Author Topic: Requirements for females in the fitness test  (Read 4191 times)

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Offline Lilspark

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Requirements for females in the fitness test
« on: June 29, 2005, 19:19:55 »
 Hi, my fiance has been in the army for 10 years and I've strongly been considering joining, however i'm not sure how well I would do on the fitness portion or if it's different for women. Currently I can run a half marathon (21k) and do 50-75 situps  ::), not so great at pushups and not sure how to improve on them. Also if you spouse is in the military is there a way to be posted at the same base? I also have a psychology degree and am not sure what kind of job I'd be appropriate for. :)

Offline Bert

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Re: Requirements for females in the fitness test
« Reply #1 on: June 30, 2005, 01:33:28 »
You'll get many opinions on the forums and its best to talk to the local CFRC and get the facts.

However, you seem to be in good shape.  To improve push-ups, I'd recommend an all-around-body
weight program.  Specifically, the bench press, inclined bench press, shoulder press, lat pull down,
and tricep curls are good exercises if orientated for strength training and will bring up push-up
counts relatively quickly. 

Another thing to consider is over-all fitness.  From one point of view, training just for
improving Express Test push-ups may increase numbers but puts less focus on other parts of
the body.  In BMQ and in later operations, you may be climbing obstacles, running, marching,
carrying loads, working at a higher than normal tempo.  Training to improve over-all stength,
endurance, and cardio is a better objective than just push-ups.  In this regard, the training in
preparation for BMQ/military career is similar for men and women I think. 

If you are unsure of how well you would do, try running 2.4 kms and time yourself.  Perform
as many pushups as you can continuously, you've already done sit-ups, and compare it
to the CF Express Test requirements. 

As far as miltiary couples being posted ot the same unit, it is and can be done but there may
be limitations.  Better to ask the CFRC.

Good luck.


Offline jwsteele

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Re: Requirements for females in the fitness test
« Reply #2 on: June 30, 2005, 14:53:03 »
From the information you have provided...most candidates (men and women) would be envious of your posistion.  Halk-marathons, 50-75 situps, etc.  It is pretty clear that you are fit enough.  I'd bet you could do at least 9 pushups as well.  With a degree, you already meet the basic qualifications for most officer jobs.  Already, you appear to be a competitive candidate.  If you do decide to apply, I think they would snatch you up pretty fast depending on the occupation you select.  I wouldn't worry about anything.  But like the post above..best to check with your CFRC as they have all the official information.  Good luck.

Offline Lilspark

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Re: Requirements for females in the fitness test
« Reply #3 on: June 30, 2005, 20:26:53 »
Thanks for the info, I'm a petite person and I already do full body weight workouts at the gym on base gagetown, one other worry is the ruck sack- if I would ever have to carry one in what ever position I would go for, I only weigh 100 pounds and I know those things can be 50. I do bench presses, rows, tricep extentions and pull downs, scull crushers, shoulder presses, assisted chin ups and  hammer curls right now for upper body, my problem with the pushup is that I can't seem to get the form down correctly, keeping my body straight is where I'm having difficulty  :(. How do I start the process of being evaluated  for the Army :salute:?

Offline Bert

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Re: Requirements for females in the fitness test
« Reply #4 on: June 30, 2005, 21:40:11 »
You sound like a serious trainer.   Weight exercises for the lower back (abs and back for a strong core)
and legs would compliment the upper body and ab workout you already do.  

The ruck-sack is not something you carry around like a set of weights.   Its designed with strapping
and forms to the body when properly adjusted so you can stand straight without stress to the
lower back or the shoulders.     It more about mechanical advantage than dead weight.   If you
know any members with ruck-sacks around or a knowledgable outfitter, ask them to show you
how its worn and positioned on the body.   It may provide more insight.

Like the ruck-sack, a push-up is a mechanical process.   The feet provide a pivot point, the back
is maintained straight like a board, and the thumbs are positioned under the shoulders.   Only the
arms move body up and down.   To get a feel for it, put your back against the wall.   Take note
of the position and the feel of the body when its straight.   Maintain that feeling while performing
a push-up.   Also, having someone there watching your push-ups and correcting
the alignment of your back helps.   Some people tense the abs and the back into a rigid form.  
Others re-adjust the positioning of the feet to avoid arching the back.   Theres various techniques.

To get the technique down, lie down on th floor first, position the hands and feet, and perform
a set of push-ups slowly.   Memorize the technique that provides a straight back in the maneuver.  
Then increase the pace of the pushups, but only as fast as proper technique can be maintained.

To start the process, its a s easy as going to the CFRC and getting the forms.   You'll fill out
the forms, acquire the proper documentation, hand in the forms, take the CFAT test,
undertake a medical with a CF physician's assistant, and have an interview with a recruiter.   You'll
get a conditional job offer and if its all good and wait for the fitness test.   If the fitness test
is passed, then you're good to go and attend BMQ as arranged in the job offer documentation.
The process can take 6 -12 months depending on alot of factors so theres lots of time to train,
consider, and prepare.  
« Last Edit: June 30, 2005, 21:46:30 by Bert »

Offline Allan Luomala

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Re: Requirements for females in the fitness test
« Reply #5 on: June 30, 2005, 22:37:50 »
A 50 lb rucksack is actually "light". The Army Fitness Standard rucksack weight is only ~35lbs, which is a complete joke. I carried a rucksack that weighed over 100lbs (plus weapon and radio) for Op Grizzly (G8 Summit security) and trudged through the Rocky Mountains, and troops in Afghanistan on operations carried similar weights (and probably more).

Obviously, if you are going into a "soft" trade (or element (ie air force) this won't be a concern, but you have to be prepared for at least 35lbs (plus fighting order:Tactical vest (or webbing), helmet and weapon, which all told is 54lbs (if I recall correctly), so I would suggest working up to at least 50lbs, if not more (just to make sure that you can handle the minimal requirements with ease).

Al

Offline Chief Clerk

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Re: Requirements for females in the fitness test
« Reply #6 on: July 01, 2005, 00:05:23 »
Hi, my fiance has been in the army for 10 years and I've strongly been considering joining, however i'm not sure how well I would do on the fitness portion or if it's different for women. Currently I can run a half marathon (21k) and do 50-75 situps  Roll Eyes, not so great at pushups and not sure how to improve on them. Also if you spouse is in the military is there a way to be posted at the same base? I also have a psychology degree and am not sure what kind of job I'd be appropriate for. Smiley


Hello, my better half joined four years ago after following me around for 26 years - she is finishing up her degree in Nursing and will be an Officer in the Canadian Forces next year.  Get in contact with any Canadian Forces Base PSP (Gym) staff and they can explain the fitness test or call your CFRC.  Depending on your fitness level and age - St Jean (BootCamp) can be easy or hard.  You seem to be in good shape from the above - and, yes the pushups can be a little testy (St Jean will want you to do them a certain way - ask your PSP Staff).  If enrolled as an Officer you would have to do an Initial Assessment Phase (IAP) which is bootcamp learning you drill, dress, deportment, general service knowledge, fitness, etc.  Then you would go on  a BOTC (Basic Officer Traning Course) which concentrates on Leadership, small party taskings, communicating,  little bit more general service knowledge, etc  and the paperwork world of the Canadian Forces.
Ask the CFRC about enrolling as an Officer (seeing you have a degree) I am sure there is a plan in which you can enroll under.  We have Personnel Selection Officers, etc that would certainly fit your degree.  CFRC can give you the low down on all occupations available to you with your degree.
Yes if your spouse is military you can get posted to the Same Base - this only becomes difficult if he or she was in the Infantry, Artillery, Hard Navy, etc,  as these guys are limited to where they can serve.

Chief Clerk out.