Author Topic: USAF Woes  (Read 103536 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Online tomahawk6

  • Army.ca Fixture
  • *****
  • 87,825
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 8,645
Re: USAF Woes
« Reply #275 on: May 31, 2017, 22:20:35 »
 The Air Force is bringing back into service 8 C5M's over 4 years.I suspect that these numbers could increase as needed.

http://www.popularmechanics.com/military/aviation/a26716/air-force-reactivating-c-5-galaxy/

The U.S. Air Force is bringing back C-5M Super Galaxy transports recently mothballed due to budget cuts. The gigantic planes, sent to an early retirement in a cost-cutting move, are being brought back as money flows back into the service's coffers. The C-5M's range, greater than any other air transport, is a key factor.

The C-5 Galaxy was originally introduced in the late 1960s as a strategic airlifter able to cross entire oceans without refueling. The C-5 is the largest airlifter built by the United States, 65 feet high and with a wingspan of 247 feet. It can carry a maximum of 135 tons of cargo. With a combat load of sixty tons of cargo, the C-5M can fly from Dover Air Force Base in Delaware to Incirlik Air Force Base, Turkey nonstop without refueling. According to the Air Force, it can fly 7,000 miles without cargo.

Offline MarkOttawa

  • Army.ca Fixture
  • *****
  • 56,380
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 5,664
  • Two birthdays
    • The 3Ds Blog
Re: USAF Woes
« Reply #276 on: August 02, 2017, 16:47:40 »
Dealing with pilot probs:

Quote
Air Force Gets Creative to Tackle Pilot Shortage

The Air Force's pilot shortage has leaders worried not only about filling gaps in the immediate future, but also how the military and civilian airlines may suffer without fine-tuned aviators in decades to come.

As a result, Air Mobility Command at Scott Air Force Base, Illinois, if given permission, may start a small group tryout for pilots testing a new program in which aviators stay at their home-duty stations longer, thus increasing their longevity and likelihood to stay in service, the head of the command told Military.com in an exclusive interview.

"Should we go with a 'fly-only' track?" Gen. Carlton Everhart II said in an interview Wednesday.

Everhart said he envisions something like this: "You stay with me for 20 years, and I let you fly. You … could maybe [make] lieutenant colonel, but you may not make higher than that.

"Then, [we] allow you to stay at your home station for three to four years instead of two to three, so you can get some longevity," he continued. "Then, it's not just [flying airlift cargo or tanker planes]. You could go to [Air Education and Training Command] and help out there for three to four years to help bring on new pilots.

"To sweeten the deal, as you come into your career, maybe in the last four years, we allow you on a 'dream sheet' to put your top three choices, try to get you moved to there so you can establish your family and where you want to retire," he said.

Everhart said the 'fly-only' effort would still encompass wing, squadron and group duties and deployments but -- bottom line -- "it's longevity."

The same aviator retention bonuses would also apply, he said...
http://www.military.com/daily-news/2017/07/30/air-force-gets-creative-to-tackle-pilot-shortage.html

Mark
Ottawa
Ça explique, mais ça n'excuse pas.

Online SeaKingTacco

  • Army.ca Veteran
  • *****
  • 109,945
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 4,482
  • Door Gunnery- The Sport of Kings!
Re: USAF Woes
« Reply #277 on: August 02, 2017, 16:59:07 »
What? Actually employing expensively trained pilots in the cockpit?

Madness.

That is no way to run a military bureaucracy....

Offline MarkOttawa

  • Army.ca Fixture
  • *****
  • 56,380
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 5,664
  • Two birthdays
    • The 3Ds Blog
Re: USAF Woes
« Reply #278 on: August 26, 2017, 12:52:30 »
More on pilot probs:

Quote
Airlines Step Up Hiring So Air Force Boosts Retention Pay

Eager to stem the flow of Air Force pilots chasing bigger paychecks and cushier gigs with America’s airlines, Air Force Secretary Heather Wilson announced today [Aug. 25] the service is increasing what used to be called flight pay for the first time since 1999.

US airlines hired 4,000 pilots last year, many of them former military pilots. Wilson said officers will now get $1,000 a month, up from $850 and enlisted will get $600 up from $400 a month. It looks as if the pay is going up because the Air Force just isn’t retaining as many pilots as it had expected to. The service, Wilson said. will also try to recruit up to 25 former military pilots for one-year contracts to serve on critical rated staff positions. Many staff jobs require rated pilots to understand the technicalities they deal with.

Wilson also named Brig. Gen. Michael G. Koscheski as head of the Aircrew Crisis Task Force. Assigning a general officer is an indication, along with the task force’s name, that the Air Force is beginning to get really worried about pilot retention and that the effort needs clearer focus.

Intriguingly, Wilson said the service’s attempts to improve drone pilot retention were on track and that no new measures were needed...
http://breakingdefense.com/2017/08/airlines-step-up-hiring-so-air-force-boosts-retention-pay/

Mark
Ottawa
Ça explique, mais ça n'excuse pas.

Offline MarkOttawa

  • Army.ca Fixture
  • *****
  • 56,380
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 5,664
  • Two birthdays
    • The 3Ds Blog
Re: USAF Woes
« Reply #279 on: September 22, 2017, 12:45:06 »
RCAF?

Quote
Pilot Shortage May Force U.S. Air Force To Outsource Training
Facing shortage, U.S. Air Force weighs contracting out training

Faced with a critical shortfall, particularly in the fighter community, the U.S. Air Force may be forced to take drastic steps to produce new pilots.

The service is short 1,500 pilots, including 1,000 fighter pilots, says Brig. Gen. Michael Koscheski, director of the new Aircrew Crisis Task Force established to tackle the problem. That gap will continue to grow with an increased demand for experienced combat aviators in regions such as the Middle East and Asia.

“In Desert Storm, we had 134 combat-coded fighter squadrons. Today, we have 55,” Koscheski said on Sept. 18 at the Air Force Association’s annual air, space and cyber conference. “We have gotten smaller, and the mission has at least stayed the same, if not grown.”

Although the Air Force is stepping up recruitment efforts to combat the shortage, recruitment is not the core issue. In fact, there are more men and women who want to fly than the service has capacity to train, says Lt. Gen. Darryl Roberson, commander of Air Education and Training Command.

The real challenge is pilot production, absorption and retention, officials say. In simple terms, due to a combination of snowballing factors—budget cuts, longer deployments and a recent spike in commercial airline hiring, to name a few—the Air Force is challenged both to train enough new aviators to keep up with demand from the field and to keep experienced pilots from leaving...
http://aviationweek.com/defense/pilot-shortage-may-force-us-air-force-outsource-training

Mark
Ottawa
Ça explique, mais ça n'excuse pas.

Offline dapaterson

  • Army.ca Subscriber
  • Army.ca Legend
  • *
  • 373,400
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 14,880
Re: USAF Woes
« Reply #280 on: September 22, 2017, 13:05:20 »
RCAF can't train its own in a timely manner.  I am beginning to think that running pilot training is too complex an undertaking for pilots to manage...
This posting made in accordance with the Charter of Rights and Freedoms, section 2(b):
Everyone has the following fundamental freedoms: freedom of thought, belief, opinion and expression, including freedom of the press and other media of communication
http://laws.justice.gc.ca/en/charter/1.html

Offline Eye In The Sky

  • Army.ca Fixture
  • *****
  • 180,700
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 7,558
    • VP INTERNATIONAL
Re: USAF Woes
« Reply #281 on: September 22, 2017, 14:59:02 »
Training is hard to do when the budget isn't fat enough to do it the way it should be done.  This isn't limited to Pilots in the RCAF.
"...Pilot, Radar...turn right, heading...3-6-5..."

Offline rnkelly

  • Jr. Member
  • ***
  • 2,490
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 95
Re: USAF Woes
« Reply #282 on: September 22, 2017, 15:15:58 »
RCAF can't train its own in a timely manner.  I am beginning to think that running pilot training is too complex an undertaking for pilots to manage...

What trade do you suggest?

Training output is fine, retention on the other hand...

Offline dapaterson

  • Army.ca Subscriber
  • Army.ca Legend
  • *
  • 373,400
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 14,880
Re: USAF Woes
« Reply #283 on: September 22, 2017, 15:52:38 »
Pilots are too expensive to train to employ significantly outside the cockpit.  So, employ them as instructors.  But to run the training system, you'd probably be best suited to have the majority of the staff as civilians: less expensive to employ, generally, longer tenures in positions and thus can take the long view.

Planning and coordinating training is not a task worth employing pilots on.  And given the shortages of TES vs TEE, and oversize BTL currently in place for Pilot, it's clear that letting inmates run the asylum pilots run the training system hasn't worked.
This posting made in accordance with the Charter of Rights and Freedoms, section 2(b):
Everyone has the following fundamental freedoms: freedom of thought, belief, opinion and expression, including freedom of the press and other media of communication
http://laws.justice.gc.ca/en/charter/1.html

Offline Eye In The Sky

  • Army.ca Fixture
  • *****
  • 180,700
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 7,558
    • VP INTERNATIONAL
Re: USAF Woes
« Reply #284 on: September 22, 2017, 16:19:50 »
Pilots are too expensive to train to employ significantly outside the cockpit.  So, employ them as instructors.  But to run the training system, you'd probably be best suited to have the majority of the staff as civilians: less expensive to employ, generally, longer tenures in positions and thus can take the long view.

Planning and coordinating training is not a task worth employing pilots on.  And given the shortages of TES vs TEE, and oversize BTL currently in place for Pilot, it's clear that letting inmates run the asylum pilots run the training system hasn't worked.

We could say the same thing for....MARS officers, or...Combat Arms types.  Would MARS or Combat Arms types want to be trained by civies? 

Unless the pilots leaving the service become the civies that do the teaching.  Not sure the CFFTSs are located in the most desireable living locations.
"...Pilot, Radar...turn right, heading...3-6-5..."

Offline rnkelly

  • Jr. Member
  • ***
  • 2,490
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 95
Re: USAF Woes
« Reply #285 on: September 22, 2017, 22:57:43 »
Pilots are too expensive to train to employ significantly outside the cockpit.  So, employ them as instructors.  But to run the training system, you'd probably be best suited to have the majority of the staff as civilians: less expensive to employ, generally, longer tenures in positions and thus can take the long view.

Planning and coordinating training is not a task worth employing pilots on.  And given the shortages of TES vs TEE, and oversize BTL currently in place for Pilot, it's clear that letting inmates run the asylum pilots run the training system hasn't worked.

Like many occupations, pilots are required in command and admin positions.  That's just the cost of doing business in the military.  I wouldn't want to see pilots get any less operationally driven than they are right now during training.  I think we've maxed out the benefits of civilian contractors with the likes of Bombardier, CAE, Allied wings, Kelowna Flightcraft, Canadian helicopters, Top Aces, Discovery Air Defense services, Calian etc.

Offline dapaterson

  • Army.ca Subscriber
  • Army.ca Legend
  • *
  • 373,400
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 14,880
Re: USAF Woes
« Reply #286 on: September 22, 2017, 23:17:47 »
The cost of training pilots is almost an order of magnitude greater than that for other occupations.  We therefore need a greater return on that investment; if more than half a career is spent flying desks then we're wasting millions on pilot training.

Indeed, if we push some pilots out of cubicles in YOW, YWG and YGK and back into line functions, some of those contracted functions could be brought back in house.

Ultimately, the RCAF (run by and large by pilots) has failed to keep the pilot production pipeline in good working order.  As with any bureaucracy, we have an unfortunate habit of reinforcing failure, by throwing more money at the problem, instead of cutting our losses and starting anew (Cough Phoenix cough).  Fixing RCAF pilot training also means fixing the pilot occupational structure writ large; and therefore it won't happen - too many vested interests in preserving the status quo, warts and all.
This posting made in accordance with the Charter of Rights and Freedoms, section 2(b):
Everyone has the following fundamental freedoms: freedom of thought, belief, opinion and expression, including freedom of the press and other media of communication
http://laws.justice.gc.ca/en/charter/1.html

Offline rnkelly

  • Jr. Member
  • ***
  • 2,490
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 95
Re: USAF Woes
« Reply #287 on: September 23, 2017, 00:49:08 »
I agree with a lot of what you're saying but we can't have 100% of our TES in cockpits either.  You need pilots in the HQ's just like you need Infantry and MARS otherwise the tail starts wagging the dog.  As far as numbers in HQ's I've never been but I've heard some fat could be cut.  Again, I think that training pilots to wings standard isn't the main problem, we define that as being OFP which I find amusing since you are no where near deployable yet.

If a pilot retires after 25 yrs as a Captain or Major the vast majority of their career should be spent flying for sure.  I don't think it's unique to pilots though, it's probably better than most trades though.  If you have a room full of infantry captains you would be hard pressed to find a platoon commander.  When I'm being charitable I like to think the CAF has a method to their madness (re; frequent postings) and is trying to give a member a wide variety of experiences and exposure so that when the day comes to deploy they are versatile and could serve a number of different roles/purposes competently, sometimes on the same deployment. 

I agree that a lot of things within the CAF need to be relooked at though.  When I arrived on Sqn, we only had a quarter of the helicopters we were suppose to have according to doctrine.  The PYs for the sqn, wing etc were based on the doctrine number though.  We had too many pilots for too few hours so you were spending the first half of a training flight shaking off the rust, not ideal.  When I took ATOC, I assumed wrongly that the Armoured Regiment had said number of tanks- I was laughed out of the mess. 

Return on investment is a can of worms, we're only here to offer a capability and may never be used at all.  Everyone can release after their initial VIE and if they decide to (which is their right) we aren't getting much bang for our buck (in most cases).  So the only way to get a return on investment is to retain members for longer than their VIE and the only way to do that is to keep them happy (read- not completely miserable).  We try to be the employer of choice and have great remuneration packages but somehow still have retention and recruiting problems.  When is Human Resources Officer going to be a thing, with actual training and stuff.


Offline MarkOttawa

  • Army.ca Fixture
  • *****
  • 56,380
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 5,664
  • Two birthdays
    • The 3Ds Blog
Re: USAF Woes
« Reply #288 on: October 20, 2017, 19:15:40 »
Cf. RCAF?

Quote
Air Force could recall as many as 1,000 retired pilots to address serious shortage

President Trump signed an executive order Friday allowing the Air Force to recall as many as 1,000 retired pilots to active duty to address a shortage in combat fliers, the White House and Pentagon announced.

By law, only 25 retired officers can be brought back to serve in any one branch. Trump's order removes those caps by expanding a state of national emergency declared by President George W. Bush after 9/11, signaling what could be a significant escalation in the 16-year-old global war on terror.

"We anticipate that the Secretary of Defense will delegate the authority to the Secretary of the Air Force to recall up to 1,000 retired pilots for up to three years," Navy Cdr. Gary Ross, a Pentagon spokesman, said in a statement.

But the executive order itself is not specific to the Air Force, and could conceivably be used in the future to call up more officers and in other branches.

More: Army is accepting more low-quality recruits, giving waivers for marijuana to hit targets

The Air Force needs about 1,500 pilots more than it has. Bonus programs and other incentives have not made up the shortfall.

The Air Force has been at the forefront of the Pentagon's battle against the Islamic State, flying most of the combat sorties in Iraq and Syria since 2014...
https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/2017/10/20/air-force-recall-many-1-000-retired-pilots-address-serious-shortage/785344001/

Mark
Ottawa
Ça explique, mais ça n'excuse pas.

Online tomahawk6

  • Army.ca Fixture
  • *****
  • 87,825
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 8,645
Re: USAF Woes
« Reply #289 on: October 21, 2017, 18:29:21 »

Online Rifleman62

    Retired.

  • Army.ca Subscriber
  • Army.ca Veteran
  • *
  • 72,510
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 2,464
Re: USAF Woes
« Reply #290 on: October 21, 2017, 21:08:35 »
T6 may miss the meaning. Hellyer Cpl's???

Never Congratulate Yourself In Victory, Nor Blame Your Horses In Defeat - Old Cossack Expression

Online tomahawk6

  • Army.ca Fixture
  • *****
  • 87,825
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 8,645
Re: USAF Woes
« Reply #291 on: October 22, 2017, 00:01:09 »

Offline dapaterson

  • Army.ca Subscriber
  • Army.ca Legend
  • *
  • 373,400
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 14,880
Re: USAF Woes
« Reply #292 on: October 22, 2017, 00:18:25 »
Quote
President Trump signed an executive order Friday allowing the Air Force to recall as many as 1,000 retired pilots to active duty to address a shortage in combat fliers, the White House and Pentagon announced.

Hmm...

This posting made in accordance with the Charter of Rights and Freedoms, section 2(b):
Everyone has the following fundamental freedoms: freedom of thought, belief, opinion and expression, including freedom of the press and other media of communication
http://laws.justice.gc.ca/en/charter/1.html

Offline MarkOttawa

  • Army.ca Fixture
  • *****
  • 56,380
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 5,664
  • Two birthdays
    • The 3Ds Blog
Re: USAF Woes
« Reply #293 on: October 22, 2017, 17:13:11 »
Meanwhile:

Quote
Air Force: No plans to recall retired pilots to fix shortage
https://www.airforcetimes.com/news/your-air-force/2017/10/22/air-force-no-plans-to-recall-retired-pilots-to-fix-shortage/

Mark
Ottawa
Ça explique, mais ça n'excuse pas.

Online tomahawk6

  • Army.ca Fixture
  • *****
  • 87,825
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 8,645
Re: USAF Woes
« Reply #294 on: October 22, 2017, 17:50:27 »
Meanwhile:

Mark
Ottawa

I dont see how they can avoid doing that.They dont have to fly. Retired pilots can fill staffs and training roles to free up deskbound pilots.

Offline SupersonicMax

    is back home.

  • Mentor
  • Army.ca Veteran
  • *
  • 71,270
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 2,590
Re: USAF Woes
« Reply #295 on: October 22, 2017, 21:25:15 »
Preclude to a Korean war?

Online tomahawk6

  • Army.ca Fixture
  • *****
  • 87,825
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 8,645
Re: USAF Woes
« Reply #296 on: October 22, 2017, 22:48:06 »
Not for North Korea.How many planes do you need to take out a military frozen in time ? In the first 24 hours their navy and air force would cease to exist. SAM defenses would be destroyed AAA would be a problem. Lil Kim would probably be a casualty in the ensuing power struggle .Kim goes and a deal might be struck.

Offline SupersonicMax

    is back home.

  • Mentor
  • Army.ca Veteran
  • *
  • 71,270
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 2,590
Re: USAF Woes
« Reply #297 on: October 23, 2017, 00:28:34 »
You'd need a lot to neutralize the threat to Seoul (long range arty) and the ICMB threat.  Far more than you have 5th Gen (which you'd need)  North Korea is probably the hardest nut to crack in terms of military strategy.

Online tomahawk6

  • Army.ca Fixture
  • *****
  • 87,825
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 8,645
Re: USAF Woes
« Reply #298 on: October 23, 2017, 08:49:37 »
You'd need a lot to neutralize the threat to Seoul (long range arty) and the ICMB threat.  Far more than you have 5th Gen (which you'd need)  North Korea is probably the hardest nut to crack in terms of military strategy.

Helicopter gunships and C-130 gunships may be more effective against targets dug into the side of a hill or mountain.

Offline YZT580

  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • 16,810
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 510
Re: USAF Woes
« Reply #299 on: October 23, 2017, 10:44:06 »
Helicopter gunships and C-130 gunships may be more effective against targets dug into the side of a hill or mountain.
Not to mention the antiquated relic of the cold war: the A10