Author Topic: Boot cleaning / polishing / care of  (Read 467511 times)

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Offline Michael Dorosh

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Re: How Shiny is Enough?
« Reply #25 on: March 24, 2004, 15:12:00 »
Quote
Originally posted by combat_medic:
[qb] kosstro: For an officer‘s mess dinner, the appropriate dress would be mess kit. This does not involve the wearing of spats, and the trews would cover most of the shoe. [/qb]
Mess dress for brand new officers involves spats; it is the standard CF DEU worn with white shirt and black bow tie.  I thought the original poster was a new officer, I may be mistaken.  They are not expected to acquire mess kit right away.
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Offline bossi

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Re: How Shiny is Enough?
« Reply #26 on: March 24, 2004, 16:50:00 »
Not ALL highland regiments wear spats with their mess dress.
Many wear "diced hose" (similar to Lovatt hose, only they are checquered - different colours for different regiments).
And, in some highland regiments, the next lower acceptable form of dress for mess functions is #2 Blues, but again no spats (i.e. if you don‘t have mess kit yet - a.k.a. "Patrols").
In this case, spats are then worn with #1 Blues/Patrols (but that‘s a form of dress worn on at weddings, New Year‘s Day, or when you‘re an Aide-de-Camp).

Also, officers in many highland regiments wear brogues, not oxfords (brogues are similar to "wing tip" shoes, and have a gazillion tiny little holes all over them - to remove excess shoe polish from these holes, a Q-Tip with the cotton swab removed works well).
And, finally, the practice of wearing brogues or shoes under the spats sometimes comes as a result of not having spats big enough to fit over parade boots (aaaahhhh ... I can hear those lovely hob nails now ...) or else because they don‘t have diced hose and are only wearing hose tops (socks with the foot cut off - frugal, aye!) - and, yes - in some highland regiments boots are still the order of the day when you‘re wearing puttees (although it‘s a dying practice except for Remembrance Day parades, I still remember puttees and the annual drill competition).

Just thought I‘d better set the record straight, lest anybody be led astray ...
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Offline Michie

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Re: How Shiny is Enough?
« Reply #27 on: March 25, 2004, 08:15:00 »
The Canadian Forces has a standard. That standard is made so that no one can achieve it. They do that so that people keep striving for the best in their uniforms as to one day hope to achieve it. No matter how shiney your boots are, the CF thinks they can always be better.. but, you can always get away with a Kiwi cloth, polish and a widdle bita spit!
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corporal-cam

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Re: How Shiny is Enough?
« Reply #28 on: March 25, 2004, 09:15:00 »
From my cadet experience with my prade boots (assuming it‘s similar) what you first do is get a brand new kiwi cloth and wrap it around one or 2 fingers get get a large abount of polish and rub it in until there is so much polish that the cloth grabs a bit when going over the polish once this happens let it sit fromanywhere from 30 minutes to an hour. This is called the base polish and will look like crap so don‘t leave it like that! Then after 30 minutes to an hour get a new section of cloth and get it wet and put a little polish on the cloth and rub it in in circles. at first it wont look that good but after you‘ve done that a couple times it will start to look fairly good. I can take an new pair of stripped boots and make them like a mirror in about an hour... but that‘s only because I learned more about unifomrs than anything else at the last summer training.

Offline WARRANT

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Re: How Shiny is Enough?
« Reply #29 on: March 25, 2004, 16:34:00 »
Thats exactly how I would do it too!
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tmbluesbflat

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Re: How Shiny is Enough?
« Reply #30 on: March 25, 2004, 17:04:00 »
WO2 in PPCLI despot 1962 on inspection, to young recruit" good turn out soldier" moves to inspect the back of soldier and sees poorly shined back of boots "what do you say about this mess soldier"
soldier replies "leaving room for improvement, Sir!" The platoon got the weekend pass and the WO2 was absolutley out of it he was laughing so hard, I thought he would pass out.

tmbluesbflat

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Re: How Shiny is Enough?
« Reply #31 on: March 25, 2004, 17:17:00 »
Another time the depot RSM on inspecting the troops again friday looking for weekend passes, everything looks great until he inspects the rear of one recruit and sees the top of the recruits boot protruding from his puttees, (political correctness had not yet arrived) "What the **** is this at the back of your boots soldier?" "I don‘t know Sir!" RSM "What the **** do you mean,You don‘t know?"The recruit"Well Sir, you taught us that a good soldier never looks behind him, Sir! The RSM keeping a straight face, turned over the parade and made a very smart about face and left the area. But we all could hear him laughing as he marched off, passes granted!

shaunlin41

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Re: How Shiny is Enough?
« Reply #32 on: March 25, 2004, 18:12:00 »
Try your best to break them in quickly or any polish you apply will flake of in a matter of seconds.

vr

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Re: How Shiny is Enough?
« Reply #33 on: March 26, 2004, 17:21:00 »
How shiny is enough?

How long is a piece of string.

Like beauty it resides in the eye of the beholder.

Offline hoser

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Re: How Shiny is Enough?
« Reply #34 on: March 27, 2004, 01:01:00 »
I‘m pretty sure I can tell you how long the string is, so long as you give me a ruler.

Lajeunesse

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Re: How Shiny is Enough?
« Reply #35 on: March 30, 2004, 12:35:00 »
usually when the boots start to resemble mirrors,like almost everyonbe here has stated its shinny enough to pass an inspection.
The more effort you put into them the shinnier they‘ll be I guess the question would then have to be changed to how much time you can spend on your boots.

Offline Not a Sig Op

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Re: How Shiny is Enough?
« Reply #36 on: March 30, 2004, 12:51:00 »
Quote
Originally posted by Army_Chick:
[qb] The Canadian Forces has a standard. That standard is made so that no one can achieve it. They do that so that people keep striving for the best in their uniforms as to one day hope to achieve it. No matter how shiney your boots are, the CF thinks they can always be better.. but, you can always get away with a Kiwi cloth, polish and a widdle bita spit! [/qb]
There‘s no such thing as a standard that can‘t be achieved.

Offline Michael Dorosh

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Re: How Shiny is Enough?
« Reply #37 on: March 30, 2004, 13:28:00 »
Quote
Originally posted by tmbluesbflat:
[qb] WO2 in PPCLI despot 1962 on inspection, to young recruit" good turn out soldier" moves to inspect the back of soldier and sees poorly shined back of boots "what do you say about this mess soldier"
soldier replies "leaving room for improvement, Sir!" The platoon got the weekend pass and the WO2 was absolutley out of it he was laughing so hard, I thought he would pass out. [/qb]
I got my sergeant on the first inspection of our drivers course that way.  When asking me why I was wearing the Mk III combat shirt (the so-called "tuck in" style), I told him "the top candidate has to stand out, Sergeant."

I ended up finishing in the bottom third, but I at least made him laugh on the parade square.
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Offline RecceO

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Boot Polishing
« Reply #38 on: February 17, 2003, 08:47:00 »
Hi I was wondering if anyone out there has any good techniques when it comes to polishing boots. Mine right now are in a very poor state and i‘m interested in getting a nice glass like shine to them.

Offline combat_medic

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Re: Boot Polishing
« Reply #39 on: February 17, 2003, 12:44:00 »
Regular Kiwi boot polish, a Kiwi cloth and a lot of hard work. All of those "tricks" you may hear of usually don‘t work, and turn your boots to $hit. The only way that works is just elbow grease.
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Offline radiohead

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Re: Boot Polishing
« Reply #40 on: February 17, 2003, 12:48:00 »
GGHG_cadet, I would say go ask the Aircadets.  I know when I was in, teh Air Cadets always had the best boots around.  Apart from that just stay in on the weekend and work on them while your watching TV.

Offline Jarnhamar

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Re: Boot Polishing
« Reply #41 on: February 17, 2003, 16:08:00 »
For regular combat boots try liquid polish. I usually rub on a coat of Kiwi "honor guard". Takes about a minute per boot, not even.
It comes in a black bottle, pretty cheap. The shine doesn‘t last too too long, depends on how much you use your boots i guess but for one day a week inspections kinda stuff it‘s great.
Also if you want them to glow for an inspection rub on a few coats of "future floor polish". That does an amazing job but i heard if you are on inspection in the rain or whatever it will "run". Never been in that situation though. (The floor polish stuff is also pretty sticky and makes a mess if your not careful)

Another trick I make the guys in my section do is to use this kind of oil sponge from kiwi.  Just rub your boots down with the sponge and it looks like you spent hours shinning them. Works really well too when your boots are dull and you don‘t want to be singled out for looking like you didnt polish yours. Costs like 2 or 3 bucks.
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Offline RecceO

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Re: Boot Polishing
« Reply #42 on: February 17, 2003, 16:50:00 »
thanks for the tips ive tried the Kiwi "Honor Guard" and  those internet trick and after using those tricks they were $hit

Offline Jarnhamar

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Re: Boot Polishing
« Reply #43 on: February 17, 2003, 18:09:00 »
Huh? Are you saying they were good or bad?
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Offline gryphon664

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Re: Boot Polishing
« Reply #44 on: February 17, 2003, 21:20:00 »
This may be a repeat of the last question, but we were never taught how to polish our DEU shoes to shine like mirrors. Can someone please help? I can‘t get them past a certain stage of shineyness! Thanks
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Offline SpinDoc

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Re: Boot Polishing
« Reply #45 on: February 17, 2003, 21:35:00 »
Here‘s what I do, although there are probably better ways.

You‘ll need: Kiwi cloth, tin of Kiwi Parade Gloss (normal Kiwi would work too) but not dried -- should be creamy, hot-warm water.

1. Wet a chunk of your Kiwi cloth with hot water, wring it mostly dry.
2. Wrape the wet cloth over your finger and get a little bit of polish onto the cloth.
3. Rub the surface of shoe/boot in small circular motion until polish is gone.
4.  Repeat over entire shoe with multiple coats, repeat step 1. when cloth is dry.

Offline Marti

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Re: Boot Polishing
« Reply #46 on: February 18, 2003, 01:08:00 »
Spin Doc‘s method is probably the best, but to get boots or shoes to that glass shine requires a lot of coats of polish to get the surface really smooth and it usually takes a long time. to make things go a bit faster use two fingers instead of one.

Offline RecceO

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Re: Boot Polishing
« Reply #47 on: February 18, 2003, 13:28:00 »
I ment that the tricks didnt work and the boots looked even worse. Thanks alot for all your geat tips and tricks.

robreadman

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Re: Boot Polishing
« Reply #48 on: February 18, 2003, 15:33:00 »
Hi, I was a WO1 in the Air Cadets and thanks for the commment, we did have really shiny boots. I am kind of reluctant to give away the secret, but we‘re all on the same team  :)
This way works for cadet issue parade boots. I‘m not sure about combat boots. if they are already $hit, strip them using boiling hot water and a slightly coarse cloth. This will melt out and rub off all the contaminants.

Next, get a gob of polish and rub it all over the boot wherever you want it to shine later, in other words the whole boot! This gives you a nice "base coat" make sure your base coat is even and uniform throughout. try not to leave bumps but use a good amount of polish.

After this, wait a day or more, up to a week and then it‘s time to start polishing. Get some cold water, some say use warm water but I‘ve found that  the added heat+friction of your polishing starts to melt into the base coat creating a cloudy look, this cloud will not go away, if you get the cloud I would start at step one again. I get really cold water to apply the polish, wet the cloth and wrap it around a couple fingers, If you really want excellent detail use one finger, but that takes forever so I use two. now you dont want the cloth dripping wet so wring it out and then get only a small amount of polish on the cloth. (I find that mashing Kiwi polish into a paste makes it easier to use) Then apply the polish using a circular motion like what has already been mentioned and you‘d be amazed at how fast your boots shine up.

I always got compliments on my boots from my flight staff and it‘s really not that difficult to get them good. I don‘t buy into using rub-on polish or anything, maybe for other types of boots, but for parade boots, good old fashion kiwi cloth and black kiwi polish is the only way to go.

Cheers,

Rob.

Offline RecceO

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Re: Boot Polishing
« Reply #49 on: February 18, 2003, 16:06:00 »
Thanks alot i was wondering at any time do you buff the boots or just keep polishing.