Author Topic: CH-148 Cyclone Progress  (Read 643266 times)

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Offline Eye In The Sky

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Re: CH-148 Cyclone Progress
« Reply #1050 on: April 12, 2019, 20:21:14 »
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CH-148 Cyclones Significantly Expand Surveillance Area, RCAF Says

The Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) CH-148 Cyclones by Sikorsky significantly improve upon the surveillance area of the Sikorsky CH-124 Sea Kings, which the RCAF retired late last year, according to RCAF Col. Sid Connor, commander of 12 Wing in Shearwater, Nova Scotia.

"We can see 10 times farther underwater, and the Cyclone's radar and ESM (electronic warfare support measures) capabilities give us a chance to do above water surveillance 10 times greater than before," he said. "The Cyclone can identify contacts for the ship captain. On any given flight, the area you are able to pick up, whether that's identifying narcotics trafficking or unidentified smaller vessels, is 10 times greater, or 100 times as much area."

Two Cyclones are deployed — one aboard the Royal Canadian Navy's Halifax-class frigate, HMCS Regina, in the Middle East, to support Operation Artemis, the Canadian portion of CTF 150 — a multi-nation effort to battle terrorists and illicit flows of drugs, weapons, and people. The other deployed CH-148 is aboard the HMCS Toronto, in the Black Sea in support of Operation Reassurance — the Canadian contingent of NATO European deterrence efforts in Central and Eastern Europe.

In February, the Royal Canadian Navy accepted delivery of the 17th CH-148 of a planned acquisition of 28 by 2021 to replace the venerable Sea King anti-submarine warfare helicopters.

The February delivery marked the ninth CH-148 Block 2 aircraft in the field. The Royal Canadian Navy has accepted two Block 2 Cyclones and seven upgrades of 15 Block 1 Cyclones to the Block 2 configuration. Sikorsky has four of those 17 CH-148s and is upgrading them to Block 2 configuration.

Block 2 Cyclones include situational awareness enhancements, an upgraded Northrop Grumman AN/AAR-47(V)2 missile approach warning system, avionics upgrades, and sea state 6 capability.

In addition, operational tests of Block 2.1 are to begin late next year with the possible delivery of the first CH-148 with Block 2.1 in 2021. Block 2.1 upgrades mission systems and sensor integration and increases component time between maintenance. For example, gear boxes are to increase from 600 hours of life to 2,000 hours.

The Cylone's "radar, sonar, and ESM are all connected to online databases, so as they encounter other contacts, the data base grows and the sensors get smarter," Connor said. That experience informs how the RCAF may use the Cyclone against potential adversaries, he said. The RCAF Lockheed Martin CP-140 Aurora aircraft has a similar data learning profile.

Powered by two General Electric CT7-8A7 turboshaft engines, the CH-148's advertised maximum speed is 155 knots, 10 percent faster than the Sea King, according to the Royal Canadian Air Force.

The Cyclone is to perform a variety of missions, including surveillance, utility, search-and-rescue, and tactical transport for national and international security efforts. Incorporating flaw tolerance and engine burst containment, the helicopter also has an aluminum and composite airframe that has lightning-strike and high-intensity radio frequency pulse protection, the Royal Canadian Air Force said.

Members of the Royal Canadian Air Force praised the performance of the CH-148 after it returned in January from its first international deployment aboard HMCS Ville de Québec, in support of Operation Reassurance.
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Offline OceanBonfire

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Re: CH-148 Cyclone Progress
« Reply #1051 on: April 30, 2019, 15:30:14 »
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It’s a Navy first! Last week a #RCAF Cyclone helicopter was working with a #RCNavy ORCA class vessel off Victoria #BC. #MARPAC

https://twitter.com/MARPAC_FMARP/status/1123251487012839424








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Check out these images from April 19 of a Canadian CH-148 Cyclone from Canadian frigate HMCS Toronto conducting the first ever Cyclone torpedo drop by an operational crew at sea to bring the helo to full Anti-Submarine Warfare status while in the Med with #SNMG2.

https://twitter.com/NATO_MARCOM/status/1123221026396082177





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Offline Eye In The Sky

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Re: CH-148 Cyclone Progress
« Reply #1052 on: April 30, 2019, 23:44:33 »
Nice pics!  Love the one of the torp falling.
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Offline Colin P

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Re: CH-148 Cyclone Progress
« Reply #1053 on: May 01, 2019, 12:02:52 »
What the device in the foreground sticking out of the ship? Some sort of launcher?

Offline Sub-normal

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Re: CH-148 Cyclone Progress
« Reply #1054 on: May 01, 2019, 13:24:19 »
What the device in the foreground sticking out of the ship? Some sort of launcher?
  That is one of the surface launch torpedo tubes.

Offline Spencer100

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Re: CH-148 Cyclone Progress
« Reply #1055 on: August 15, 2019, 22:13:33 »
Question.  From another forum.  The Cyclone can't land on water like the Sea King?  I would say no. But just checking. 

Is that a big loss of a capability?  Was it used much?  I remember seeing Prince William do it in a Canadian Sea King a few years ago.

Offline Baz

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Re: CH-148 Cyclone Progress
« Reply #1056 on: August 16, 2019, 06:41:36 »
Question.  From another forum.  The Cyclone can't land on water like the Sea King?  I would say no. But just checking. 

Is that a big loss of a capability?  Was it used much?  I remember seeing Prince William do it in a Canadian Sea King a few years ago.

No, the Cyclone can't.

The Sea King couldn't land on water operationally.  It was for emergencies.  The pilot's were trained to get the aircraft back off the water in some cases, or to shut down and hopefully not catch a tip to facilitate crew egress .

What Prince William did was called waterbird training.  It was discontinued some years before the retirement as it ate a lot of hours.

Offline Underway

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Re: CH-148 Cyclone Progress
« Reply #1057 on: August 16, 2019, 09:37:49 »
Question.  From another forum.  The Cyclone can't land on water like the Sea King?  I would say no. But just checking. 

No, the Cyclone can't.

Is an emergency landing considered a type of crash?  The Cyclone does have three airbags that inflate (can be inflated?) upon an emergency water landing.  One on each side of the cockpit and another under the rear fuselage.  They only designed to keep the helo floating upright long enough for crew egress.

Offline Baz

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Re: CH-148 Cyclone Progress
« Reply #1058 on: August 16, 2019, 11:02:19 »
Is an emergency landing considered a type of crash?  The Cyclone does have three airbags that inflate (can be inflated?) upon an emergency water landing.  One on each side of the cockpit and another under the rear fuselage.  They only designed to keep the helo floating upright long enough for crew egress.

Most if not all overwater helicopters have emergency flotation systems, including the Sea King which had one in each sponsor.

The Sea King had a "boat shaped" hull and could attempt to take off after a water landing, if the crew was trained (hence waterboard training).  For the Cyclone a subsequent take-off or long term towing should not be attempted.

Normally emergency landings and crashes are different.  An emergency landing is under control and a crash isn't.  In the case of a crash it is unlikely the aircraft remains upright and the bags can be deployed... you just try to get out.

The Cyclone bags can be deployed by the pilots or will automatically deploy upon water entry if armed, which is not normally armed.  It's armed as part of the pre-ditching procedures and for over water take-offs and landings.

Also significantly the Cyclone life raft is mounted externally which can be deployed from the cockpit, again like most if not all modern overwater helicopters.  The Sea King raft wasn't... it was next to the troop seat and had to be dragged to the cargo door and manually deployed.

Offline Eye In The Sky

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Re: CH-148 Cyclone Progress
« Reply #1059 on: August 27, 2019, 17:30:20 »
« Last Edit: August 27, 2019, 18:39:52 by Eye In The Sky »
Everything happens for a reason.

Sometimes the reason is you're stupid and make bad decisions.