Author Topic: British Military Current Events  (Read 1014177 times)

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Offline baboon6

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Re: British Military Current Events
« Reply #325 on: March 19, 2008, 03:26:57 »
New Gurkha Terms and Conditions of Service:

http://www.army.mod.uk/brigade_of_gurkhas/new_gtacos.htm

Things are being changed to bring them more into line with the rest of the British Army.

Offline daftandbarmy

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Re: British Military Current Events
« Reply #326 on: March 20, 2008, 13:55:47 »
Shortage of Army doctors forces MoD to hire hundreds of temporary medics at £700 a day

A shortage of Army doctors and nurses is forcing the Ministry of Defence to employ hundreds of temporary civilian medics at an average rate of more than £700 a day.


At least £8million was spent on locums last year to cover more than 12,000 shifts left short by the manning crisis.

Dozens of civilian nurses and a neurosurgeon have been deployed in war-torn Iraq and Afghanistan.


http://www.dailymail.co.uk/pages/live/articles/news/news.html?in_article_id=530372&in_page_id=1770
"The most important qualification of a soldier is fortitude under fatigue and privation. Courage is only second; hardship, poverty and want are the best school for a soldier." Napoleon

Offline geo

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Re: British Military Current Events
« Reply #327 on: March 20, 2008, 14:59:34 »
Shortage of MDs?
Heh... bin there & done that.
Many civy MDs from Canada have served in KAF
Nothing we can do - the alternative is to do without... or deal with local witch doctors err - MDs
Chimo!

Offline daftandbarmy

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Re: British Military Current Events
« Reply #328 on: March 20, 2008, 19:38:32 »
Shortage of MDs?
Heh... bin there & done that.
Many civy MDs from Canada have served in KAF
Nothing we can do - the alternative is to do without... or deal with local witch doctors err - MDs

There must be a business opportunity for a PMC (Private MEDICAL Company) who can provide access to a stable of mercenary doctors for a price. I kew a few such docs in my time who loved flitting around from conflict to conflict practising emergency medicine.
"The most important qualification of a soldier is fortitude under fatigue and privation. Courage is only second; hardship, poverty and want are the best school for a soldier." Napoleon

Offline daftandbarmy

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Re: British Military Current Events
« Reply #329 on: March 22, 2008, 18:31:12 »
Royal Anglian Regiment squaddie Katrina Hodge Miss England I can be a model


SEXY squaddie Katrina Hodge is gunning to be the next Miss England.

Lance Cpl Katrina – dubbed Combat Barbie by troops – beat thousands of entrants to reach the competition’s final stages.

And the brunette, 21 today, is using the opportunity to encourage women to enlist.

She said: “You hear girls in beauty pageants talking about wanting world peace, but I’m out there trying to achieve peace for real and I want more girls to join up.”


http://www.thesun.co.uk/sol/homepage/news/article949479.ece
"The most important qualification of a soldier is fortitude under fatigue and privation. Courage is only second; hardship, poverty and want are the best school for a soldier." Napoleon

Offline Yrys

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Re: British Military Current Events
« Reply #330 on: March 23, 2008, 20:00:39 »
Patriotic tattoo prohibits army soldier to become a cop.

http://www.thesun.co.uk/sol/homepage/news/campaigns/our_boys/article949586.ece
Louvre website

"Happiness is beneficial for the body, but it is grief that develops the powers of the mind."  Marcel Proust

Offline Red 6

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Re: British Military Current Events
« Reply #331 on: March 23, 2008, 20:56:16 »
Doesn't surprise me. Many PDs in the US are doing the same thing regarding tattoes on forearms, neck and other "visible areas." Dumb if you ask me, but nobody did.  ;)

Offline daftandbarmy

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Re: British Military Current Events
« Reply #332 on: March 24, 2008, 02:45:39 »
Marine who lost arm and both legs in Taliban blast is refused full compensation

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/pages/live/articles/news/news.html?in_article_id=542731&in_page_id=1770
"The most important qualification of a soldier is fortitude under fatigue and privation. Courage is only second; hardship, poverty and want are the best school for a soldier." Napoleon

Offline daftandbarmy

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Re: British Military Current Events
« Reply #333 on: March 24, 2008, 02:49:21 »
Drilling for oil to start in Falkland Islands

By Jasper Copping
Last Updated: 12:55am GMT 09/03/2008

The inhabitants of the Falkland Islands are preparing for a South Atlantic oil rush which they hope will make them among the richest people in the world.
 
After 10 years of frustrating delays since oil fields containing up to 60 billion barrels of "black gold" were discovered off the islands, oil companies are planning to start drilling within the next 12 months.

The move follows the conclusion of lengthy, but successful, tests by geologists and significant cash injections by two major oil companies which plan to bring rigs to the islands by as early as autumn.

The companies with licences to drill in the area met in Edinburgh on Friday to brief officials from the Falklands' government on their progress, and preparations are under way in the South Atlantic to ensure that the islands can cope with sudden wealth.
 

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml?xml=/news/2008/03/09/wfalk109.xml
"The most important qualification of a soldier is fortitude under fatigue and privation. Courage is only second; hardship, poverty and want are the best school for a soldier." Napoleon

Offline cameron

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Re: British Military Current Events
« Reply #334 on: March 24, 2008, 07:54:40 »
Drilling for oil to start in Falkland Islands

By Jasper Copping
Last Updated: 12:55am GMT 09/03/2008

The inhabitants of the Falkland Islands are preparing for a South Atlantic oil rush which they hope will make them among the richest people in the world.
 
After 10 years of frustrating delays since oil fields containing up to 60 billion barrels of "black gold" were discovered off the islands, oil companies are planning to start drilling within the next 12 months.

The move follows the conclusion of lengthy, but successful, tests by geologists and significant cash injections by two major oil companies which plan to bring rigs to the islands by as early as autumn.

The companies with licences to drill in the area met in Edinburgh on Friday to brief officials from the Falklands' government on their progress, and preparations are under way in the South Atlantic to ensure that the islands can cope with sudden wealth.
 

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml?xml=/news/2008/03/09/wfalk109.xml

You can bet the Argentines are following this very closely.  If there was one time the Brits needed to devote more resources to the defence of the Falklands, it's now.
"All men dream: but not equally.  Those who dream by night in the dusty recesses of their minds wake in the day to find that it was vanity: but the dreamers of the day are dangerous men, for they may act out their dream with open eyes, to make it possible."

Seven Pillars of Wisdom, Lawrence of Arabia

Offline Yrys

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Re: British Military Current Events
« Reply #335 on: March 25, 2008, 20:57:00 »
« Last Edit: March 25, 2008, 21:35:14 by Yrys »
Louvre website

"Happiness is beneficial for the body, but it is grief that develops the powers of the mind."  Marcel Proust

Offline daftandbarmy

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Re: British Military Current Events
« Reply #336 on: March 26, 2008, 02:39:56 »
The battle for Basra: Iraqis fight Mahdi army as British troops remain at base

Iraqi security forces battled with Shia militia in Basra yesterday in an intense conflict widely seen as a critical test of the Baghdad government's ability to control its own country.

The battle for Iraq's second city could have huge repercussions for the continuing US occupation and the legacy left by five years of British military involvement in the south.

Fifteen thousand soldiers from the Iraqi national army led the crackdown under the supervision of the prime minister, Nouri al-Maliki, against the Mahdi army, followers of the radical cleric Moqtada al-Sadr. At least 31 people were killed and 88 injured, police and hospital officials said.

The fighting also raised the spectre of a new bout of bloodletting across the Shia-dominated south and the multi-ethnic centre of the country, by unravelling a ceasefire declared by Sadr last August. Armed members of Mahdi army appeared on the streets of Baghdad for the first time in six months.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2008/mar/26/iraq.military
"The most important qualification of a soldier is fortitude under fatigue and privation. Courage is only second; hardship, poverty and want are the best school for a soldier." Napoleon

Offline daftandbarmy

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Re: British Military Current Events
« Reply #337 on: March 26, 2008, 13:02:57 »
'Refusal is a slap in the face' 
By Angus Crawford
BBC News 


A soldier from the Commonwealth who served more than four years in the British Army, including two tours in Iraq, has been told he can't become a British citizen because he applied on the wrong date.

 
 
Rogers Jean-Baptiste was born in St Lucia. He made his application this January, but was told by the Home Office that because on the same date five years earlier he was outside the UK he didn't qualify.
 

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/7313541.stm
"The most important qualification of a soldier is fortitude under fatigue and privation. Courage is only second; hardship, poverty and want are the best school for a soldier." Napoleon

Offline geo

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Re: British Military Current Events
« Reply #338 on: March 26, 2008, 13:47:59 »
Here is someone who wishes his turn to stand on a soapbox and speak his mind......

http://www.dotsub.com/films/moredemands/index.php?autostart=true&language_setting=en_1618


Chimo!

Offline daftandbarmy

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Re: British Military Current Events
« Reply #339 on: March 26, 2008, 22:50:58 »
MoD should ditch key arms projects, say MPs

Pressures on the defence budget are so great that ministers should consider sacrificing one of its most prestigious projects - the £4bn replacement of two aircraft carriers - rather than simply delaying or cutting back planned new weapons systems, a powerful scrutiny committee will say today.

In a report critical of how the government procures new weapons, the cross-party Commons defence committee will challenge it to explain "what roles the two future carriers will perform ... and what capabilities these ships will give us that could not be provided in other ways".

Two carriers, the largest ships ever built for the navy, are due to be completed in 2014 and 2016 at an estimated cost of £3.9bn. Delays are likely to increase the costs while separate delays in the US Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) programme mean the first carrier will make do with ageing British Harriers, the committee notes.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/politics/2008/mar/27/defence.military


"The most important qualification of a soldier is fortitude under fatigue and privation. Courage is only second; hardship, poverty and want are the best school for a soldier." Napoleon

Offline daftandbarmy

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Re: British Military Current Events
« Reply #340 on: March 26, 2008, 22:55:04 »
SAS soldier killed in Iraq gunfight

An SAS soldier was killed in Iraq in a gunfight early yesterday during a covert operation in the Baghdad area, sources said last night.

The Ministry of Defence, which does not comment officially on the activities of the UK's special forces, said only that a British soldier was shot and killed in Iraq. A spokesman said his next of kin had been informed.

The MoD said the family had asked that no further information be released. His death brings the total number of British military casualties in Iraq since the invasion in March 2003 to 176.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2008/mar/27/military.iraq

"The most important qualification of a soldier is fortitude under fatigue and privation. Courage is only second; hardship, poverty and want are the best school for a soldier." Napoleon

Offline daftandbarmy

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Re: British Military Current Events
« Reply #341 on: March 27, 2008, 00:46:33 »
Army says farewell to UK's 'bugger-off' airbag drone
Droid suicide flotilla wiped itself out in 7 years

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2008/03/26/phoenix_says_goodbye/

The UK Ministry of Defence (MoD) has announced the formal retirement of its infamous "Phoenix" reconnaissance drone, leaving at least a two-year wait before its partly-British replacement is planned to come into service. Until then, the British forces will use hastily-imported overseas equipment bought under emergency procedures.
"We had many years of great operational experience with Phoenix and it has served us really well," said Lt Col Nick McRobb, commanding officer of the British Army's drone-aircraft regiment, quoted by the MoD press office.

 
Psst - George! Why aren't we having a flypast, then?

Colonel McRobb's assessment of the Phoenix is rather at odds with that of other soldiers, who nicknamed the unfortunate machine the "bugger-off" drone for its tendency not to return from missions. Its troubled 1990s development history is now used as a how-not-to-do-it example in university systems engineering courses.

The Phoenix was especially renowned for its Rube Goldberg/Heath Robinson recovery method, in which it descended to land hanging upside down beneath a parachute. This was in order to safeguard sensitive sensor gear in a belly pod. Unfortunately, the upside-down landings were found to wreck the fuselage, so exasperated engineers finally added a dorsal airbag to cushion the shock.

Unsurprisingly, the Phoenix suffered a fearful attrition rate when it finally went operational in 1999. More than 70 aircraft went missing, were shot down or got written off in crashes in Iraq alone between 2003 and 2006, and more were lost or wrecked in the Balkans before that. Still others have had to be cannibalised for spares, and all this within a total fleet of only 198.

It seems likely that last week's out-of-service parade, in which surviving Phoenixes moved past assembled troops on their launcher lorries, may have featured most of the visually intact Phoenix airframes still in existence. One can't help noticing that there apparently wasn't any flypast, either, which is quite usual when military aircraft go out of service - so in fact there may not be any serviceable Phoenixes left at all.

It's difficult, then, to go along with Col McRobb and agree that the Phoenix gave "great operational experience". Some might also quibble with his assertion that it was in service for "many years", as in fact the MoD says that the final operational flight took place nearly two years ago in Iraq - meaning that the Phoenix served for just seven years, during which a fleet almost 200 strong effectively wiped itself out. Each "bugger-off" reportedly cost the taxpayers no less than £1.5m.

Now Col McRobb's regiment will operate with a mixture of imported kit hastily purchased under "urgent operational requirement" rules - Hermes 450s imported from Israel, and miniature battery powered hand-launched "Desert Hawk" jobs from the States. The RAF has also purchased three bigger, more capable Predator-B/Reaper drones from the US, but plans to get more are rumoured to be on hold.

All this gear is effective and comparatively cheap, and there is absolutely no doubt that the hard-pressed UK forces urgently need more of it. Ideally they would just buy more, relatively cheaply from existing suppliers.

Unfortunately, MoD cash is normally required to do more than just buy equipment for men and women fighting and dying at the government's orders. It is also expected to provide jobs and votes here in the UK. Thus, the £800m drone budget will now be spent entirely on the Watchkeeper project, in which UK factories will be set up to produce a Hermes 450-type airframe copied from Israel and integrate French firm Thales' radar onto it.

The resulting Watchkeeper aircraft will be a bit better than the current Hermes 450s - but they will cost much the same as much bigger, hugely more capable Reapers. And they won't arrive until at least 2010. And they will be dependent on parts and support from both Israel and France, so they don't offer Blighty an independent capability.

Sure, deals of this type generate jobs in the UK. But it almost always turns out that each job costs the taxpayer (at least) a million pounds over and above the cost of buying existing gear - and then, in ten years' time or less, a similar demand is made in order to preserve the said job. The jobs actually turn out to be, in effect, a tremendously expensive dole scheme.

And meanwhile, British troops - so badly paid that they are often not from Blighty at all nowadays - wait years for their gear until it can be made in the UK, paying hugely inflated prices for the privilege. And then, often enough - considering the good old British made Phoenix - it isn't worth either the wait or the price. ®



"The most important qualification of a soldier is fortitude under fatigue and privation. Courage is only second; hardship, poverty and want are the best school for a soldier." Napoleon

Offline geo

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Re: British Military Current Events
« Reply #342 on: March 27, 2008, 08:59:55 »
Fuinny thing that, the UKs Phoenix and Canada's Sperwer have a lot in common....
The parachute landing system paired to airbags is exactly the same as what we currently use.

However, given the offensive capabilities of the Predator, I don't expect Canada will ever stoop to purchase this drone from our US neighbours.
Chimo!

Offline cameron

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Re: British Military Current Events
« Reply #343 on: March 29, 2008, 17:32:05 »
Teachers snub to troops

http://www.thesun.co.uk/sol/homepage/news/campaigns/forces/article958598.ece

A Canadian hero welcome (shame Britain's treatments of ours troops)

http://www.thesun.co.uk/sol/homepage/news/article957382.ece

(18 pictures)

Bakri slur on boxer Amir

I just looked at the slideshow pictures in the Sun story "A Canadian hero welcome", and I must say I got a lump in my throat, they are truly moving.  As for the "Teachers snub to troops" all I will say as a former schoolteacher myself is that those teachers are a disgrace to the noble profession.

http://www.thesun.co.uk/sol/homepage/news/article956706.ece
"All men dream: but not equally.  Those who dream by night in the dusty recesses of their minds wake in the day to find that it was vanity: but the dreamers of the day are dangerous men, for they may act out their dream with open eyes, to make it possible."

Seven Pillars of Wisdom, Lawrence of Arabia

Offline daftandbarmy

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Re: British Military Current Events
« Reply #344 on: March 30, 2008, 20:06:33 »
Courage and heroism under fire.  Outstanding.
 
 
 
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/world/asia/article3646243.ece
 
From The Sunday Times
March 30, 2008
Lance Corporal Matt Croucher hurls himself onto Taliban grenade
One man’s heroism saved the lives of his patrol – and left him with nothing more than a bloody nose
Lance Corporal Matt Croucher
Stephen Grey in Helmand
 
A Royal Marine in southern Afghanistan threw himself onto an exploding grenade to save the lives of his patrol.
 
Miraculously, Lance Corporal Matt Croucher, a marine reservist from Birmingham, survived the blast with little injury when his rucksack and body armour took the force of the blast. He is expected to receive one of the highest awards for gallantry.
 
The story of his courage emerged last week in interviews with marines occupying a forward operating base near Sangin in Helmand province. They are preparing to leave after serving for six months at the centre of some of the fiercest fighting in Afghanistan. The outpost, Forward Operating Base Inkerman, is better known to troops as "FOB Incoming".
 
Croucher's action occurred just before dawn on February 9, as the reconnaissance troop from 40 Commando, operating to the south of Sangin, was searching a compound it suspected was being used for making bombs to attack British and Afghan troops.
Multimedia
 
Walking in the darkness among a group of four men, Croucher stepped into a tripwire that pulled the pin from a boobytrap grenade. His patrol commander, Corporal Adam Lesley, remembered Croucher's shout of: "Grenade!"
 
As others dived for cover, Croucher, 24, did something nobody expected. He lay down on the grenade to smother the blast. Lesley got on the ground, another man got behind a wall, but the last member of the patrol was still standing in the open when the grenade went off.
 
"My reaction was, 'My God this can't be real'," said Lesley. "Croucher had simply lain back and used his day sack to blunt the force of the explosion. You would expect nine out of 10 people to die in that situation."
 
Then they waited. "It felt like a lifetime," said Lesley. When the grenade went off it blew Croucher's rucksack more than 30ft and sent a burning radio battery fizzing into the air. As the noise died down, one of the patrol, Marine Scott Easter, was standing "just completely frozen" and untouched. Croucher was in deep shock but, apart from a bloody nose, had few injuries. "He had shrapnel in his helmet, in the plate of his body armour, but he was basically okay," said Lesley. "His day sack had taken the blast."
 
Croucher told the News of the World: "All I could hear was a loud ringing and the faint sound of people shouting 'are you ok? Are you ok?'
 
"Then I felt one of the lads giving me a top to toe check. My head was ringing. Blood was streaming from my nose. It took 30 seconds before I realised I was definitely not dead," he added.
 
The troop commander, Captain Dan Venables, said they decided to exploit the incident. "I made the decision that after the grenade went off, the Taliban would come to see what had happened. So we lay in wait and ambushed them."
 
Croucher's actions prompted his colleagues to pass a citation to the Commanding Officer of 40 Commando, Lieutenant Colonel Stuart Birrell, to recommend him for the Victoria Cross.
 
"It's a pretty unusual thing but the lads put me forward for the VC themselves.
 
"It's entirely out of my hands. But if it was to happen it would be a massive honour, not just for me but for the regiment and all my comrades,” he told the News of the World.
 
Yesterday, fellow marines were reluctant to play up the incident. "Such has been the ferocity of the fight 40 Commando has endured these past few months, this has been one remarkable incident among many," said one senior Royal Marines officer as they prepared to hand over to the Parachute Regiment. Their experience highlights the danger faced every week by many of the 7,700 troops in Afghanistan. Inkerman, an exposed hilltop compound, is a heavily contested position.
 
Since the marines arrived last October it has been attacked 57 times, including twice while I was there with the photographer Nick Cornish. Inkerman stands on the edge of what the military call the "green zone", a fertile strip of land along the Helmand River which, in front of the base and for nearly 20 miles north, is almost entirely in Taliban hands.
 
The garrison's role is to draw enemy fire from Sangin three miles to the south — a job similar to what Sergeant James Liepa, 30, did for his men in January when his patrol was ambushed. Liepa and seven fellow marines were pinned down behind a bank of mud by Taliban fighters they could not spot. Liepa tried to get a bearing on where the gunfire was coming from but as the rounds cracked around him, he realised it was impossible.
 
"They were literally trying to shoot my hand off," recalled Liepa. "I thought, 'If we stay here more than a couple of minutes we'll be dead'." Liepa told his comrades he was going to stand up and make himself the prime target. "That meant I was going to jump and run so all firing points would shoot at me," he said. The idea was to give everyone else a chance to spot where the Taliban were firing from — and return fire. Liepa, from Barnstaple, Devon, gave his men a 30-second countdown. Then he got up and the bullets flew.
 
Liepa's bravery turned the battle around. "There are a few people who would do something like that, but not many," said Corporal George Alford, 27, a marine who was there. "The truth is that someone had to do it or we'd have been killed."
 
Liepa says he had no choice. "For me to tell someone else to stand up and run while everyone shoots at them just felt like sending someone to their death, so I decided to do it myself."
 
On his second step Liepa fell face first. As he did so, arcs of fire from at least three Taliban machineguns met above his head. "I lay there half a second and thought, 'They know where I am, I'm dead,' but I got up and ran again and the bullets were everywhere, bar me, which was nice." His men drove off the Taliban and all got out alive.
 
Interviewing the marines of Alpha Company, 40 Commando, it became clear the toll has been heavy: several serious injuries and the death of a much-respected corporal, Damian "Dee" Mulvihill, 32.
 
We met them after stepping into the choking, hot dust from a helicopter ramp. Their home was a sandy, square compound of flapping canvas and thick walls made from wire and cloth cages packed with earth.
 
The marines sleep under the thin protection of parachute silk or roofs made from a patchwork of ponchos. Urinals are metal tubes hammered into the sand.
 
We did not have to wait long to witness the dangers. The day after our arrival, Inkerman's mortars were booming away at Taliban men in front of the base. Apache helicopters strafed ditches where the enemy was hiding.
 
Two days later we joined an Alpha Company patrol as it headed north in Viking armoured vehicles. The plan was to head into the desert and then sweep back into the "green zone" for a surprise attack. The Taliban were waiting in ambush.
 
The first clue of imminent combat was the sight of men, women and children fleeing their homes as the marines approached a ridge-line. "The Taliban are actually pretty concerned to get civilians out of the way," said Captain Ian Preece, second-in-command of Alpha. Then, with marine snipers and reconnaissance troops dismounted, the enemy opened fire with a volley of machinegun fire and rocket-propelled grenades. One struck an old fort on the hilltop where Liepa and a team of snipers were hiding.
 
The response was ferocious. Machinegunners on the Vikings opened fire, a French jet dropped a 500lb bomb on a compound and artillery back at Inkerman fired a barrage of shells against a tree line.
 
Next came the Apaches came circling overhead. The Taliban, who hate these helicopters, lay low, challenging the British to descend from the ridge. With their ambush so well prepared, Major Adrian Morley, Alpha's commander, declined the offer.
 
Twice more the Taliban struck — a bang to the right and a cloud of black smoke announced another close by. Then a rocket came whizzing over the ridge, landing behind us. The Apaches struck back with rockets.
 
However, for the marines at Inkerman, named after a British victory in the Crimean war, the most ferocious fighting took place five months ago. Alpha company calls November 9 their "9/11". Returning from a foot patrol in the green zone, the marines were ambushed in open ground and ran for the shelter of a compound. It was a trap. Both the entrance and the roof were raked by enemy fire. Four men were wounded and had to be evacuated by helicopter and the troops were able to withdraw only under a barrage of artillery and mortar fire.
 
Marine Gary Ogden, 26, a company medic, remembers lying behind a mud bank when he felt a tug on his leg. "I glanced back at the compound entrance," he said, "and I could see a figure screaming 'medic'." The man was Captain Paul Britton, the officer who co-ordinated artillery, mortars, Apaches and air strikes. "I remember rounds hitting the doorway all around him and wondering why they weren't hitting him," said Ogden.
 
With the air filled with the crack and thump of bullets, Ogden charged into the compound. Propped up on the floor was Corporal Simon "Sy" Greening, with a bullet wound to his chest. Ogden patched him up, but soon there was another cry of "medic".
 
This time, an RPG had blasted two men from the compound roof. One, Marine David Fletcher, had serious wounds to his legs. Ogden stabilised Fletcher, but as he did so, he noticed bullets that had come straight through the open door were still thumping into walls around him.
 
"As I was chatting to Sy, an RPG streaked over and arched down into the compound and hit the wall I was facing. Then I saw a body drop."
 
It was a signaller, Corporal Dave Watts, with a shrapnel wound. Meanwhile, a huddle appeared around another man. Britton had at last been hit, but despite the shrapnel lodged in his arm, the captain opted to stay and fight rather than be evacuated.
 
While the group was holed up, a troop of Alpha company was dashing south through the cornfields and ditches, trying to secure a landing zone for a rescue helicopter. With the entrance under constant fire, a "mousehole" was blown in the compound wall to make an escape route. For a long time, a twin-bladed Chinook rescue helicopter had been circling round waiting to land.
 
"The [helicopter] was holding off because it just looked at a storm of rounds going in and out," said Ogden. "Mortars were going down and artillery was smashing the place. The Apaches were waiting to come in."
 
As the Chinook finally dived down to land, its two Apache escorts swerved ahead and rocketed the tree lines. "It was like a scene from Apocalypse Now," said one marine watching from Inkerman.
 
For the Chinook, the continuing gun battle made it a hot landing zone, a helicopter pilot's worst fear.
 
"The Apaches asked if the landing zone was secure," another marine recalled. "We said it was as secure as it could be."
 
On the ground with four casualties to evacuate, Ogden recalls a doctor running down the ramp of the helicopter and having to be dragged into cover as bullets streaked by. Without the daring rescue, said Ogden, the two most seriously injured, Greening and Fletcher, who are now recovering well in Britain, might not be alive.
 
When the helicopters pulled away, the troops began to pull back to the base, covered to the rear by a barrage of mortar and artillery fire. When they returned, it was dark.
 
The next day, Ogden and other medics were back in action as the Taliban began a month of ferocious attacks with enemy fighters coming within 100 yards of the base. Three men were injured, blown backwards and raked with shrapnel as a rocket struck the front of their firing position on the base's walls. November and December saw more than 33 attacks on the base. Commanders believed the Taliban were concentrating attacks on bases such as Inkerman to divert the British from their manoeuvres to take the Taliban stronghold of Musa Qala further north.
 
Since then attacks have been lighter, but new threats have emerged, such as a spree of mines laid nearby. One killed Mulvihill, from near Plymouth, who was 32 and engaged to be married, when it detonated under his Viking. A few days later a marine sniper team exacted vengeance. Operating at night, the group lay in wait in old Soviet hilltop trenches, and fired a missile at two men laying mines. The marines, now preparing to leave, realise it will be difficult to adjust to home. Among the hardest things to explain to their families will be what made them act as they did.
 
Liepa said: "All that happens is you look left and right and think, 'We're dead unless you do something now'," he said. "You just do what your brain tells you is the right thing."
"The most important qualification of a soldier is fortitude under fatigue and privation. Courage is only second; hardship, poverty and want are the best school for a soldier." Napoleon

Offline geo

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Re: British Military Current Events
« Reply #345 on: March 30, 2008, 21:16:15 »
Hua!
Tales of daring doo of the highest order.  Yowze!!!

With little or no regard to personal safety, »LCpl Crowther threw himself on an ennemy grenade and .... lived to tell the tale!

THIS is what Soldiers are made of.  Well done!

CHIMO!
Chimo!

Offline daftandbarmy

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Re: British Military Current Events
« Reply #346 on: March 30, 2008, 21:27:06 »
Hua!
Tales of daring doo of the highest order.  Yowze!!!

With little or no regard to personal safety, »LCpl Crowther threw himself on an ennemy grenade and .... lived to tell the tale!

THIS is what Soldiers are made of.  Well done!

CHIMO!

+1 to that. He won't have to buy a round for awhile at the Royal Marine School of Dancing in Plymouth
"The most important qualification of a soldier is fortitude under fatigue and privation. Courage is only second; hardship, poverty and want are the best school for a soldier." Napoleon

Offline geo

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Re: British Military Current Events
« Reply #347 on: March 30, 2008, 21:32:50 »
Ayup

If this lad isn't a candidate for a medal of valour..... a really important and visible medal of valour, I am a monkey's uncle.

Soldier on Royal Marine, :salute:

CHIMO!
Chimo!

Offline daftandbarmy

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Re: British Military Current Events
« Reply #348 on: March 30, 2008, 22:12:21 »
Too bad that all the VCs are pre-assigned to the Army  ;)
"The most important qualification of a soldier is fortitude under fatigue and privation. Courage is only second; hardship, poverty and want are the best school for a soldier." Napoleon

Offline daftandbarmy

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Re: British Military Current Events
« Reply #349 on: March 30, 2008, 22:31:54 »
They likely have a special lining at the back for the RAF Regiment...

Could you see this ever happening in Canada? No, I thought not - and it's too darned bad!



RAF's birthday bikini

The Royal Air Force is celebrating its 90th anniversary - with a "show-stopping" diamante-encrusted bikini.

The swimwear is part of the RAF Collection's Spring range, reports the Daily Telegraph.

The new range coincides with the RAF's 90th anniversary on April 1. The RAF hopes sales of the bikini, which features diamante roundels, will soar.

A spokeswoman for the RAF Collection said: "The collection will enable the next generation to own a piece of one of the United Kingdom's most prestigious brands."

In RAF colours, the bikini top retails at £20, while the bottoms are £15. Sizes are available in 8 to 18.


http://www.ananova.com/news/story/sm_2786237.html?menu=news.quirkies
"The most important qualification of a soldier is fortitude under fatigue and privation. Courage is only second; hardship, poverty and want are the best school for a soldier." Napoleon