Author Topic: The Defence Budget [superthread]  (Read 464554 times)

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Online MarkOttawa

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Re: The Defence Budget [superthread]
« Reply #1850 on: July 09, 2018, 19:04:51 »
Trudeau government's planned defence spending from Dave Perry of CGAI--note big capital boost in mid-2020s, for new RCAF fighters and RCN CSCs (via a tweet):
https://twitter.com/DavePerryCGAI/status/1016363536971436034

Quote

Bets on those 88 new planes and 15 new ships?

Mark
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Ça explique, mais ça n'excuse pas.

Offline Chris Pook

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Re: The Defence Budget [superthread]
« Reply #1851 on: July 09, 2018, 22:15:00 »
Looks like the intention is for a constabulary force right about the time the oilsands are phased out.......

The future's so bright I've got to wear shades.
"Wyrd bið ful aræd"

Offline Ostrozac

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Re: The Defence Budget [superthread]
« Reply #1852 on: July 10, 2018, 03:10:07 »
Looks like the intention is for a constabulary force right about the time the oilsands are phased out.......

The future's so bright I've got to wear shades.

There's really nothing wrong with building a constabulary/counterinsurgency force. There is room for such a force in the world's spectrum of conflict. What is wrong is if we delude ourselves that such a force can go toe to toe with any serious fighting force. A constabulary force has no business in the Baltics or North Korea, but might prove quite useful in places like Mali or Haiti. But that would require cutting our coat according to the cloth, instead we seem to be existing in a strange half-world, where our doctrine says we can fight a high-end opponent, but our equipment says we only fight low-end rag-tag insurgents. This contradiction has significant risk; the truth may catch us up one day, and we may end up in a fight with an enemy that we simply can't handle.

Offline suffolkowner

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Re: The Defence Budget [superthread]
« Reply #1853 on: July 15, 2018, 14:22:44 »

Offline PuckChaser

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Re: The Defence Budget [superthread]
« Reply #1854 on: July 15, 2018, 14:47:03 »
Are we actually making progress on Strong Secure Engaged?

Considering the current speed of the procurement process, I strongly doubt any of these projects were started after the 2015 Election, or even after SSE was released in early 2017.

Offline Good2Golf

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Re: The Defence Budget [superthread]
« Reply #1855 on: July 15, 2018, 15:09:29 »
Considering the current speed of the procurement process, I strongly doubt any of these projects were started after the 2015 Election, or even after SSE was released in early 2017.

Both those projects were on public record and published in DND’s Defence Acquisition Guide (DAG) before the 2015 election and certainly before SSE.

Perhaps the CANSOF King Airs may advance, but not sure Cormorant upgrade will happen before the 2019 election. ???

Regards
G2G

Offline suffolkowner

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Re: The Defence Budget [superthread]
« Reply #1856 on: July 16, 2018, 14:23:40 »
so we're progressing at treading water that's something at least! baby steps

Offline Rifleman62

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Re: The Defence Budget [superthread]
« Reply #1857 on: March 05, 2019, 09:08:08 »
Quote
Re: F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF)
« Reply #4379 on: Yesterday at 19:22:52 »
Quote
Quote from: Colin P on Yesterday at 12:22:01 Sigh we will be a "near peer" to Singapore


FJAG: I don't think that we'll measure up.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Equipment_of_the_Singaporean_Army

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Republic_of_Singapore_Air_Force#Aircraft

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Republic_of_Singapore_Navy#Current_fleet
:brickwall:


MILITARY SPENDING LESS THAN PROMISED - National Post - 5 Mar 19 - LEE BERTHIAUME

OTTAWA • The federal government will invest billions of dollars less in new military equipment than promised this year, raising concerns about the readiness of the Canadian Forces and the prospect that Canada will fall short on another NATO spending target. The Trudeau government in 2017 released a defence policy that included dramatic increases in the amount of money to be spent on new aircraft, ships, armoured vehicles and other military equipment each year for the next two decades. The investments are considered vital to replacing the Canadian Forces’ aging fighter jets, ships and other equipment with state-of-theart vehicles and weapons.

Yet while the government is on track to invest more in new equipment for the second year in a row, budget documents show the Defence Department will still fall short more than $2 billion (35% is a huge amt) on the government’s plan to spend $6.5 billion.The government spent $2.3 billion less than planned last year, largely because of delays in projects such as the government’s huge plan to buy new warships, though also because some things ended up costing less than expected.

The department’s top civil servant, deputy minister Jody Thomas, told a House of Commons committee last week that about $700 million was because some projects came in under budget (gov't/Cdn military procurement under budget??) and other “efficiencies (don't buy anything), so we didn’t need that money. (??)

But Thomas acknowledged the department was to blame for some of the other underspending, and industry has also faced challenges in delivering on projects — although she said it shouldn’t be a surprise there have been some problems given the number of projects underway. “There are going to be some slowdowns by us,” she said, adding: “If money isn’t moving quite quickly enough because of a problem with a particular supply chain, a particular supplier, a contract, the way we’ve defined a project, we work with industry to try to resolve that.”

Still, Defence Minister Harjit Sajjan acknowledged to the same committee that while the government is spending more on military equipment than previous years, “we need to get enough people to be able to handle the volume of projects. (more civ/mil at HDHQ) We need to get better at that.” Defence officials have previously blamed a shortage of procurement experts for some project delays and cost overruns. That shortage was created by successive cuts to the department starting under the Liberals in the 1990s and continued under the Conservatives earlier this decade.

While the fact the department saved money on some projects was seen as a positive development, Conservative defence critic James Bezan said he is nonetheless concerned that hundreds of millions of dollars in promised new investments aren’t being realized.
“Despite the explanation that was given by officials at committee, we still feel projects are falling behind, promises are going to be broken and ultimately the Canadian Armed Forces will not get the equipment that it needs in a timely manner,” Bezan told The Canadian Press. “The whole idea that they’re finding efficiencies is good news. But at the same time, those dollars should be getting re-invested in other capital projects that aren’t off the books yet.”

The underspending doesn’t just mean delivery of some promised equipment will be delayed, said defence analyst David Perry of the Canadian Global Affairs Institute; it also threatens Canada’s ability to meet a key NATO spending target. “So the military is not getting re-equipped as fast as intended when the defence policy was published,” Perry said in an interview. “And we had basically reassured NATO that we were going to really do a good job at spending on recapitalization, and we’re not nearly as far ahead as we should be on that.”
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