Author Topic: Boot cleaning / polishing / care of  (Read 463690 times)

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Offline Troopasaurus

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Boot cleaning / polishing / care of
« on: September 16, 2002, 00:34:00 »
post your good tips for boot shining here ill start

 first get alot of polish on your boots and melt with heat do this repeatedly until you have a good base on it then buff next take a small amount of polish apply in small circles breath like you would into cold hands (hot breath) then do small circles repeat till you can no longer see the circles

BestOfTheBest

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Re: Boot shining
« Reply #1 on: September 16, 2002, 16:10:00 »
Tell us more
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Offline ~RoKo~

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Re: Boot shining
« Reply #2 on: September 16, 2002, 18:46:00 »
Careful not actually light the polish on fire when you heat it. Unless, of course, you want your boot to start flaking.

The best thing I‘ve found is to just use ‘Kiwi Parade Gloss‘ instead of the regular black kiwi. get‘s ‘em shiney enough to pass an inspection.

sgt.shmedly102

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Re: Boot shining
« Reply #3 on: September 17, 2002, 03:53:00 »
The only way to get a really good (and durable) shine is to build up many thin layers. If you try to glob it on, or use some ‘trick‘, you may get an impressive shine, but it won‘t last and therefore, won‘t protect the leather. Of course you can‘t just take a new pair of boots out of the box and expect to get a good spit shine. I would suggest simply brush shining them while you break them in. Then after a few weeks you should have a good enough base to spit shine. Only spit shine the toe and heel (the hard parts); if you spit shine the leather where it flexes, it will crack. Use cotton balls, a  little  bit of water and a  little  bit of kiwi, and make small, circular motions with very light pressure. After a few months, you‘ll find your boots require less work to get them looking good.

Of course, if you‘re going to the field, your main concern is protecting and waterproofing the leather, so a good brush shine should be sufficient.

fortuncookie5084

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Re: Boot shining
« Reply #4 on: September 17, 2002, 16:22:00 »
As someone who has done the Ceremonial Guard in Ottawa a few times, I think I can offer an opinion that not only reflects extensive boot shining experience (oh boy does that sound lame) combined with extremely heavy use of highly shined drill boots.  Anyway, I‘ve seen all kinds of tricks which all invariably fail.  You need a good base coat applied thickly and brushed off.  After 20 or so of those then you spit shine with regular kiwi.  Many small applications.  If you apply it thickly it WILL crack and then you‘re stuck with bad boots and a slot on that evening defaulters‘ parade.  A burn shine is a very risky gamble.  I‘ve seen it work and the result is impressive.  The other 99 out of 100 times the boots will be completely ruined and you will be doing a very fast left-right-left at the CSM‘s charge parade.  

So here it is:  Base coats. Then many (4 per day is what I do for the first month) thin coats of regular kiwi--parade gloss is a gimmick.  After the first month you have enough of a shine built up that you can actually slack off somewhat.  Eventually one quick shine will do it.  Like everything else in the Army and in life it takes hard work to see results.

fortuncookie5084

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Re: Boot shining
« Reply #5 on: September 17, 2002, 16:27:00 »
Another point.  In order to reduce the chance for the boots to crack, you will always shine them once and then wear them for a bit.  Walk around.  Work on your other kit (when I‘m on tasking I shine my boots, then wear them while ironing my pants and shirts).  Always wear them after shining, then shine them some more.

Offline ~RoKo~

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Re: Boot shining
« Reply #6 on: September 17, 2002, 17:30:00 »
I‘ve heard about burning boots being a chargeable offense, what exactly is illegal about it? the burning itself, or ruining your boots?

fortuncookie5084

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Re: Boot shining
« Reply #7 on: September 17, 2002, 23:05:00 »
It is indeed a chargeable offense which I‘ve seen enforced.  A burn shine gone wrong completely destroys the serviceability and appearance of the boot. It is impossible to hide it or attribute the damage to anything else.  It has to do with the extreme heat of the fire drying out the leather. The boots will fall apart when you‘re wearing them.  A burn shine gone right will also destroy the serviceability of the boot (future boot polishing will not yield the proper result due to the damaged leather), but the damage will not be as extensive or apparent.

Offline ~RoKo~

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Re: Boot shining
« Reply #8 on: September 17, 2002, 23:59:00 »
Ah.. Makes sense. You don‘t want your big black cadilacs to break down on a ruck march...

toms3

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Re: Boot shining
« Reply #9 on: September 18, 2002, 10:53:00 »
I had a function to attened a few weeks back.  30 mins before I had to leave I realized that I had not touch my Parade boots.  So, I grabbed them and did a speed spit shine on them.  Lucky for me...I have had the same boots for such a long time it only need a quick freshing up back to a nice refective shine.

  :D

Offline combat_medic

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Re: Boot shining
« Reply #10 on: September 18, 2002, 11:43:00 »
You know, it IS possible to do a "burn shine" without actually involving an open flame... all you need is for the polish to melt, and it doesn‘t take that much heat to do it. You can acheive the desired effect using a hair dryer on a hot setting (guys can borrow their wife/girlfriend/sister‘s one), or you can use a heat gun, if you happen to have one. Using a lighter in close proximity to the boot, without burning the leather itself also isn‘t that hard. Just hold the lighter close to the boot until the polish melts (aboout 0.5 seconds).

Of course, all of this should be done as your final coat of polish after applying many, many base layers. I‘ve gotten really consistent results with it, probably because I do put the time into those 3-4 coats each time I polish before the burn polish layer. If you‘re trying to find a quick, easy cheat, it won‘t work!!!

I‘ve heard horror stories of cadets who use windex, turtle wax, candle wax, vaseline, and all sorts of other garbage on boots, but for the long-term, nothing wields a good result like a little elbow grease.
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Offline Dixon

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Re: Boot shining
« Reply #11 on: September 25, 2002, 21:43:00 »
Want a Horror story? I took SIC this summer in Cold Lake and there was a cadet who used rubbing alcohol and the paste from inside batterys to get a shine out of his boots and yet he managed a shine, but his boots didnt flex at all. Poor Sucker was sore on our 4 hour grad parade  :D
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Offline portcullisguy

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Re: Boot shining
« Reply #12 on: September 26, 2002, 02:23:00 »
While I didn‘t have the time to make the shine absolutely parade-ground gleaming, this trick worked for me:

- Melt the wax IN the can!  Light it up with a lighter, let the top melt, put the lid back on to put the flame out.  You will have a layer of liquid polish.  I found it easier to apply and fill any divots, scuffs, etc., with the small round boot brush.

- After applying a thin layer of this and allowing it to dry, I then buffed with the soft cloth, re-applied polish, and then buffed again.

Didn‘t bring me a mirror shine, but only because I didn‘t stick with it long enough...

Used this technique to bring drab black dress shoes up to a courtroom-approved shine, and same with my customs work boots (which are crap to begin with).
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Offline PikaChe

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Re: Boot shining
« Reply #13 on: September 26, 2002, 13:55:00 »
^So, you survived, Meaford, eh?  :)

For some reason I always had at least 30 minutes to work on my boots so I constantly buffed them using just kiwi and horsehair brush. After a while, I needed just a quick buff and it was inspection ready.

Working on boots after a wet rainy field ex is a completely different story...

Offline portcullisguy

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Re: Boot shining
« Reply #14 on: September 27, 2002, 19:38:00 »
Meaford?  Must not have meant me, I haven‘t been yet.  Still a PTE(R).

One thing I forgot to mention is the boot sole.  Lots of people forget this important part.  It‘s not very often you see the boot sole, but it is a sign of a complete and thorough polishing job if you dab and brush some polish between the heel and ball of the foot on the sole...right in that arch.  Don‘t polish the tread, you‘ll leave marks all over the floor.
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Offline ~RoKo~

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Re: Boot shining
« Reply #15 on: September 27, 2002, 20:55:00 »
Quote
Don‘t polish the tread, you‘ll leave marks all over the floor.
Oh, we learnt this the hard way on our course! One little trick is to wash off the bottom of the boot with water and a brush, then use hair spray on the bottom of the boot. It works pretty well. (Conversly, you can use that ‘polish in a bottle‘ stuff. I‘ve seen it used)

Offline kaspacanada

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Polishing the Oxfords
« Reply #16 on: March 18, 2004, 13:58:00 »
I have an officers mess dinner tomorrow night, and have recieved my two issued pairs of officers dress shoes this morning.  They are brand new, and seriously, I can get my old combat boots shinier than the pair of these that I am working on.  How shiny should these shoes be and any tips on what to use here?
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Offline combat_medic

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Re: How Shiny is Enough?
« Reply #17 on: March 18, 2004, 14:09:00 »
Kaspa: The oxfords (I‘m assuming that‘s what they are) should shine like mirrors by the time you‘re done with them, but the process takes a while.

First off, don‘t brush shine them like you would a pair of combat boots, they need to be cloth shone. Get a kiwi cloth, a little bit of water in the lid of a polish tin, and some plain black polish. Rub the polish on with the cloth in little circles until you have an even coat. Then, with a clean part of cloth, a dab of water, and an index finger, polish it off again in little circles. Repeat about 20 times until they start shining.

One little cheater trick for a top coat (once you have a lot of layers going on, and you‘re about to leave for the dinner), get a package of that liquid polish, and put in on in a very thin layer. It flakes off quickly, but for a short period of time with little movement it will look nice. Worked like a charm on my inspections for PLQ.
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Offline Garry

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Re: How Shiny is Enough?
« Reply #18 on: March 18, 2004, 14:54:00 »
I always wear Cowboy boots.

Then again, I take Tradition seriously.  

There are "some" perks to having a "Cavalry " mess kit.  :)

Offline Gunnar

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Re: How Shiny is Enough?
« Reply #19 on: March 18, 2004, 15:27:00 »
Once you have a decent polish on them, you should be able to breath on them and see a fine mist start to form.  When your shoes are almost shiny enough, when you add a tiny bit of polish and make the tiny circles, it should smear in a cloudy kind of way...keep at the little circles and all of a sudden you‘re looking at SHINY.

In bright light, you should be able to see your reflection in the toes.  If your feet are constructed in such a way that the toe cap bends when you walk, that part of the shoe will flake.  There is little you can do about it.  Try to get shoes that fit well, and that should help.
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kosstro

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Re: How Shiny is Enough?
« Reply #20 on: March 18, 2004, 15:40:00 »
kaspa, I was in the same situation and i think i can help.

First, add base layers to the shoes by putting on polish and buffing it off as you would normal combat boots. Let the polish dry at least a few minutes before buffing.  After at least five coats of that, you can start shining.

Get a cloth, wrap it around two fingers(it goes faster this way) fill the lid of the tin with as cold of water as possible.  Wet the cloth, and then get a good amount of polish on it. If it is rubbing, not sliding on the shoe, you do not have enough polish.  Begin shining the shoe by moving your fingers around in tiny circles. The polish will go cloudy at first, and eventually go shiny.  If this does not happen, you need more water, or trying breathing on the shoe, and polishing that moisture in.  When the shoe is pretty shiny, and the clouds are almost gone, breathe on it again and continue polishing until the clouds are gone.

Unfortunately, this process takes months, so you‘re pretty much screwed for tomorrow night.  Hopefully you‘re in a highland regiment, and the spats will cover your shoes.If not, join a highland regiment.

And by the way-your shoes are good to go when you can hold up your watch and see by the reflection what time it is.

Offline combat_medic

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Re: How Shiny is Enough?
« Reply #21 on: March 18, 2004, 16:22:00 »
kosstro: For an officer‘s mess dinner, the appropriate dress would be mess kit. This does not involve the wearing of spats, and the trews would cover most of the shoe.
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Offline brin11

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Re: How Shiny is Enough?
« Reply #22 on: March 18, 2004, 16:41:00 »
Kaspa,

Since you‘ve just been issued your shoes it will be understandable that your shoes will not be very shiny.  Don‘t do anything drastic to them for tomorrow night and have them ruined for later.  Work on them properly but as much as you can between now and then, you will have made an effort which is usually acceptable.  Make sure you continue your work on them after though as the next time they may not be as understanding.
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Offline Eowyn

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Re: How Shiny is Enough?
« Reply #23 on: March 18, 2004, 17:49:00 »
Combat Medic

Having been in a Highland unit, spats are worn with DEU, as mess kit, if the officer doesn‘t have the mess kit.  Trews are a particular form of tartan pants and would only cover the shoes like normal pants.
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tmbluesbflat

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Re: How Shiny is Enough?
« Reply #24 on: March 24, 2004, 00:39:00 »
They are shiney enough when they look like an Eagles *** in a Power Dive RSM Mick Austen PPCLI depot 1962