Author Topic: Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread  (Read 987190 times)

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Online MarkOttawa

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Re: The Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread
« Reply #3300 on: December 18, 2016, 13:38:51 »
How will PEOTUS Trump deal with the South China Sea?

Quote
Muted U.S. Response to China’s Seizure of Drone Worries Asian Allies

Only a day before a small Chinese boat sidled up to a United States Navy research vessel in waters off the Philippines and audaciously seized an underwater drone from American sailors, the commander of United States military operations in the region told an audience in Australia that America had a winning military formula.

“Capability times resolve times signaling equals deterrence,” Adm. Harry B. Harris Jr. told a blue-chip crowd of diplomats and analysts at the prestigious Lowy Institute in Sydney, Australia, the leading city in America’s closest ally in the region.

In the eyes of America’s friends in Asia, the brazen maneuver to launch an operation against an American Navy vessel in international waters in the South China Sea about 50 miles from the Philippines, another close American ally, has raised questions about one of the admiral’s crucial words. It was also seen by some as a taunt to President-elect Donald J. Trump, who has challenged the One China policy on Taiwan and has vowed to deal forcefully with Beijing in trade and other issues.

“The weak link is the resolve, and the Chinese are testing that, as well as baiting Trump,” said Euan Graham, the director of international security at the Lowy Institute. “Capability, yes. Signaling, yes, with sending F-22 fighter jets to Australia. But the very muted response means the equation falls down on resolve.”

Across Asia, diplomats and analysts said they were perplexed at the inability of the Obama administration to devise a strong response to China’s challenge. It did not even dispatch an American destroyer to the spot near Subic Bay, a former American Navy base that is still frequented by American ships, some noted.

After discussions at the National Security Council on how to deal with the issue, the Obama administration sent a démarche to China demanding the return of the drone [emphasis added]. On Saturday [Dec. 17], China said it would comply with the request but did not indicate when or how the equipment would be sent back.

The end result, analysts said, is that China will be emboldened by having carried out an act that amounted to hybrid warfare, falling just short of provoking conflict, and suffering few noticeable consequences...


...
http://www.nytimes.com/2016/12/18/world/asia/muted-us-response-to-chinas-seizure-of-drone-worries-asian-allies.html

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Offline tomahawk6

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Re: The Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread
« Reply #3301 on: December 18, 2016, 19:29:16 »
Trump told China to keep the drone.Probably not one of his smartest utterances.Perhaps he wanted to show that the drone was of little value.After the drone might have secrets that shouldnt be revealed.Now the drone can be used to improve Chinese drones and figure out how to jam US drones.

This drone is known as a Littoral Battlespace Sensing glider. We might want it back without starting a shooting war.

http://www.navaldrones.com/LBS-Glider.html

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Re: The Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread
« Reply #3302 on: December 26, 2016, 12:10:20 »
Sales?

Quote
China tests latest J-31 stealth jet fighter



China has tested the latest version of its fifth-­generation stealth fighter, state media reported yesterday, as it tries to end the West’s monopoly on the world’s most advanced warplanes.

The test comes as the nation flexes its military muscles, sending its sole aircraft carrier the ­Liaoning into the western Pacific in recent days to lead drills there for the first time.

The newest version of the J-31 — now renamed the FC-31 Gyrfalcon — took to the air for the first time on Friday [Dec. 23], the China Daily reported.

The twin-engine jet is China’s answer to the US F-35, the world’s most technically advanced fighter. In the past China has been accused of copying designs from Russian fighters, and some analysts say the FC-31 bears a close resemblance to the F-35.

When completed, the FC-31 will become the country’s second fifth-generation fighter after the J-20, which put on its first public performance in November.
http://www.theaustralian.com.au/news/world/china-tests-latest-j31-stealth-jet-fighter/news-story/f45622f5844f602709dedafc247ad4f9

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Offline Ostrozac

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Re: The Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread
« Reply #3303 on: December 26, 2016, 15:54:17 »
Sales?


Pakistan for sure. Possibly small numbers for Iran and Nigeria, too.

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Re: The Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread
« Reply #3304 on: December 28, 2016, 12:40:45 »
More on the Evolution of Chinese leadership:

http://www.the-american-interest.com/2016/12/28/xi-eyes-putin-model-for-extending-his-rule/

Quote
Xi Eyes “Putin Model” for Extending His Rule

When Chinese President Xi Jinping earned the designation of China’s “core” leader in October, speculation ran rampant about whether Xi was laying the groundwork for an extended period of strongman rule, even after his second term expires in 2022. New reporting from The Wall Street Journal suggests that prospect is increasingly likely:

Now, as he nears the end of his first five-year term, many party insiders say Mr. Xi is trying to block promotion of a potential successor next year, suggesting he wants to remain in office after his second term expires in 2022, when he would be 69 years old.

Mr. Xi, who is president, party chief and military commander, “wants to keep going” after 2022 and to explore a leadership structure “just like the Putin model,” says one party official who meets regularly with top leaders. Several others with access to party leaders and their relatives say similar things. […]

Mr. Xi’s efforts to secure greater authority may help ensure political stability in the short run, as an era-defining economic boon starts to falter. But they risk upending conventions developed since Mao’s death to allow flexibility in government and ensure a regular and orderly transition of power.

The true test of Xi’s ambition will come at the Party Congress next year, when he will have a chance to refresh the ranks of the party leadership. Early signs suggest that he will stack the Politburo and the Central Committee with loyalists to make the party more disciplined and personally loyal; he could also downgrade the role of the seven-member Politburo Standing Committee to facilitate a stronger presidential system. In any case, it seems that China is continuing to move away from its post-Mao rule by committee, a system formed in response to the horrible and murderous abuses that occurred periodically under Mao’s untrammeled rule, and back toward one-person rule.

Xi’s apparent interest in a Putin-style leadership model also points to a wider phenomenon. All over the world, including in the U.S., the trend is away from the anonymous rule of technocrats and experts and toward rule by strong personalities. Putin in Russia, Erdogan in Turkey, Modi in India, and Abe in Japan are all manifestations of the trend, each embracing an unapologetic nationalism while projecting an image as a tough and decisive leader. Xi is already a member of that club, but his ongoing power consolidation could further cement his status among the ranks of the strong-willed leaders who are increasingly driving the global agenda these days.
Dagny, this is not a battle over material goods. It's a moral crisis, the greatest the world has ever faced and the last. Our age is the climax of centuries of evil. We must put an end to it, once and for all, or perish - we, the men of the mind. It was our own guilt. We produced the wealth of the world - but we let our enemies write its moral code.

Offline E.R. Campbell

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Re: The Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread
« Reply #3305 on: December 28, 2016, 15:52:26 »
More on the Evolution of Chinese leadership:

http://www.the-american-interest.com/2016/12/28/xi-eyes-putin-model-for-extending-his-rule/


I have been saying for quite some time that I have a hunch that Paramount Leader Xi sees China's problems as being of a nature that requires sustained, mature and generally popular leadership. I suspect he sees himself as the heir to Deng Xiaoping: someone who is needed to effect fundamental change in China.

My problem is that I have no idea about the direction he wants to go:dunno:

My own, personal view is that China needs to stabilize its economy, in part by getting the government out of more and more sectors but using government generated demand to help smooth out the inevitable peaks and valleys ~ Maynard Keynes, anyone? I also think that China needs to bring Taiwan back into the federation ... willingly, and I do not believe that is possible unless the remaining hard-liners in the Zhongnanhai, the HQ of the Party in Beijing, are purged and the entire Chinese approach to Hong Kong is reversed. (I know I have mentioned that a friend, a scholar, told me that China could have "one country - two systems" for a generation or two, but not, ever, "one country - n systems" (one for each "special" province). Her view is that two systems are viable for a while (say 50 to 75 years) while both China and the "special" provinces learn from one another. She did not believe that the messy, almost chaotic Western style democracy of Taiwan is suitable for China in the next century or so but she thought that parts of it ~ formal parties, for example, committed to "charters" ~ could be introduced first at province level and then to the whole country ... provided each "party" is Chinese nationalist and committed to a strong, central (oligarchical) almost imperial style of government.)

     
It is ill that men should kill one another in seditions, tumults and wars; but it is worse to bring nations to such misery, weakness and baseness
as to have neither strength nor courage to contend for anything; to have nothing left worth defending and to give the name of peace to desolation.
Algernon Sidney in Discourses Concerning Government, (1698)
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Offline OTR1

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Re: The Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread
« Reply #3306 on: December 28, 2016, 18:29:59 »
From Canberra Times letters page....

Online MarkOttawa

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Re: The Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread
« Reply #3307 on: December 30, 2016, 11:53:05 »
As for PLAN carrier development:

Quote
China's carrier replenishment ship begins sea trials



The People's Liberation Army Navy's (PLAN's) new Type 901 replenishment ship commenced sea trials on 18 December, according to Chinese media.

The 45,000-tonne vessel, which was built at Guangzhou Shipyard International's Longxue shipyard on the Pearl River, is expected to provide logistics support to the PLAN's nascent carrier force.

Photographic evidence of the ship's construction emerged in late 2015, not long before it was launched on 15 December 2015. It is equipped with three gantries and a fourth high-point structure port side aft, configured with five hose rigs for liquid refuelling on the port side and four on the starboard side. The central gantry provides a transfer station for solids on each side.

The ability to have multiple hoses connected will enable the Type 901 to not only provide aviation fuel and fuel oil to the carrier simultaneously, but also minimise the duration of each replenishment serial: a potentially hazardous evolution which limits the carrier's manoeuvrability and precludes it from operating aircraft.

The Type 901 will be able to refuel a carrier from its port side and, when fully worked-up, the ship will also be able to simultaneously refuel one of the carrier's destroyer/frigate escorts on its starboard side.

Replenishment of solids can be expected to include food and equipment spares, as well as air-launched munitions.

Propulsion of the Type 901 is thought to be provided by four QC280 gas turbines, each delivering 28 MW, enabling the ship to achieve a maximum speed of about 25 kt. This is significantly faster than the Fuchi-class (Type 903A). The speed is needed for the Type 901 to keep pace with the carrier and its escorts.

Refuelling conventionally powered carriers may be required every 3-4 days if conducting intensive flying operations requiring the carrier to operate near its maximum speed for extended periods.
http://www.janes.com/article/66613/china-s-carrier-replenishment-ship-begins-sea-trials

Meanwhile:

Quote
Chinese Carrier Moves Ahead Following Year of Increased Activity in South China Sea

Chinese warships, led by the country’s first aircraft carrier, the Soviet-built Liaoning, sailed past Taiwan and into the South China Sea earlier this week. It was a move that caught the attention of both Taiwan and Japan, who closely observed the six-vessel group.

“China is developing a regional military capability,” said Brad Glosserman, security analyst at Pacific Forum. "The Chinese believe that they need to have the capacity and the ability to protect their interests as they become increasingly far flung. They see that a power that aspires to the status it has, will have the a fully fledged military... they're going to go from a green water, in other words a close-water navy, to blue water, which is one capable of sailing in the oceans.”

Glosserman says part of that progression is possessing an aircraft carrier, and he says the world may be “very quick to tie it to other developments, and I think that we should look at this as something that China is going to do regardless.”..
http://www.voanews.com/a/china-carrier-south-china-sea/3656913.html

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Online MarkOttawa

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Re: The Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread
« Reply #3308 on: January 15, 2017, 14:46:32 »
Further to this post,

Quote
Xi’s China: Grumbling (and Rumbling?) in the PLA
https://cgai3ds.wordpress.com/2016/10/17/mark-collins-xis-china-grumbling-and-rumbling-in-the-pla/

the president keeps cleaning the PLA house:

Quote
China’s veteran generals fading out in massive PLA reshuffle
Changes to come ahead of 19th National Congress as President Xi Jinping consolidates his power

China’s military is stepping up the pace of a massive reshuffle among its leadership ahead of a Communist Party congress later this year as President Xi Jinping consolidates his power within the armed forces, according to sources familiar with the matter.

Nearly 50 senior officers are due to leave their positions as part of the shake-up, including 18 full-ranking generals, two independent sources told the South China Morning Post.

The coming changes are aimed at promoting a new generation of officers, with veterans giving way to younger talent to take over the leadership, one source said...
http://www.scmp.com/news/china/diplomacy-defence/article/2062223/chinas-veteran-generals-fading-out-massive-pla

Mark
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Offline tomahawk6

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Re: The Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread
« Reply #3309 on: January 25, 2017, 08:53:41 »
The role of the J-20 may be to interdict refueling aircraft and AWACS.This strategy would in effect force opposing air forces to operate out of range of these aircraft. My solution would be to let carriers target these planes directly,without endangering the supporting aircraft.

http://www.businessinsider.com/the-real-purpose-behind-chinas-mysterious-j-20-combat-jet-2017-1?r=UK&IR=T

In November, China debuted the Chengdu J-20, a large, stealthy jet that some have compared to the F-22 Raptor. But according to experts, the J-20 is not a fighter, not a dogfighter, not stealthy, and not at all like the F-22 or F-35.

Malcolm Davis, a senior analyst at the Australia Strategic Policy Institute, told Business Insider that the J-20 is a "fundamentally different sort of aircraft than the F-35."

Davis characterized the J-20 as "high-speed, long-range, not quite as stealthy (as US fifth-gen aircraft), but [the Chinese] clearly don't see that as important." According to Davis, the J-20 is "not a fighter, but an interceptor and a strike aircraft" that doesn't seek to contend with US jets in air-to-air battles.

Instead, "the Chinese are recognizing they can attack critical airborne support systems like AWACS (airborne early warning and control systems) and refueling planes so they can't do their job," Davis said. "If you can force the tankers back, then the F-35s and other platforms aren't sufficient because they can't reach their target."

Offline Thucydides

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Re: The Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread
« Reply #3310 on: February 15, 2017, 12:14:58 »
National Interest on the uncertain future of Asia. The economic fundamentals have never really been properly reported, and there is no doubt that some nasty surprises will surface, ones which we are not fundamentally prepared for. This is a long article, so only page one is posted, remainder on link:

http://nationalinterest.org/feature/think-asia-will-dominate-the-21st-century-think-again-19429

Quote
Think Asia Will Dominate the 21st Century? Think Again.
Michael R. Auslin deconstructs the tensions lurking below the region’s prosperous surface.
Dov S. Zakheim
February 13, 2017
Michael R. Auslin, The End of the Asian Century: War, Stagnation, and the Risks to the World’s Most Dynamic Region (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2017), 304 pp., $30.00.

MICHAEL R. Auslin opens his book with a preface entitled “The Asia that Nobody Sees.” He might better have entitled it “Hiding in Plain Sight.” For far too long, but especially during the Obama years, policymakers chose to focus on Asia’s remarkable economic growth, coupled with an era of relative peace. Too often they overlooked economic, demographic, social, political and military tensions that did not lurk all that far below Asia’s shiny surface.

Barack Obama, who spent part of his formative years in Indonesia, was a leading cheerleader for the concept of the Asian century. He seemed to care little about Europe and preferred to avoid the troubles of the Middle East as much as possible. He embraced the notion of a rising Asia that soon would constitute America’s most vital interests. It was in that spirit, too, that Hillary Clinton announced the “pivot to Asia,” which was meant to refocus American military power and political and economic priorities away from Europe and the Middle East and instead underscore Asia’s importance to the United States.

Of course, much of the Middle East is in Asia; so too are five former Soviet republics; so too is Afghanistan. But when Obama and Hillary Clinton referred to Asia, they generally meant East Asia, though at times they expanded their definition to include South Asia, employing the term “Indo-Pacific.” But their focus was primarily on East and Southeast Asia, and particularly on China, Japan, Korea and five of the eight ASEAN states—Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, Vietnam and Thailand. It is these countries, plus India, that constitute Asia’s economic powerhouses (Brunei is an oil-rich country having more in common economically with the states of the Arabian Gulf than with its ASEAN partners). Laos, Cambodia and Myanmar lag far behind in political and economic development. Auslin likewise pays them far less attention than he does to their more advanced ASEAN partners, though the Obama administration, consistent with its policy of outreach to enemies and other subjects of long-time American sanctions, moved quickly to improve relations with Myanmar when the “Burmese Spring” blossomed in 2010.

Auslin asks what he terms “inconvenient questions,” such as: “How resilient are Asian countries to economic shocks? How adaptable are leading economic sectors and government policies?” Of course, the answers depend on the country in question. But Auslin rightly recognizes that these issues are not unique to any one state in the region and are common to virtually all of them. As he points out,

Asian countries, developed and developing alike, face significant challenges. . . . Demand from Western countries will possibly level off as those societies age and as incomes remain stagnant. . . . Corruption, malinvestment, and waste eat away at economic efficiency.

AS AUSLIN demonstrates, China is the prime exemplar of these developments. Chinese economic statistics, never fully reliable, continue to be adjusted downward. Wages have risen sharply over the past decade; indeed, for several years, the minimum wage was growing at double digits—as high as 18 percent. The Chinese banking system remains opaque, and bank balance sheets are unreliable, as they continue to overstate the value of their assets, notably state-owned enterprises (SOEs). Moreover, obtaining financing in China often requires connections in Beijing, further undermining the efficiency of the banking system. Finally, local and provincial regulations often impede business growth, while corruption, particularly at those levels, remains rampant, despite President Xi Jinping’s ongoing efforts to clean house. Lastly, Auslin rightly identifies yet another scourge that China—and other Asian economies—suffer from: Mafia-like intimidation, or worse, of foreign investors. Not surprisingly, companies that are contemplating investment in East Asia are looking more and more at Vietnam, Malaysia or Indonesia, or even the Philippines, rather than risk shrinking margins in China.

The SOEs are an albatross around China’s economic neck, yet even the increasingly powerful Xi, recently crowned China’s “core leader,” has been unable to shut most of them down. The management, ownership and finances of many private businesses also are opaque. Often, businesses that are nominally private are actually owned by the government through a complex chain of holding companies. This is particularly the case with respect to firms in the high-tech and aerospace sectors.

The era of untrammeled Chinese economic growth appears to be over—and that development naturally does not account for whatever actions a new Trump administration will take to even the playing field of Chinese-American trade. Should the administration initiate steps that would lead to a trade war with Beijing, it would seriously affect the American economy, but devastate China’s. U.S. economic fundamentals are strong, and may even be getting stronger, while China, as Auslin notes, has not yet achieved sustainable development. China’s economic vicissitudes are far from over.
Dagny, this is not a battle over material goods. It's a moral crisis, the greatest the world has ever faced and the last. Our age is the climax of centuries of evil. We must put an end to it, once and for all, or perish - we, the men of the mind. It was our own guilt. We produced the wealth of the world - but we let our enemies write its moral code.

Offline chanman

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Re: The Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread
« Reply #3311 on: February 19, 2017, 16:05:22 »
The role of the J-20 may be to interdict refueling aircraft and AWACS.This strategy would in effect force opposing air forces to operate out of range of these aircraft. My solution would be to let carriers target these planes directly,without endangering the supporting aircraft.

http://www.businessinsider.com/the-real-purpose-behind-chinas-mysterious-j-20-combat-jet-2017-1?r=UK&IR=T

In November, China debuted the Chengdu J-20, a large, stealthy jet that some have compared to the F-22 Raptor. But according to experts, the J-20 is not a fighter, not a dogfighter, not stealthy, and not at all like the F-22 or F-35.

Malcolm Davis, a senior analyst at the Australia Strategic Policy Institute, told Business Insider that the J-20 is a "fundamentally different sort of aircraft than the F-35."

Davis characterized the J-20 as "high-speed, long-range, not quite as stealthy (as US fifth-gen aircraft), but [the Chinese] clearly don't see that as important." According to Davis, the J-20 is "not a fighter, but an interceptor and a strike aircraft" that doesn't seek to contend with US jets in air-to-air battles.

Instead, "the Chinese are recognizing they can attack critical airborne support systems like AWACS (airborne early warning and control systems) and refueling planes so they can't do their job," Davis said. "If you can force the tankers back, then the F-35s and other platforms aren't sufficient because they can't reach their target."

Carriers still use dedicated AWACS although inflight refueling is done with buddy refuelling now. More to the point, bringing the carriers in closer just shifts the risk from USAF aircraft and bases to Navy aircraft and vessels.

Offline Thucydides

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Re: The Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread
« Reply #3312 on: March 04, 2017, 23:22:35 »
President Trump shakes up China as well. They should have read "The Art of the Deal"

http://www.businessinsider.com/how-trump-is-overshadowing-chinas-biggest-political-gathering-2017-3

Quote
How Trump is overshadowing China's biggest political gathering — even though he's half a world away
South China Morning Post
Laura Zhou, South China Morning Post

US President Donald Trump may not be attending the annual gatherings of China’s political elite but uncertainty over his policies is casting a long shadow over the events in Beijing.

About 5,0000 government officials, party bigwigs and company executives are gathering in the Chinese capital to discuss government policy for the year ahead.

Though the meetings are strictly stage managed and most of the discussions and decisions take place behind closed doors, the annual meetings, better known as the “two sessions” in China, give a glimpse into Beijing’s political priorities and economic expectations.

They will be in special focus this year as Beijing adjusts to rising uncertainty from the Trump administration and its policies.

On the sidelines of the first day of the Chinese People’s Political Consultative Conference on Friday, delegates said China was putting some decisions on hold because of the question marks over Trump’s direction.

One area of concern is currency reform.

Yu Yongding, a former member of the central bank’s monetary policy committee and a senior researcher of the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, said various US issues, including Sino-US ties and Trump were having a big impact on plans to overhaul the China’s foreign exchange rate system. “We must not give Trump an excuse to accuse China of currency manipulation,” Yu said.

“If the Trump administration did decide to do so, we would fight back forcefully. If not, it would shift the bilateral friction to trade, tariffs and investment and make things more complicated. There are still many uncertainties. I believe the central bank will take a wait-and-see approach until the situation becomes clear.”

Wang Hongguang, former deputy commander of Nanjing military area command, also expressed concerns about Trump’s potential impact on relations with China, and is watching closely whether the reasonably smooth talks between the US president and State Councillor Yang Jiechi would signal any turnaround.

This year’s two sessions come at a time of heightened tension between China and United States; ties between the two countries have been bumpy since Trump’s victory in the presidential election in November.

In an unprecedented move, Trump, while president-elect, broke decades-long protocol in December by accepting a phone call from Taiwanese President Tsai Ing-wen.

Trump ... broke decades-long protocol in December by accepting a phone call from Taiwanese President Tsai Ing-wen.
The call was the first such contact with Taipei by a US president-elect or president since Jimmy Carter severed formal diplomatic ties with Taipei and adopted a one-China policy in 1979.

Trump then publicly questioned US support for the one-China policy, alongside constant criticism of China’s currency tactics, threats to slap punitive tariffs on Chinese goods, and bluster over China’s military build-up in the South China Sea – all of which are believed to have reinforced the concerns of the nation’s top leaders who prize stability and predictability as top priorities.

Though most policies of the new US administration have yet to be announced, Trump, who has advocated protectionism, claimed that by slapping tariffs on Chinese goods, he would create more manufacturing jobs in the United States. This unnerved policymakers and businesspeople in China, which has a larger trade surplus with the US than with any other nation.

Heightened trade tension with Washington would be the last thing Beijing wanted as the ruling Communist Party prepares for a leadership transition later this year amid increasingly downward economic pressure.

On Tuesday, Commerce Minister Gao Hucheng urged Washington to negotiate any disputes with Beijing and warned that trade war “should not be an option”.

Deng Yuwen, a public commentator in Beijing and a researcher at the Charhar Institute think tank, said such concerns would be reflected in this year’s government work report, which is considered an indirect yet authoritative guide for the coming year’s policy priorities.

“For example, when it comes to setting a fiscal budget or making economic development plans, a greater emphasis could be placed on how to increase domestic demand [so as to deal with the uncertainty under Trump],” he said.

Deng said the possibility of protectionist policies under Trump would also be on the agenda during panel discussions among executives of private- and state-owned companies attending the meetings.

“I think those working in trade businesses and executives looking to invest in the US will bring up the topics.”

Wei Jianguo, vice-director of the China Centre for International Economic Exchanges and a former vice-minister of commerce, said the two sessions this year would be a “timely and proper opportunity” for Beijing to dispel fears among those who worry about Trump’s possible protectionist policies, which Wei believed would be unlikely to happen.

“Trump’s goal is to put America first, and as the world’s second-largest economy with the largest domestic market, China is the only one that can help Trump achieve this goal,” Wei said.

“I am optimistic about the trade future between China and the US, though disputes and conflicts could hardly be avoided, so Beijing can take this chance to appease those who have such concerns.”

China is also facing increasing challenges in its neighbouring regions, including the South China Sea, Taiwan and the Korean peninsula, many of which are related to China’s rivalry with the US.

“Although the two sessions will be mostly focused on domestic issues rather than foreign policies, this year is special because China is now embroiled in a restive environment and Trump is seen a major factor in this instability,” Deng said.

Additional reporting by Frank Tang and Choi Chi-yuk.

Read the original article on South China Morning Post. Copyright 2017. Follow South China Morning Post on Twitter.
Dagny, this is not a battle over material goods. It's a moral crisis, the greatest the world has ever faced and the last. Our age is the climax of centuries of evil. We must put an end to it, once and for all, or perish - we, the men of the mind. It was our own guilt. We produced the wealth of the world - but we let our enemies write its moral code.

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Re: The Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread
« Reply #3313 on: March 05, 2017, 14:42:11 »
Amazing video.  Also some interesting tidbits on how Canada should respond.

Why China Can Not Rise Peacefully

Offline Thucydides

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Re: The Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread
« Reply #3314 on: March 10, 2017, 12:56:36 »
China imposes tighter controls on capital outflows. This could have some serious ripple effects if it suddenly pulls the rug out from under many hot property markets:

https://betterdwelling.com/chinas-capital-outflows-just-reversed-bad-news-for-global-real-estate/

Quote
China’s Capital Outflows Just Reversed, Bad News For Global Real Estate
March 9, 2017

The world’s greatest overseas real estate binge might finally be over. According to the People’s Bank of China (PBoC), China saw its foreign exchange reserves rise to over US$3 trillion. The unexpected rise is the first in 8 months, and may indicate that the new regulatory crackdown on capital outflows is actually working. This is bad for real estate markets that have seen a sudden surge of buying activity from Mainland Chinese buyers.

China’s Capital Outflows

China’s capital outflows turned into inflows, meaning more foreign currency went into the country than left. The PBoC found itself with US$6.9 billion more than the month before, a 0.25% increase. This comes after US$220 billion in outflows in 2016, and another $12 billion in January. While it doesn’t seem like a lot in contrast, analysts polled by Reuters expected a drop of more than US$25 billion. Analysts are now adjusting projections since this means China’s foreign reserves are a full US$31.9 billion higher than they anticipated. This could mean that China’s new capital controls are much more effective than analysts had previously anticipated.

China’s Capital Controls

We’ve talked about China’s capital controls quite a few times, but in case you missed it here’s a brief intro. Chinese citizens are limited to exporting US$50,000 per person, per year. Not even enough to make a down payment on a house in Vancouver. So friends, family, strangers for money would lend their quotas to other people, so they could do a form of “soft” money laundering called smurfing.

Smurfing is a process where a large amount of money is broken down into smaller numbers to evade regulatory flags. The money is then wired by a number of people, then assembled by an overseas bank as a single account. Before you get the misconception that Chinese homebuyers are criminals, this is a fully legal process in countries like Canada, and the US where banks are even happy to help. This process plays a very important part in buying a home, and even paying the mortgage.

This all changed this year, when the PBoC and the State Administration of Foreign Exchange (SAFE) created additional rules to stop the outflow. The US$50,000 limit is still the same, but now banks are required to report transfers over ¥200,000 (US$29,000), and you’re no longer allowed to “lend” your allowance. Oh yeah, and the new rules strictly prohibit export of capital for buying bonds, “insurance-type” products, and real estate.

Companies now require government approval to purchase property abroad, and they can’t easily obtain it unless buying property has always been their primary business. Break the rules, you get a three year ban on exporting capital, and are investigated for money laundering. Being subject to a money laundering investigation in China is not fun from what I’ve been told.

Impact on Global Real Estate

Mainland Chinese investors are now the world’s largest buyers of overseas real estate. It’s actually sprung up multi-billion dollar businesses like Caimeiju, and Juwai that sell billions in overseas property, often sight unseen. These buyers added fuel to the fire created by over enthusiastic domestic buyers with massive mortgages, sending property rates soaring in Canada, Australia, England, France, Hong Kong…actually, pretty much everywhere.

Now that the capital controls expressly prohibit real estate purchases, it’s kind of tricky for Chinese buyers to continue to drive the market. Actually, it’s likely pretty hard to even get the money to pay the mortgage on current purchases. Vancouver, Canada – a hotspot for Chinese buyers, saw a sales decline of 78% during this Chinese New Year, one of the most popular times to buy. Bloomberg also reported that Chinese real estate buyers were suddenly short on cash after the change in rules. February’s inflow of foreign exchange might be the first official data point to show that China’s buyers can’t continue to drive international real estate markets.

Mainland Chinese buyers aren’t the only driver of soaring real estate prices in global capitals. However, many markets saw locals taking out record amounts of debt to compete with well funded foreign investors. It’ll be interesting to see if the narrative continues to be told that Chinese buyers are driving markets, or if locals will realize they’re now providing liquidity for those same well-funded investors that need to get out.
Dagny, this is not a battle over material goods. It's a moral crisis, the greatest the world has ever faced and the last. Our age is the climax of centuries of evil. We must put an end to it, once and for all, or perish - we, the men of the mind. It was our own guilt. We produced the wealth of the world - but we let our enemies write its moral code.

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Re: The Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread
« Reply #3315 on: April 19, 2017, 21:46:29 »
The PLA has taken a big step toward jointness,it will be interesting to see how concept works.

https://www.yahoo.com/news/chinas-xi-restructures-military-consolidates-control-051624357.html

BEIJING (Reuters) - Chinese President Xi Jinping has announced a military restructure of the People's Liberation Army (PLA) to transform it into a leaner fighting force with improved joint operations capability, state media said.

Centered around a new, condensed structure of 84 military units, the reshuffle builds on Xi's years-long efforts to modernize the PLA with greater emphasis on new capabilities including cyberspace, electronic and information warfare.

As chair of the Central Military Commission, Xi is also commander-in-chief of China's armed forces.

"This has profound and significant meaning in building a world-class military," Xi told commanders of the new units at the PLA headquarters in Beijing, according to the official Xinhua news agency report late on Tuesday.

All 84 new units are at the combined-corps level, which means commanders will hold the rank of major-general or rear-admiral, the official China Daily reported Wednesday, adding that unit members would likely be regrouped from existing forces given the Chinese military was still engaged in cutting its troops by 300,000, one of the wide-ranging military reforms introduced by Xi in late 2015.

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Re: Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread
« Reply #3316 on: June 17, 2017, 17:29:59 »
Decades long strategic planning. Our planning horizons seem to be measured in months, by contrast:

https://strategypage.com/on_point/20170124205449.aspx

Quote
Confronting China's Slow Invasion of the South China Sea Is Long Overdue

by Austin Bay
January 24, 2017
Since the 1990s, China has insistently waged a slow and deliberate imperial war of territorial expansion in the South China Sea.

"Imperial war" is the apt description. China exhibits classic imperial ambition. Using economic, diplomatic and military muscle (camouflaged by propaganda), Beijing adds territory to its imperial dominion at the expense of less powerful neighbors.

In 1950, the newly installed Communist regime in Beijing took Tibet. The Communists defended their action by claiming that "traditionally" Tibet was a Chinese province. As progressive Communists they were liberating Tibet from non-progressives. If that sounds like old time Communist propaganda gospel, it was.

Invading Tibet took two weeks. By mid-1951, Beijing had full control of the country.

Weeks and months were the time metric for China's Tibet operation. Soldiers armed with rifles and artillery pieces were the means.

Reporters and headline writers understand the pace and weaponry of that kind of war -- rapidly seizing objectives while firing guns.

Tibet is a destination for Buddhist pilgrims and mountain climbers, not an international trade route. So who cared? India cared. Tibet is an invasion route into India. India felt threatened. In 1962, the Sino-Indian War flared over control of southern Himalayan passes. China won. So China's invasion of Tibet stood and still stands.

Beijing's South China Sea invasion moves at a different pace: decades. That makes recognizing the invasion difficult and confronting it even more problematic.

News media focus on hours, days and weeks, perhaps a year or two. Politicians, particularly in democracies, focus on electoral time. U.S. presidents have a four to eight year policy window -- not even a decade.

Over the last 30 years, China's principal weapon systems in the South China Sea haven't been bayonets, aircraft and warships, though Beijing is making increasing use of those classic means of coercion and menace.

China's principal weapons have been offshore construction barges, construction crews and exploratory oil drilling rigs, all supported by shepherding coast guard vessels and swarms of fishing boats.

The barge-borne construction crews usually begin with a "sea feature" like a reef or a rock in the South China Sea. A sea feature is not habitable. A sea feature is not, in and of itself, sovereign territory.

No matter. Only power matters to Beijing. The construction crews add thousands of cubic meters of dredged sand and reinforced concrete to the sea feature. Voila, an artificial islet. The crews top their manufactured islet with military-grade runways capable of handling high-performance combat aircraft. If the final product looks something like a stationary naval aircraft carrier surrounded by a strip of sand, that isn't a glitch, it's a feature.

The counterfeit archipelago Beijing has created now extends south from the Chinese coast and Hainan Island to close to Borneo and the Filipino island of Palawan.

Beijing has added a political coup de grace: the counterfeit archipelago is now sovereign Chinese territory, like Shanghai. Beijing's claim is utter fraud. It has no legitimate historical claim to the area.

China's man-made islands encroach on the sovereign territory and Exclusive Economic Zones of the Philippines, Malaysia and Vietnam. The islets and Beijing's claim to sovereignty also challenge Indonesian territorial sovereignty. Singapore is wary, and Singapore sits on the Strait of Malacca, the primary shipping route between the Indian and Pacific Oceans.

Every year, ships hauling goods worth some five trillion dollars traverse the South China Sea. China's counterfeit islands disrupt this traffic.

This isn't the distant Shangri-La of Tibet. This is a non-theoretical threat to global trade.

China's aggression has provoked intense resistance, particularly from Vietnam and the Philippines. But 2017 finds the Philippines buckling, despite its court victory. During the Obama Administration, the U.S. Navy did conduct Freedom of Navigation Operations to assert maritime right of passage. However, I think Beijing read the Obama Administration as feckless and unwilling to lead. Its island-creation program intensified.

The Trump Administration has said China's South China Sea invasion won't stand. In many quarters this is read as provocative. I say this response from Washington is long overdue.
Dagny, this is not a battle over material goods. It's a moral crisis, the greatest the world has ever faced and the last. Our age is the climax of centuries of evil. We must put an end to it, once and for all, or perish - we, the men of the mind. It was our own guilt. We produced the wealth of the world - but we let our enemies write its moral code.

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Re: Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread
« Reply #3317 on: June 25, 2017, 20:19:09 »
Decades long strategic planning. Our planning horizons seem to be measured in months, by contrast ...
Yeah, not knowing who the government'll be a decade from now does make it harder to plan.

Meanwhile ...
Quote
China has signed an agreement saying it will stop conducting state-sponsored cyberattacks aimed at stealing Canadian private-sector trade secrets and proprietary technology.

This industrial espionage accord was worked out this past Friday during high-level talks in Ottawa between senior Communist Party official Wang Yongqing and Daniel Jean, the national security and intelligence adviser to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.

“The two sides agreed that neither country’s government would conduct or knowingly support cyber-enabled theft of intellectual property, including trade secrets or other confidential business information, with the intent of providing competitive advantages to companies or commercial sectors,” an official communiqué drawn up between China and Canada says ...
We'll see ...
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Re: Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread
« Reply #3318 on: June 27, 2017, 07:49:33 »
CHN-IND border hijinks - this, from the BBC:
Quote
China 'asks India to withdraw troops' from Nathu La pass

China has accused India of incursion into its territory between Sikkim and Tibet, in a dispute which has raised tensions between the countries.

Officials said Indian border guards had obstructed "normal activities" on the Chinese side, and called on India to immediately withdraw them.

India also recently accused Chinese troops of incursion on its side.

The area, the Nathu La pass, is used by Indians going for pilgrimages to Hindu and Buddhist sites in Tibet.

The region saw clashes between China and India in 1967, and tensions still flare from time to time.

The BBC's South Asia Editor Ethirajan Anbarasan says the latest development appears to be one of the most serious escalations between the countries in recent years ...
“The risk of insult is the price of clarity.” -- Roy H. Williams

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Re: Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread
« Reply #3319 on: July 01, 2017, 11:19:06 »
The new type 055 destroyer.At 12,000 tons its more like a cruiser with a more potent anti-ship capability.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/anderscorr/2017/07/01/chinas-new-destroyer-the-u-s-navys-anti-ship-missile-failure-and-preemption/#29159adf638f

China unveiled its Type 055 naval destroyer on June 28, the latest step in its decade and a half of military buildup. The new Chinese destroyer outcompetes U.S. destroyers and cruisers, highlighting a major failure in U.S. Navy planning that stretches back to the 1990s. Given the 055’s long-range supersonic YJ-18 and YJ-12 over the horizon (OTH) anti-ship cruise missiles (ASCMs), the Chinese destroyer currently outcompetes U.S. Arleigh Burke class destroyers and bigger Ticonderoga class cruisers. Both ships rely on fewer and shorter-range Harpoon anti-ship missiles (ASMs) and aircraft carriers that are themselves vulnerable to China’s ballistic missiles. The U.S. Long Range Anti-Ship Missile (LRASM), under development since 2009, would right the balance, but not for years to come, and meanwhile we must assume China will continue improving its capabilities.

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Re: Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread
« Reply #3320 on: July 09, 2017, 15:22:08 »
Wonder where PLAN got the design:

Quote
China Explores Electromagnetic Carrier Launch System

A recently released photo on the Chinese Internet has furthered speculation that the People’s Liberation Army Navy (PLAN) has begun trials of an electromagnetic (EM) catapult launch system, known as electromagnetic aircraft launching system (EMALS) in the West. It was previously rumored that China had successfully constructed its first EMALS in November 2016, but there were no official reports or pictures at the time. 

The photo shows a prototype Shenyang J-15T “Flying Shark” with nose gear designed for catapult-assisted takeoff but arrested recovery (CATOBAR) operations. The nose gear also features a front and rear holding rod that is similar to the American EMALS launch rail. The J-15 airframe is derived from Russia’s Sukhoi Su-33 carrier-borne fighter.

Rear Admiral Ma Weiming, the PLAN’s propulsion and power specialist, said in a university seminar that he is confident that the EMALS will be installed on the “No. 3 carrier.” A Chinese analyst noted that this could refer to the third domestically built carrier, not including the Liaoning. Ma also said that the plan to build the No 3 carrier is delayed, since the PLAN is still evaluating both steam and EM catapults. He said that the EMALS is more reliable, less complex and cheaper than the steam catapult and the decision will come in a matter of weeks.

China has already built facilities to test both conventional steam CATOBAR and EM launch systems. Satellite photos of Huangdichun airbase show an EM launch rail parallel to the steam rail.

Professor Wang Qun, an analyst at the National Security and Military Strategy Research Center, noted that using EMALS on a conventionally powered carrier will consume additional fuel and energy and hence compromise the ship’s combat effectiveness. 

Concurrently, Chinese state media has released footage of J-15s conducting numerous sorties on the Liaoning, some of them carrying the YJ-83K anti-ship missile. The carrier group turns towards the South China Sea, where China is asserting its claim of control. According to the Pentagon’s latest report on Chinese military power, the Liaoning task group conducted a second round of integration training there last December.


A J-15 lands on the Chinese aircraft carrier Liaoning, carrying a YJ-83K anti-ship missile. Inset: The J-15T prototype attached with holding rods similar to Western EMAL systems.
https://www.ainonline.com/aviation-news/defense/2017-07-06/china-explores-electromagnetic-carrier-launch-system

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Re: Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread
« Reply #3321 on: July 12, 2017, 12:18:45 »
Chinese military cuts and re-org (Indian story):

Quote
China to downsize army to under a million in biggest troop cut

China will downsize its 2.3 million-strong military, the world's largest, to under one million in the biggest troop reduction in its history as part of a restructuring process, an official Chinese daily said.

The People's Liberation Army (PLA) will increase the numbers of other services, including navy and missile forces, the PLA Daily, the official newspaper of the Chinese military, reported.

Jun Zhengping Studio, a Chinese social WeChat account run by the newspaper published an article yesterday on structural reform in the military, saying that “the old military structure, where the army accounts for the vast majority, will be replaced after the reform”.

“The reform is based on China's strategic goals and security requirements. In the past, the PLA focused on ground battle and homeland defence, which will undergo fundamental changes,” the report said.

“This is the first time that active PLA army personnel would be reduced to below one million,” it said.

It added that the number of troops in the PLA Navy, PLA Strategic Support Force and the PLA Rocket Force will be increased, while the PLA Air Force's active service personnel will remain the same.

According to the Ministry of Defence data, the PLA Army had about 8.50 lakh combat troops in 2013. No official numbers of the total strength of PLA Army were released.

Earlier, Chinese President Xi Jinping had announced that the PLA will be cut by three lakh troops.

“The total PLA personnel was about 2.3 million before the country announced a cut of 300,000 troops in 2015,” state-run Global Times reported.

“This reform will provide other services, including the PLA Rocket Force, Air Force, Navy and Strategic Support Force (mainly responsible for electronic warfare and communication), with more resources and inputs, and the PLA will strengthen its capability to conduct overseas missions,” Xu Guangyu, a senior adviser to the China Arms Control and Disarmament Association, was quoted by the media report...
http://www.thestatesman.com/world/china-to-downsize-army-to-under-a-million-in-biggest-troop-cut-1499835458.html

Last year:

Quote
Xi’s China: Grumbling (and Rumbling?) in the PLA
https://cgai3ds.wordpress.com/2016/10/17/mark-collins-xis-china-grumbling-and-rumbling-in-the-pla/

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Re: Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread
« Reply #3322 on: July 17, 2017, 13:45:53 »
Meanwhile back in the Himalayan military cockpit, from a longish article--Neville Maxwell wrote the book on the 1962 Sino-Indian war:

Quote
This is India’s China war, Round Two
The absurd myth of an ‘unprovoked Chinese aggression’ in 1962 has fermented in India a persistent longing for revenge
By Neville Maxwell

With India and China interacting over more than 3,000km of undefined frontier, friction is constant and that one day it would break back into border war has seemed inevitable. Two great Indian delusions have created this situation.

The lesser of these was the outright falsehood spun in the shock of immediate and utter Indian defeat in 1962’s Round One border war with China, when, after the hesitant launch of an Indian offensive to drive the Chinese out of India-claimed territory on the Chinese side of the McMahon Line, the pre-emptive Chinese counter-attack had in little more than a month crushed the Indian Army. It enabled the People’s Liberation Army (PLA) to vacate all the territory it had occupied with nothing more than the minatory – and humiliating – warning to India, “don’t challenge us again”.

This standoff is China telling India to accept changing realities
http://www.scmp.com/week-asia/geopolitics/article/2102547/standoff-china-telling-india-accept-changing-realities

The absurd myth of an “unprovoked Chinese aggression” which had taken India by surprise was promulgated to resurrect the broken image of “Pandit” Jawaharlal Nehru, the prime minister personally and pre-eminently responsible for the national disaster. Although long ago exposed and belied internationally, in India the myth has fermented in high military as well as political circles a longing for revenge.

Neville Maxwell discloses document revealing that India provoked China into 1962 border war
http://www.scmp.com/news/asia/article/1461099/neville-maxwells-revelation-reveals-india-was-hiding-nothing-over-its-1962

The underlying and greater delusion is that India’s geographical limits are set by millennial historical forces. The process of boundary formation established and required by the international community (negotiation to achieve agreement on border alignment and cooperation to demarcate the agreed alignment on the ground) thus becomes otiose for the Indian republic. India, having “discovered” the alignment of its borders through historical research, need only display them on its official maps and those would become defined international boundaries “not open to discussion with anybody”, as Nehru put it in a notorious order in 1954.

Neville Maxwell interview: the full transcript
http://www.scmp.com/news/china/article/1461102/neville-maxwell-interview-full-transcript

He applied his own ruling literally and categorically, rejecting Beijing’s repeated calls for negotiation; and every one of his scores of successors in the Indian leadership has clung, or felt nailed to, that obdurate and provocative stance, in effect claiming the sole right unilaterally to define China’s as well as India’s borders. Every generation of literate Indians is inculcated with that false sense of national oppression by the cartographic image showing broad areas of Indian territory “occupied” by China, with reminders that Beijing’s maps reveal an intention to seize even more...
http://www.scmp.com/week-asia/geopolitics/article/2102555/indias-china-war-round-two

More at end here on 1962 war and "The Himalayan Military Cockpit":

Quote
Expansionist Dragon Cartography and…
https://cgai3ds.wordpress.com/2014/06/27/mark-collins-expansionist-dragon-cartography-and/


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Re: Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread
« Reply #3323 on: July 19, 2017, 12:06:21 »
What's the PLA Navy's strategic thinking?

Quote
How China's Navy Is Preparing to Fight in the 'Far Seas'

On June 28, the Chinese navy launched the first of a formidable new class of warship. At over twelve thousand tons and bristling with sensors and weapons, the Type 055 destroyer is among the most advanced surface combatants in the world. When completed, it will join the world’s fastest-growing fleet, a service that commissioned twenty-three new surface ships in 2016 alone, compared with just six for the U.S. Navy and zero for the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force. Clearly some great fear or ambition hastens China’s investment in sea power.

But what is it? 

Unfortunately, Beijing is saying very little. And what it does say is unconvincing. For example, PLA Navy officer Zhang Junshe (张军社) claims the Type 055 will protect international sea lanes, upon which the Chinese economy is increasingly dependent, but does not name which country or group threatens them in the first place. He tells us the ship will help fulfill China’s “international responsibilities” (国际责任) and provide “public security goods” (公共安全产品), but these are just meaningless buzzwords that foreigners use—surely they have no purchase in the halls of Zhongnanhai. He suggests the new warship will operate with Chinese aircraft carriers, but where and for what ends, he does not say.

Faced with a lack of reliable information, much foreign analysis of Chinese intentions ultimately rests on a few facts and lots of speculation. Our understanding of Beijing’s designs in waters beyond East Asia—the so-called “Far Seas”—is especially poor. Thus, when candid statements do become available, they deserve careful consideration. In mid-2016, a PLA Navy periodical called Naval Affairs (海军军事学术) published an article that may help shed light on China’s Far Seas naval ambitions. Because Naval Affairs is an “internal distribution” publication—that is, only available to those within the Chinese military—it treats subjects with the rarest of candor. As such, if offers a valuable window into how the PLA Navy actually thinks about strategy.

Entitled “Several Issues China Must Emphasize as it Strategically Manages the Two Oceans Under the New Situation,” the article was written by two PLA Navy officers, both researchers at the Naval Research Institute, the home of Chinese naval strategy. The first author, Lt. Cdr. Tang Jianfeng (唐剑峰), is a staff officer in NRI’s Research Guidance Department. His coauthor is Cdr. Yang Zukui (杨祖快), Deputy Director of NRI’s Research Office. Tang and Yang are mid-level strategists writing about what China’s naval strategy should be, not necessarily what it is. However, their analysis is informed by privileged knowledge of PLA Navy doctrine, existing and planned capabilities, and the aims and preferences of their superiors, whom they naturally seek to please. What does it say?..
http://nationalinterest.org/feature/how-chinas-navy-preparing-fight-the-far-seas-21583?page=show

Read on.  Graphic of Type 055 (cf USN Arleigh Burke-class):



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Re: Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread
« Reply #3324 on: July 19, 2017, 15:12:56 »
Terrible Terry Glavin (a personal friend) has at Canada's comprador-class again:

Quote
China's disgraceful campaign to purge the name of Liu Xiaobo
...
Another fairly reliable indication of just how rattled and gloomy China’s ruling class is that it’s even odds that anyone who can afford to has already left the country, or is considering leaving soon, or is already making plans to leave. Three years ago, a Barclays Wealth survey found that one in three “super-rich” Chinese had already bolted the country, and two out of three millionaires had either already left or were planning to get out. In a new survey published this week, Shanghai’s Hurun magazine and Visas Consulting Group found that half of China’s remaining millionaires are thinking about leaving.

Canada is their second-favourite destination of choice, after the United States, and Vancouver is their favourite Canadian city. More than 100,000 Chinese millionaires have moved to Metro Vancouver in recent years. Most of them obtained Canadian citizenship through the scandal-rocked and now shuttered Immigrant Investor Program [emphasis added]. It should be without controversy to say that these things are “linked.”

Whether China’s millionaires physically leave China or not, they’re sending their money abroad by the container-load...

Meanwhile, in his new capacity as Canada’s ambassador, the comically unserious former cabinet minister John McCallum continues to flounce around China apologizing to sundry gatherings of Communist Party consiglieri about how stubbornly touchy Canadians can be about such free-trade inconveniences as democracy and the rule of law. Back in Canada, the sore point about the “exploratory talks” for a Canada-China free trade deal is supposed to be whether trade and human rights should be linked – as though they weren’t already and haven’t always been inextricably and intimately linked, not least by the regime in Beijing.

The incarceration of dozens of journalists and writers – China is the worst offender in the world for jailing writers – along with the imprisonment of thousands of Chinese prisoners of conscience, is directly linked to the purposes of ensuring the Beijing regime’s continuing, unexamined gluttony in its trade rackets, both foreign and domestic. It’s how business is done in China. It’s how Xi Jinping and his cronies get away with murder...

No matter how impudently or often he bellyaches about it, Lu Shaye, China’s ambassador to Canada, cannot be allowed to get away with the propaganda lie that “Canadian media often mix human rights issue with economic and trade issues.” It is a too-rare occasion, or at least not nearly done often enough, for one thing, but more pertinently, it is Lu’s own Communist Party that insists on the linkage, except in this way: anyone messes with us on human rights, we’ll mess with them on trade...

There are...also quite obvious, direct and functional links between the way China’s princelings amass and hide their fortunes and the way Canada’s Liberal-heavy China trade lobby serves as a happy accomplice and collaborator in the intimidation, persecution and plunder of the Chinese people [emphasis added].

The moment Liu Xiaobo died, in the eighth year of an 11-year sentence for appending his name to a modest democratic charter, Canada’s Governor General was swanning around in Beijing with Xi Jinping. His Excellency David Johnston was lavished with much complimentary notice in China’s news media – which had been scrubbed of any reference to Liu Xiaobo’s agonies...
http://ottawacitizen.com/opinion/columnists/glavin-chinas-disgraceful-campaign-to-purge-the-name-of-liu-xiaobo
 
Compradors--China now getting its revenge on the West:
https://www.britannica.com/topic/comprador

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