2009, 17:59:46 »
What kind of dumb a** wrote this?

If it waddles like a duck, quacks like a duck, has feathers, and swims on the surface of water, allbeit happliy at that, its a duck, but not in the eyes of the author of that quote.

Very frustrating.

Cheers,

Wes

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Offline proudnurse

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Re: The Khadr Thread
« Reply #824 on: January 23, 2009, 04:01:42 »
And somewhere out there, a Medic's family deserves justice for thier son

Edited to ad an article I've found

Kitchener Waterloo Record Thurs; Jan 22, 2009 Reproduced in accordance with fairdealings.
article link: http://news.therecord.com/article/475370

Obama halts Khadr trial
Brennan Linsley, The Associated Press

GUANTANAMO BAY, CUBA

A tiny crack appeared in Ottawa's long-standing reluctance to bring Omar Khadr home yesterday after a military judge called a 120-day halt to the Guantanamo Bay prisoner's war-crimes trial at the behest of U.S. President Barack Obama.

And, a senior Obama aide tells The Associated Press that Obama plans to sign an executive order today to close the Guantanamo Bay detention centre within a year and halt military trials of terror suspects held there.

Obama, his presidency just hours old, ordered prosecutors to request the hiatus late Tuesday in order to allow for time to review the case of Khadr and 244 other detainees held at this infamous prison, according to prosecution documents.

That move prompted signals from Defence Minister Peter MacKay that the federal Conservative government would take Obama's cue and re-examine its oft-repeated position that due process in the U.S. should be allowed to run its course.

"Everyone involved in these cases will be reassessing their positions,'' MacKay said in Ottawa.

That appeared to bring out Kory Teneycke, a spokesperson for Prime Minister Stephen Harper, who reiterated the government's more familiar message: Khadr faces serious charges and the U.S. process must run its course.

"We are just not going to get into hypotheticals around different scenarios,'' Teneycke said.

"We'll simply wait and see what comes forward from the United States around this issue. We'll address other questions if and when they arise.''

Khadr's defence, which had earlier pushed hard for the charges to be stayed, did not oppose yesterday's motion.

"The practical effect of this ruling is to pronounce this military process dead,'' Lt.-Cmdr. Bill Kuebler, Khadr's lawyer, said minutes after the judge, Col. Patrick Parrish, granted the continuance in a single-sentence ruling.

Reached in Toronto, Khadr's older sister expressed mixed feelings at the news.

"I'm glad my brother is not going to trial, but I really would have preferred he was coming home, and he's not,'' Zaynab Khadr said in an interview. "He has been there for six years. Delaying justice is not justice at all.''

Liberal Leader Michael Ignatieff called on Prime Minister Stephen Harper's Conservative government to take the necessary steps to bring Khadr back to Canada.

"I don't pronounce on his innocence or guilt, I just think enough is enough,'' Ignatieff said in Montreal. "I want to make it clear -- I don't have an ounce of anti-Americanism in my blood. I have great respect for the constitutional and legal traditions of the United States of America, but I think Guantanamo has been a disgrace to those traditions.''

In addition to Khadr's trial, Obama's order also resulted in a temporary halt to the proceedings for the five accused co-conspirators in the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. Family members of 9/11 victims, gathered in Guantanamo to watch the proceedings, were outraged.

"Mr. Obama has offered up the lives of almost 3,000 Americans on the . . . altar of political correctness,'' said an angry Don Arias, whose brother Adam died in the 2001 attacks on the World Trade Center.

The options now open to Obama, who during his election campaign promised to shut down Guantanamo Bay and who has since signalled doing so would be among his first priorities, include attempting to try the detainees in a U.S. federal or military court.

He could also establish a special terrorist court, although most observers consider that unlikely, in part because Democrats in Congress oppose such a move.

Detainees not considered dangerous could be sent back home.

The Toronto-born Khadr, 22, is charged under an internationally condemned military commissions process with killing an American soldier in violation of the rules of war.

It is alleged he tossed the hand grenade that killed Sgt. Chris Speer following a four-hour firefight near Khost, Afghanistan, in July 2002, when he was just 15.

Khadr is the lone westerner still held at Guantanamo, but Harper has steadfastly refused to get involved, saying the proceedings here had to run their course.

Harper can no longer "hide behind'' that argument, Kuebler said.

The defence had wanted all charges stayed against Khadr and the other detainees, but Kuebler said he'll settle for the suspension, which lasts until May 20, 2009, provided it leads to serious discussions about getting Khadr home.

"He is anxious, he is nervous, he doesn't quite know what is going to happen -- none of us does,'' Kuebler said of his client.

Guantanamo Executive Order

(Draft, dated January XX, 2009)

Draft says: "In view of the significant concerns raised by these detentions, both within the United States and internationally, prompt and appropriate disposition of the individuals currently detained at Guantanamo and closure of the facility would further the national security and foreign policy interests of the United States and the interests of justice.''

Applies to: 245 men at Guantanamo.

What could happen next: 60 to 120 Guantanamo prisoners may be considered low-threat detainees and transferred to other countries, either for rehabilitation or release. Other detainees could be imprisoned in their home countries. The 120-day suspension could be extended indefinitely if the review concludes that current military trial system should end. If that happens, the cases likely will be heard by federal courts under long-standing military or civilian criminal law.
« Last Edit: January 23, 2009, 04:07:43 by proudnurse »
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