Author Topic: World War Two Voice Procedure (1944-45) - requesting help  (Read 5300 times)

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Offline Michael Dorosh

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I have some references on Voice Procedure, specifically FSPB Part 1 No. 4 dated 1944 as well as A BACKWARDS GLANCE: THE PERSONAL STORY OF AN INFANTRY SIGNALLER IN THE CALGARY HIGHLANDERS IN WORLD WAR TWO.

I have some specific questions about VP if anyone can help, with the 1944-45 period in mind.

Today, an Infantry company has specific procedures and call signs (please correct me if I'm wrong)

1 - "A" Company HQ
19 - "A" Company commander (OC)
19A - "A" Company 2 i/c
19C - Company Sergeant Major
19D - Company Quartermaster Sergeant
11 - 1 Platoon
11A - 1 Platoon, 1 Section
11B - 1 Platoon, 2 Section
12 - 2 Platoon
13 - 3 Platoon

I know that it was in WW II that the appointment titles were developed - ie
Sunray - company commander
Sunray Minor - company 2 i/c

Did the "niner" call signs exist as such back then as well?

I got a bit of info from:

http://members.tripod.com/~nigelef/artycomm.htm

I am interested in simulating radio traffic for a display regarding an infantry company headquarters in the 1944-45 period and would like to get a historically accurate "script".

There were considerably fewer radios in use in a battalion then; the 38 set could be used at the platoon level but I get the feeling it very often wasn't, and comms was achieved via runner or possibly by land line in defended areas. Did the CSM, CQMS have call signs then?

Calling and receiving stations also used the call sign of the sender, if I am not mistaken, and the company call sign would be changed daily to a one or two word code, again, is that correct? ie "A" Company would be Mike One, "B" Company Mike Two, Battalion HQ would be Mike, etc.

Also, if anyone has a diagram of a WWII era battalion radio net, I'd be grateful for a scan or description.
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Offline Jack Neilson

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Re: World War Two Voice Procedure (1944-45) - requesting help
« Reply #1 on: April 21, 2005, 15:26:15 »

Try sending your request to Ed Dorion, secretary of the Signals Club associated with the Sigs Museum in Kingston.  he can put it out on his e-list and possibly get answers for you frrom those who were active in WW II.  Another possibility is throught the museum web page at http://www.c-and-e-museum.org/
Ed  Dorion e-mail the-sigs-club@sympatico.ca

Velox Versutus Vigilans

Offline Michael Dorosh

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Re: World War Two Voice Procedure (1944-45) - requesting help
« Reply #2 on: April 21, 2005, 15:39:43 »
Many thanks. I'll also contact Joe Coestello at rcsigs.ca

Thanks again
Mike
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Offline Michael O'Leary

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Re: World War Two Voice Procedure (1944-45) - requesting help
« Reply #3 on: April 21, 2005, 19:30:45 »
Mike, I have a 1952 edition of Signal Training (All Arms); Pamphlet No. 7; Procedure for Radio Telephony. Let me knoiw if you can't find an earlier source.

(This copy is even stamped for "A Coy, Calgary Highlanders.)

Offline Michael Dorosh

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Re: World War Two Voice Procedure (1944-45) - requesting help
« Reply #4 on: April 21, 2005, 19:33:15 »
Mike, I have a 1952 edition of Signal Training (All Arms); Pamphlet No. 7; Procedure for Radio Telephony. Let me knoiw if you can't find an earlier source.

(This copy is even stamped for "A Coy, Calgary Highlanders.)

I think you need to return that stolen property immediately, Mister! ;D

I don't imagine scanning it would be economical of your time unless you have a high speed scanner and can photocopy the manual easily.

I'd be interested in seeing it either way, even if only to outline Korean War era procedures on my website vice WW II if it turns out they are different.

Don't imagine the manual is up for sale?
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Re: World War Two Voice Procedure (1944-45) - requesting help
« Reply #5 on: April 28, 2005, 23:46:34 »
 Hi Mike

In between trips south I will try to find my copy of Radio Telephony Procedure for the Canadian Army, circa 43/44. I'll contact you then & try to get you a copy.  The 19 set was the most common "portable"
in the CA at that time.

Cheers

Offline Michael Dorosh

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Re: World War Two Voice Procedure (1944-45) - requesting help
« Reply #6 on: April 29, 2005, 00:17:29 »
Hi Mike

In between trips south I will try to find my copy of Radio Telephony Procedure for the Canadian Army, circa 43/44. I'll contact you then & try to get you a copy.  The 19 set was the most common "portable"
in the CA at that time.

Cheers

Thanks, I appreciate that.  I think you mean the 18 set; the 19 set was a vehicle mount. I just built a mockup 18 set for our display. The 38 set was more portable, but less common.
"So, how's your sister?" -Brigadeführer Hermann Fegelein
 
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Re: World War Two Voice Procedure (1944-45) - requesting help
« Reply #7 on: April 30, 2005, 15:48:26 »
Hi Mike.

I threw in the 19 as a portable because of pictures in Dad's Arty Rgt history book.  He started the 2nd big scheme in Arty & went through several remusters (deleted in records).  There is several pix of the "portable" version of the 19 on a sled.  The other is on a skid being grunted.  Not my idea of fun!
I also remember references to the portable from some of the vets that trained me.  The batts for the C42's were around a 100 pounds & the 42 was about the same weight so it is a really scary platoon thing to grunt.  Got rid of my 19 set a couple of years ago instead of mounting it in the deuce.
cheers