Author Topic: Precision and Accuracy in the call for fire  (Read 35745 times)

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Offline Old Sweat

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Re: Precision and Accuracy in the call for fire
« Reply #50 on: January 14, 2012, 07:10:32 »
I guess the first question is what kind of accuracy does the FOO need?

I am not going to state the obvious about his own orientation and fixation, but without accuracy here, everything else is pointless. For whatever it is worth, I had a conversation yesterday with a friend who had been in the Airborne Battery when it exercised in the High Arctic. They were subject to large changes in magnetic variation over short distances and used to use devices/techniques such as a gyro, azimuth by polaris and a sun compass. This was in the bad old pre-GPS days, but there may be a hint there. If you wish to explore this, PM me and I will put you in touch.

Offline GnyHwy

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Re: Precision and Accuracy in the call for fire
« Reply #51 on: February 28, 2012, 13:25:43 »
I guess the first question is what kind of accuracy does the FOO need?

That is a good question, and as simple as it may sound, is a very complex question.  Situation to situation will dictate and the standard answer of "it depends" does apply, but until we define this, the status quo of digital magnetic compasses (DMC) may have to suffice.

I believe there is somewhat of a blind faith that DMCs are giving correct orientation; "it's digital it must be accurate".  Persons who have done research know this is not true.  When an observer uses a bad direction, even off by 100mils (which is not unlikely), the initial round is off by 100m at 1km.  100mils is very easy to be off, and can easily go unnoticed, until the round hits the ground of course.  Simple magnetic forces such as vehicles, buildings and power lines etc. will make this happen, and with the potential for urban operations ever growing, this becomes even more likely; 100m in a built up area with close proximity friendlies can be a very big deal.

Maybe a better question may be "at what accuracy do we need orientation to be guaranteed"?  If you were to say 20mils, which is the standard arty double check, I would argue that DMCs can't even guarantee that; below 5 mils is barely attainable even in perfect environments.

Gyros and GPS can guarantee less than 5 mil, but they also have their limitations; bulk, vibrations, GPS signal and power requirements are just a few.

Digital mapping is another solution, but again, there are plenty of limitations there as well.

Up north is another can of worms all together.  It would be back to pirate days and sextants for accuracy up there, not to mention that your map is just a sheet of white paper with grid lines on it.
« Last Edit: February 28, 2012, 13:30:32 by GnyHwy »

Offline GnyHwy

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Re: Precision and Accuracy in the call for fire
« Reply #52 on: May 07, 2015, 07:29:08 »
For the naysayers that believe that the Arty is just an area weapon and that our double checks and "minuscule" calculations are a waste of time or not necessary, tell that to these guys.

Of course the naysayers will chalk it up as a bad target location and dismiss it, but for those of us who know, there are plenty more things that could make this happen. 

Thank goodness those naysayers are a dying breed.

https://www.facebook.com/FUNKER530/videos/932595823458721/?fref=nf