Author Topic: Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread  (Read 1252362 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline MarkOttawa

  • Army.ca Fixture
  • *****
  • 73,300
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 6,558
  • Two birthdays
    • The 3Ds Blog
Re: Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread
« Reply #3550 on: July 19, 2019, 13:55:32 »
Chicoms doing it to Aussies too--great kidnappers and a lovely bunch of people. And the fellow lived in the US:
Quote
Australia 'deeply disappointed' by detention of citizen in China

Canberra on Friday [July 19] said it was "deeply disappointed" with the criminal detention of an Australian-Chinese writer in China, demanding Beijing release him if he is being held for "his political views".

Foreign Minister Marise Payne said Australia had received confirmation Friday that Yang Henjun, held by Chinese authorities since January, had been transferred to criminal detention, apparently on national security grounds.

In a strongly worded statement, Payne said the government had raised Yang's case repeatedly with Beijing at senior levels and written twice to China's foreign minister requesting a "fair and transparent" resolution, as well as access to his lawyer.

"This has not occurred," Payne said.

"The government has expressed concern about Dr Yang’s welfare and the conditions under which he is held," she added.

Payne said she had still not received clarification as to why Yang, also known as Yang Jun, was being held.

"If he is being detained for his political views, then he should be released," she said.

The author and democracy advocate was detained had been held in a secret location since being detained in January shortly after making a rare return to China from his current residence in the United States.

The foreign ministry in Beijing said then he was suspected of endangering "China's national security" -- which often implies espionage allegations.

Until this week he was being held under "residential surveillance at a designated location" (RSDL), a form of detention that allows authorities to hold people for serious crimes.

Payne confirmed Friday that he had been transferred to a criminal detention centre.
https://www.afp.com/en/news/3954/australia-deeply-disappointed-detention-citizen-china-doc-1ix13h3

More detail at earlier story:

Quote
Yang Hengjun: Australian writer detained in China expected to be charged, lawyer says
Yang, who has been detained for six months, is expected to be charged with endangering national security
...
Yang, a Chinese public intellectual who has long advocated for democratic reforms in China, has been detained for the last six months in an unknown location in China...

Yang’s case could complicate already cooling ties between Australia and China, over concerns about potential Chinese interference in national affairs, Huawei and human rights...
https://www.theguardian.com/world/2019/jul/18/yang-hengjun-australian-writer-detained-in-china-expected-to-be-charged-lawyer-says

Meanwhile that interference in Canada:

Quote
Falun Gong incident more reason Canada needs system to handle complaints of Chinese intimidation: Amnesty
Ottawa handles the issue with a scattershot approach that leaves possible victims unclear how to get help, Amnesty International's Canadian head says

The alleged harassment of a Falun Gong practitioner at Ottawa’s Dragon Boat Festival is one more reason the federal government needs dedicated officials to handle complaints of Chinese-government intimidation, says a prominent human-rights watchdog.

The incident involving practitioner Gerry Smith was “very troubling,” and part of a wider pattern of coercion by Beijing’s representatives, said Alex Neve, Canadian head of Amnesty International.

But Ottawa continues to handle the issue with a scattershot approach that leaves possible victims unclear how to get help, he said.

“When something happens, they don’t really know where should they turn to report this,” he said. “Is this a criminal law matter, is this a security and intelligence matter, is this just a diplomatic incident? Is it all of the above, is it none of the above?”

Neve said Amnesty has been urging federal authorities for some time to create a single point of contact for people and groups “who feel intimidated by Chinese government.”

Such a system would also help Ottawa track the extent of the problem, he said.

Smith says he briefly entered the festival grounds last month with the nine-year-old son of a friend, and was ordered to remove a T-shirt bearing the words Falun Dafa — another name for Falun Gong — by the festival’s CEO. He said John Brooman told him he didn’t want the event politicized, and mentioned that it was co-sponsored by the Chinese embassy. Brooman also threatened to remove a group of other Falun Gong followers doing exercises outside the festival in city-owned Mooney’s Bay park, Smith charges.

A city councillor said he also saw some Falun Gong supporters handing out leaflets to people entering the festival.

China has a well-documented history of persecuting the group — seen as a threat to Communist control — while Canadian authorities have deemed the Falun Gong a spiritual movement deserving of human-rights protections...
https://nationalpost.com/news/falun-gong-incident-more-reason-canada-needs-system-to-handle-complaints-of-chinese-intimidation-amnesty

Mark
Ottawa

Ça explique, mais ça n'excuse pas.

Offline MarkOttawa

  • Army.ca Fixture
  • *****
  • 73,300
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 6,558
  • Two birthdays
    • The 3Ds Blog
Re: Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread
« Reply #3551 on: August 01, 2019, 11:40:06 »
One wonders how involved the Chinese consulate general in Vancouver, and various CPP United Front Work Department-supported local Chinese organizations, are in promoting pro-China actions on campus:

Quote
Hong Kong protests tension spills over onto Simon Fraser University campus

Tensions over the ongoing protests in Hong Kong are growing globally, spilling over onto university campuses as far afield as Brisbane, Auckland — and now to Burnaby.

At Simon Fraser University, a controversy over three “Lennon Walls” — fixtures where people can post notes of support or inspirational wishes — shows how tensions related to increasingly violent protests in Hong Kong may get harder to manage on Canadian campuses. At least one academic is calling on all involved — both students and universities — to take a more formal, respectful approach.

“There are currently two walls,” said Joel Wan, founder of Vancouver Hong Kong Political Activists, a weeks-old, student organization whose Facebook page has posts about the situation at SFU.

The original Lennon Wall, located outside the main Bennett Library, was “repeatedly destroyed and rebuilt, with post-it notes taken down. It’s gone for now,” said Wan.

On Wednesday, some students set up a temporary, second Lennon Wall with post-it notes at a booth. Plans for a third, more permanent Lennon Wall to be established Wednesday were scrapped after assessing security concerns.

“What’s been happening is that we have been reading about other universities having issues where the peaceful and respectful intent of the (Lennon Walls) hasn’t been respected,” said Sylvia Ceacero, executive director of the Simon Fraser Students Society, which supported the third wall.

“We are concerned about the safety of our board and staff and of all students. We just want to ensure and minimize the potential for altercations and conflict that has been seen at other universities.”

Lennon Walls have sprung up in Hong Kong in the wake of citizen protests against its government, with people sticking hundreds of post-it notes in an array of colours on pedestrian underpasses and outdoor staircases. They are handwritten scribbles of support and inspirational wishes for demonstrators protesting a controversial extradition bill that would ease the transfer of fugitives to mainland China.

Other cities have now picked up on mounting Lennon Walls, a concept that originated in Prague, Czech Republic, in the 1980s as an homage to the late John Lennon, assassinated in 1980.

Videos posted on social media show how disagreements over the political situation in Hong Kong between pro-Beijing students and those who support Hong Kong protesters have ended in shoving and punching at the University of Queensland in Australia and at New Zealand’s University of Auckland.

Leo Shin, a professor of Asian Studies at UBC, said Canadian campuses should consider what they can do to head off any serious conflict here.

“I think it is a matter of concern. That we have seen clashes among students in Hong Kong, in Australia and in New Zealand. We should anticipate similar kinds of conflicts to spill over to Canadian campuses,” he said.

“What’s happening in Hong Kong is of a great deal of interest to students who are migrants and among students, in general. There is a large population on Canadian campuses and here at UBC and SFU of students with ties to the Chinese-speaking world. China, Hong Kong and, to some extent, Taiwan. And there are also many second-generation and ‘1.5’ generation students,” he continued.

“There are all kinds and not all are equally concerned, but many are. There are some in the student population supporting the Hong Kong movement and some on (Beijing’s) side, and of course there will be differing opinions. The conflict or clashes in Hong Kong will spill and touch us.

“The tricky thing is what can be done? (A solution will involve finding ways to promote dialogue) in a manner that befits a university where we can disagree in a peaceful manner.”

Simon Fraser University spokeswoman Angela Wilson said it is aware the board of the student society is “considering erecting a Lennon Wall for students’ use. The society has shared that it is currently reviewing protocols to ensure that all safety considerations are met. SFU Campus Public Safety continues to monitor this situation and support campus safety.”

JLee-Young@postmedia.com
https://theprovince.com/news/local-news/hong-kong-protests-tension-spills-over-onto-simon-fraser-university-campus/wcm/baed18be-fde7-43a7-9a9b-5627d3456199

See this earlier by CCP mouthpiece "Global Times':

Quote
Chinese consulate in Australia praises patriotic students for counter-protest against separatists
http://www.globaltimes.cn/content/1159212.shtml

1330 update--note this in New Zealand:

Quote
Chinese consulate praises students in scuffle at Auckland University
https://www.stuff.co.nz/auckland/114669992/chinese-consulate-praises-auckland-university-students-in-scuffle-for-spontaneous-acts-and-deeds

Mark
Ottawa

Mark
Ottawa
« Last Edit: August 01, 2019, 13:27:04 by MarkOttawa »
Ça explique, mais ça n'excuse pas.

Offline MarkOttawa

  • Army.ca Fixture
  • *****
  • 73,300
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 6,558
  • Two birthdays
    • The 3Ds Blog
Re: Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread
« Reply #3552 on: August 06, 2019, 14:04:28 »
Chicoms threaten India with a trade hammer:

Quote
Exclusive: China warns India of 'reverse sanctions' if Huawei is blocked - sources

China has told India not to block its Huawei Technologies [HWT.UL] from doing business in the country, warning there could be consequences for Indian firms operating in China, sources with knowledge of the matter said.

India is due to hold trials for installing a next-generation 5G cellular network in the next few months, but has not yet taken a call on whether it would invite the Chinese telecoms equipment maker to take part, telecoms minister Ravi Shankar Prasad has said.

Huawei, the world’s biggest maker of such gear, is at the centre of a geopolitical tug-of-war between China and the United States. U.S. President Donald Trump’s administration put the company on a blacklist in May, citing national security concerns. It has asked its allies not to use Huawei equipment, which it says China could exploit for spying.

Two sources privy to internal discussions in New Delhi said India’s ambassador in Beijing, Vikram Misri, was called to the Chinese foreign ministry on July 10 to hear China’s concerns about the U.S. campaign to keep Huawei out of 5G mobile infrastructure worldwide.

During the meeting, Chinese officials said there could be “reverse sanctions” on Indian firms engaged in business in China should India block Huawei because of pressure from Washington, one of the sources said, citing a readout of the ambassador’s meeting.

In response to Reuters’ questions, China’s foreign ministry said Beijing hoped India would make an independent decision on 5G bidders.

“Huawei has carried out operations in India for a long time, and has made contributions to the development of Indian society and the economy that is clear to all,” spokeswoman Hua Chunying said in a statement.

“On the issue of Chinese enterprises participating in the construction of India’s 5G, we hope the Indian side makes an independent and objective decision, and provides a fair, just and non-discriminatory commercial environment for Chinese enterprises’ investment and operations, to realize mutual benefit.”

The Indian foreign ministry did not respond to a request for comment...
https://www.reuters.com/article/us-huawei-india-exclusive/exclusive-china-warns-india-of-reverse-sanctions-if-huawei-is-blocked-sources-idUSKCN1UW1FF

Mark
Ottawa
Ça explique, mais ça n'excuse pas.

Offline MarkOttawa

  • Army.ca Fixture
  • *****
  • 73,300
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 6,558
  • Two birthdays
    • The 3Ds Blog
Re: Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread
« Reply #3553 on: August 12, 2019, 17:32:11 »
Meanwhile at Simon Fraser and other universities in Anglosphere:

Quote
Hong Kong protests to Uygur camps: how Chinese students became a subject of scorn

    Campus confrontations have erupted from Canada to New Zealand as mainland Chinese students react, sometimes violently, to public scrutiny of Beijing’s policies
    Such conflict is likely to persist as Chinese diplomatic missions support robust rebuttals to those who disagree with China’s stance [emphasis added--that's one way of describing undiplomatic interference in domestic affairs]

A creative but controversial meme has been racking up likes on a Facebook page titled SFU Dank Memes, a private group frequented by more than 3,700 students at Vancouver’s Simon Fraser University (SFU).

It features a Photoshopped image of a duplicitous masked operative from the popular video game Team Fortress 2 and an accompanying caption that reads: “Try to figure out who’s the Chinese communist spy at SFU when half the school is Chinese. And worst of all, he could be any one of us [emphasis added].”

The purported undercover agent in their midst is an unidentified vandal captured by security cameras last week wrecking the university’s so-called Lennon Wall, a noticeboard turned campaign space which has been covered with a mosaic of multicoloured messages in support of Hong Kong’s anti-government protests
.
The wall has become one of several flashpoints amid an increasingly bitter debate among overseas ethnic Chinese students, which has sparked sometimes testy confrontations emotionally charged by questions of identity, history and political belief. 



“To me, these memes aren’t even funny and merely show ignorance – similar to the racist jokes people made during earlier decades of Chinese immigration,” said 20-year-old student Matthew Wu, who hails from mainland China. “We are talking about serious discrimination towards mainlanders here.”

Wu, who declined to provide his real name, is among the 1.5 million Chinese students studying outside the country who have found themselves thrust into the spotlight at university campuses from Australia
to New Zealand to Canada.  Hong Kong’s extradition bill protests, sometimes unruly, have rocked the city since June and have renewed international scrutiny of Beijing’s policies...

At the University of Queensland in Brisbane, mainland Chinese students last month came to blows with a group supporting the Hong Kong protests when the latter held a demonstration on campus.

The group, comprising of Hong Kong and Australian students, also condemned China’s mass incarceration of ethnic Uygurs in its far western region of Xinjiang. Mainland Chinese make up about 9,000 of the university’s 50,000-strong student population.

Meanwhile, at the Australian National University in Canberra and University of New South Wales in Sydney, local Lennon Walls have also been vandalised or become the site of verbal clashes.

And in New Zealand, at the University of Auckland, where mainland Chinese students make up about 10 per cent of the student body, a man made headlines last month when he was captured on film pushing a female Hongkonger to the ground after an argument over a Lennon Wall...

Canada, Australia and New Zealand, with their natural beauty, clean air and large Chinese diaspora, have long been popular destinations for mainland Chinese youngsters seeking an education overseas. More than 140,000 study at Canadian higher-learning institutions, where they pay an average of C$27,159 (US$20,400) per year in tuition – over four times that of Canadians.

Australia plays host to more than 135,000 mainland Chinese students, and New Zealand almost 30,000.

In Vancouver, one of Canada’s most expensive cities, mainland Chinese students are often perceived as uber-wealthy Lamborghini-driving migrants who lead lavish lifestyles and buy up expensive properties. Yet with all their privilege, perceived or otherwise, they often face difficulties integrating into mainstream society.

...Ma said he and many other mainland Chinese saw displays of support for the Hong Kong protesters as campaigns aimed at separating the city from China, which they took personally.

“It challenges my understanding of my country and myself,” Ma said. He argued that Australian society should seek a greater understanding of the Chinese perspective.

“I do respect freedom of speech – that is a core value – but another core of Australia is multiculturalism. So in that sense, white Australians should also respect Chinese culture – and unity and unification are a very important part of it.”..

Beijing’s influence is on display through some 150 campus organisations that are chapters of the Chinese Students and Scholars Association (CSSA), some of which receive partial government funding for events.
Billed as a student-led group to help adjust to life abroad, American media reports claim to have seen CSSA members in WeChat conversations coordinating with consular officials to rally students for political ends.

Examples include attendance at a protest against a visit by the Dalai Lama to the University of California in San Diego in 2017, and the disruption of a talk by a Uygur activist at McMaster University in British Columbia earlier this year.

“They throw parties and provide rides for new mainland Chinese students, but they also serve as a powerful socialising and monitoring function, where new mainlanders learn that they do not enjoy all the freedoms other students at international universities have,” said Anders Corr, a geopolitical analyst who has written about the influence of these student associations on Western university campuses.

“Chinese students must still promote a positive image of China.”

Meanwhile, Chinese diplomatic missions have made no secret of their support for students promoting Beijing’s line abroad [emphasis added].

After last month’s clashes at the University of Queensland, the consulate in Brisbane issued a statement in Chinese condemning Hong Kong students for “talk of separatism” and “igniting anger and sparking protests”. It praised counter-demonstrators for their “acts of patriotism”.

In New Zealand, after scuffles at the University of Auckland, the city’s consulate lauded students backing Beijing for their “spontaneous acts and deeds out of their love of China and love of Hong Kong”...
https://www.scmp.com/week-asia/society/article/3022207/hong-kong-protests-uygur-camps-how-chinese-students-became

Mark
Ottawa
Ça explique, mais ça n'excuse pas.

Offline MarkOttawa

  • Army.ca Fixture
  • *****
  • 73,300
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 6,558
  • Two birthdays
    • The 3Ds Blog
Re: Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread
« Reply #3554 on: August 13, 2019, 16:52:39 »
By Prof. Charles Burton, one of those rare Canadians who has grokked the nature of the Chicoms for quite a while:

Quote
Xi Jinping may want to rule the world, but he has problems at home, too

Charles Burton is associate professor of political science at Brock University at St. Catharines, Ont., senior fellow at the Macdonald-Laurier Institute’s Centre for Advancing Canada’s Interests Abroad, and former counsellor at the Canadian embassy in Beijing [as an academic on special assignment, 1991-93, type of position since eliminated,pity https://www.macdonaldlaurier.ca/experts/charles-burton/].

While the Hong Kong showdown continues to deteriorate in clouds of tear gas, hundreds of arrests and increasingly dark rhetoric out of Beijing, the Chinese Communist Party senior leadership has relocated to the seaside town of Beidaihe, 200 kilometres east of Beijing, for their summer retreat.

A party tradition since the 1950s, this is not simply two weeks of sun, sand and sea-bathing with the bodyguards. It is also about political factional posturing in secretive preparation for this fall’s policy debates. There will be a lot of politicking by the beach, as party General-Secretary Xi Jinping strives to reinforce the critical support he needs from the party and military elders, and to stave off any challenges to his authority over the next year.

But things may not go as smoothly as in past retreats. Among the elders attending Beidaihe is former strongman Jiang Zemin. At 92, Mr. Jiang is the patriarch of a significant faction of senior officials who have been severely discomfited by Mr. Xi’s purges, anti-corruption investigations and administrative restructuring to centralize party authority in his own office.

Now that China’s economy and foreign relations are in major turbulence, Mr. Xi is left holding the bag. Much of the problem stems from his attempts to turn back Deng Xiaoping’s legacy of politically accountable collective leadership and undo Mr. Deng’s program of openness to the outside world and market-based economic reform.

It is the betrayal of Mr. Deng’s commitment to 50 years of “one country, two systems” that is the source of Hong Kong’s unrest. China’s propaganda blames the United States as the “black hand” behind the protests, specifically accusing junior diplomat Julie Eadeh, a “trained subversion expert at the U.S. consulate in Hong Kong,” of directing the whole thing. Besides being petty and ridiculous, it is appallingly disgraceful of China’s party-controlled press to openly name Ms. Eadeh’s spouse and two children – apparently an open invitation for the People’s Republic of China’s triad thug supporters to menace the family.

Mr. Xi’s mismanagement of the Hong Kong file strengthens the momentum of Taiwan’s pro-independence regime, seriously compounding the failure of Mr. Xi’s leadership in the eyes of Chinese nationalists who yearn for Taiwan’s reunification with the motherland.

He has aggressively asserted China’s goal to overtake the United States as the global military and political hegemon by 2050, using the Belt and Road Initiative to reorient the world’s economy toward Beijing. This determination is evidenced by shameless flaunting of accepted norms of trade and diplomacy. It is not just Canada that has been outraged by the arbitrary detainment of Michael Kovrig and Michael Spavor, and China’s retaliatory banning of Canadian agricultural products on spurious grounds. In recent years, the Philippines, Japan, Norway, France and South Korea have all had comparable trade and consular pressures put on them for similar political reasons.

But now China’s geostrategic boldness has started to backfire, with a kick back from the United States unifying Republicans and Democrats alike against “the China threat.” The U.S.-China trade war is leading manufacturers with operations in China to pull up stakes and move to locations such as Vietnam, to avoid U.S. tariffs. Moreover, China’s plans to dominate and potentially control global telecommunications infrastructure through its telecom giant Huawei have now been shattered by U.S. opposition.

China’s economy – already unsteady due to pervasive corruption, as well as by overextended banks with too many bad loans on their books – now faces a crisis of business confidence and economic decline. Mr. Xi is unable to respond to U.S. demands that trade relations be fair, honest and reciprocal, lest he alienate too many of the Communist Party elites who ultimately sustain his grip on power.

Perhaps Mr. Xi has done the world a favour by exposing the true nature of the Communist Party’s long-range intentions, but as American commentator Gordon Chang has observed, ultimately his is “a militant, one-person regime that feels surrounded and threatened.”

A “surrounded and threatened” China feeling under siege does not bode well for making a rational conciliatory response to Hong Kong’s unrest. It also does not bode well for the future of Canada-China relations or for global peace. China desperately needs to find a way out of its political conundrum before it’s too late – for all involved.
https://www.theglobeandmail.com/opinion/article-xi-jinping-may-want-to-rule-the-world-but-he-has-problems-at-home/

Mark
Ottawa
Ça explique, mais ça n'excuse pas.

Offline daftandbarmy

  • Army.ca Legend
  • *****
  • 244,600
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 13,719
  • The Older I Get, The Better I Was
Re: Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread
« Reply #3555 on: August 13, 2019, 21:18:17 »
One reason why Hong Kong might wind up being treated like a foreign invader by China...


CHINA’S SECURITY PROBLEM
(Rand)

The twin security goals of preserving domestic order and well-being
and deterring external threats to Chinese territory are closely interrelated,
from the Chinese perspective. On the one hand, the maintenance
of domestic order and well-being is viewed as the sine qua non
for the defense of Chinese territory against outside threats. Specifically,
a weak, divided and conflictual, or “unjust” (i.e., highly coercive
and corrupt) leadership and an impoverished, disgruntled populace
are viewed as the primary sources of domestic instability and conflict
and invariably lead to a weakening of China’s defenses, which in turn
invite foreign manipulation and aggression. On the other hand,
maintaining a strong defense, eliciting political (and, during the premodern
period, cultural) deference from the periphery, preserving
the broader goal of Chinese regional centrality, and influencing the
actions of more distant powers are seen as absolutely necessary not
only to ensure regional order and deter or prevent foreign aggression
and territorial dismemberment but also to avert internal social unrest.
This is because a state that is unable to control its borders and
command the respect of foreign powers is seen as weak and unable
to rule its citizenry.

https://www.rand.org/content/dam/rand/pubs/monograph_reports/MR1121/mr1121.ch2.pdf
"The most important qualification of a soldier is fortitude under fatigue and privation. Courage is only second; hardship, poverty and want are the best school for a soldier." Napoleon