Author Topic: Life After the Army Experiences  (Read 33823 times)

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Offline shooked1

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Life After the Army Experiences
« on: January 03, 2010, 01:01:03 »
I have always thought about going in tho the  military (nothing in the civilian world really interest me)  but one of my biggest concerns is what for some reason i could no longer be in the military would i be at a dead end because i only have a highschool diploma ???
Recruiting Centre: Toronto
Regular/ Reserve: Regular
Officer/NCM: NCM
Trade Choice 1: Infantry
Trade Choice 2:
Trade Choice 3:
Applied: May 5, 2014
First contact: May 8, 2014
CFAT: June 2, 2014
Medical: October 8, 2014
Interview: October 21, 2014
Merit Listed: January 2015
Position offered: February 18, 2015
Enrollment/swearing in: February 20, 2015
BMQ: February 23, 2015

Offline standingdown

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Re: life after the military
« Reply #1 on: January 03, 2010, 01:10:38 »
Who says when you get out that you will only have a HS diploma?

There are a wide array of opportunities in the CF that will enable you to improve your education or gain technical skills.

Just some food for thought. I would suggest going to a recruiting centre to learn more.

Offline Brasidas

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Re: life after the military
« Reply #2 on: January 03, 2010, 01:20:08 »
I have always thought about going in tho the  military (nothing in the civilian world really interest me)  but one of my biggest concerns is what for some reason i could no longer be in the military would i be at a dead end because i only have a highschool diploma ???

You're familiar with the fact that everybody in the army isn't an infanteer and everybody in the air force isn't a fighter pilot, right?

There are plenty of trades that the military trains people in. You decide which ones you're interested in, with criteria that can include things like how marketable your skills may be in civilian employment as well as how interesting you find the trade. The CF in turn lets you know which ones it's interested in letting you do.

Talk to folks, serving and released, about different trades you might be interested in.

Offline SupersonicMax

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Re: life after the military
« Reply #3 on: January 03, 2010, 02:08:34 »
You're familiar with the fact that everybody in the army isn't an infanteer and everybody in the air force isn't a fighter pilot, right?


Are you saying a fighter pilot cannot easily transfer his skills in the civy world?

Offline Brasidas

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Re: life after the military
« Reply #4 on: January 03, 2010, 02:25:55 »
Are you saying a fighter pilot cannot easily transfer his skills in the civy world?

I'm saying that not everyone in the military is combat arms, and that the military produces tradesmen.

I'm expecting even somebody who doesn't of think of non-infantry or armoured crewmen army trades will at least be smart enough to know that an ex-air force pilot is going to be able to find a job outside the military.

Offline arwin

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Re: life after the military
« Reply #5 on: January 03, 2010, 06:23:15 »
just curious.
for example, an infantry soldier (NCM) gets released after the set period of service, that applicant has only a high school diploma, so what kind of civilian career can that individual start right away? besides becoming a police officer. a well paid career.

Offline CallOfDuty

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Re: life after the military
« Reply #6 on: January 03, 2010, 08:17:23 »
  Heres the link to the forces web site http://www.forces.ca/html/infantrysoldier_reg_en.aspx

  At the bottom of the page it reads " RELATED CIVILIAN OCCUPATIONS
The Infantry Soldier occupation is uniquely military and has no civilian equivalent; however, the experience Infantry Soldiers gain in the use and maintenance of vehicles, communications equipment, weapons and tools of all types is highly applicable to many civilian jobs. More important, an experienced Infantry Soldier has the self-confidence, integrity, loyalty and trustworthiness that good employers want. Infantry leadership skills are also highly desirable to civilian employers."
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Offline Carcharodon Carcharias

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Re: life after the military
« Reply #7 on: January 03, 2010, 10:13:47 »
After I left of the Australian Regular Army one year ago,  I went directly into a civilian engineering firm, was hired on as an armourer ( all was prearranged so I literally went from green to blue from a Friday to the Monday - there was a bit of culture shock), getting paid more then I was a soldier, and to add more cream, I went into the Reserve system here, getting tax free pay at $182.04 for 6 hrs work. Easy money. Reserves get 70 days per year with extensions to 100 days, and can get further extentions at 150 and up to 200 days if needed with the correct justification. Soo add that on, say at least at 70 days, plus tax free field pay, and all the other perks.

As a Defence Contractor, I am still in the military family, and get to do my job, working on M242 chain guns, .50 QCB and the rest of the catalogued family of small arms, I just go home at the end of the day, missing all the BS politics.

The Corps of RAEME has vehicle mechanics, electricians (from everthing like appliances to dental eqpt, armourers, recovery mechanics), to sum if it is an eqpt that needs repaired, RAEME fixes it. So there is plenty of opportunities in the civilain world for former RAEME pers, who are not only trained in their specific trade, but also have the basic soldier and leadership skills which are overly admired on the outside.  There are many other skills too which are civilian accredited, and well sought after like OHS, and management.

Soldiers are generally well disciplined, punctual and professional, and create a sharp image thru dress and bearing. 

So after some good TI, leaving at the rank of SGT (E7), there is plenty of prosperous opportunitiy for former soldiers not only in RAEME but other trades.


Regards,

OWDU
« Last Edit: January 03, 2010, 10:17:50 by Overwatch Downunder »
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Offline ModlrMike

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Re: life after the military
« Reply #8 on: January 03, 2010, 11:28:44 »
I have always thought about going in tho the  military (nothing in the civilian world really interest me)  but one of my biggest concerns is what for some reason i could no longer be in the military would i be at a dead end because i only have a highschool diploma ???

Here's a tip I used to give my soldiers:

"The first day of retirement planning is the last day of your QL3."

It makes no sense to wait 20 or 25 years and then lament that you only have a high school diploma. That being said, your military experience can carry a lot of weight, but we're in an era where education is often more important to employers.

In short, what I'm saying is that it's up to you to seek the academic upgrading you will require to enhance your retirement options. There's plenty of time to complete it... provided you start early.
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Offline Gizmo 421

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Re: life after the military
« Reply #9 on: January 03, 2010, 12:01:37 »
OWDU
Does your company have any positions for a soon to be retired Canadian Forces person?
7 yrs EME Wpns Tech Land
6 yrs EME Fire Control Systems (now Electro/Optical)
7 yrs Aerospace Telecommunications Information Systems Tech
;)
I still have so much to learn.

Offline Carcharodon Carcharias

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Re: life after the military
« Reply #10 on: January 03, 2010, 16:52:54 »
EME cousin,

Your quals would indeed be in demand, but accreditation on an Australian standard thru ALTC in Bandiana Vic would be necessary, especially small arms, one needs the Aust FAMT course, even I had to do that when I first come over 15 yrs ago. BHP, Minimi, MAG 58, .50 are common, but Steyr is in a class of its own, hence the FAMT (Fitter Armament Maintenance Techniques) course, covers this along with other weapons including M203PI. You can get RPL on the other wpns such as the 84mm, and 81 mortar. M4/M16 FOW too

You would also need a visa to work here, and thatis not easy, very costly etc andf there may be restrictions too if you are over 40, best to check this out thru searching immigration on the net.

I must get bck to my Coors lite.

Cheers,

OWDU
"You've never lived until you've almost died; as for our freedom, for those of us who have fought for it, life has a flavour the protected will never know." - Anonymous

Offline shooked1

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Re: life after the military
« Reply #11 on: January 03, 2010, 19:44:10 »
thanks for your input
 ;D
Recruiting Centre: Toronto
Regular/ Reserve: Regular
Officer/NCM: NCM
Trade Choice 1: Infantry
Trade Choice 2:
Trade Choice 3:
Applied: May 5, 2014
First contact: May 8, 2014
CFAT: June 2, 2014
Medical: October 8, 2014
Interview: October 21, 2014
Merit Listed: January 2015
Position offered: February 18, 2015
Enrollment/swearing in: February 20, 2015
BMQ: February 23, 2015

Offline armychick2009

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Re: life after the military
« Reply #12 on: January 04, 2010, 21:11:21 »
You could get a job at AECL (atomic energy canada limited, nuclear reactor) near Petawawa... be one of the guys/gals in the gray suits walking around with guns :)

They get paid well, trust me!

Offline Bruce Monkhouse

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Re: life after the military
« Reply #13 on: January 04, 2010, 21:18:13 »
Corrections likes ya also.......
IF YOU REALLY ENJOY THIS SITE AND WISH TO CONTINUE,THEN PLEASE WIGGLE UP TO THE BAR AND BUY A SUBSCRIPTION OR SOME SWAG FROM THE MILNET.CA STORE OR IF YOU WISH TO ADVERTISE PLEASE SEND MIKE SOME DETAILS.

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Offline Ex-Dragoon

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Re: life after the military
« Reply #14 on: January 05, 2010, 17:59:23 »
Scan seminars are held a couple of times a year to help you transition from you getting out and your life beyond. You would be advised to sign up before you release.
I will leave your flesh on the mountains and fill the valleys with your carcasses. I will water the land with what flows from you, and the river beds shall be filled with your blood. When I snuff you out I will cover the heavens and all the stars will darken. Ezekiel 32:5-7
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Offline ModlrMike

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Re: life after the military
« Reply #15 on: January 05, 2010, 20:08:27 »
SCAN is seriously flawed, and as currently constituted, a waste of effort. Here's my view...

SCAN should consist of at least three phases:

1. the young "soldier" who moves from BE to IE gets a seminar and gets introduced to the second career planning cycle. The sessions can include such things as skills and education upgrading, for example;

2. between 10 and 15 years service, a follow-up session is attended. This should allow for members to check their progress, and if necessary, get back on track while there's still time to do so; and

3. SCAN in a format similar to the current one that focuses on transition to civilian life.


I can't overstate my philosophy that retirement planning starts at the beginning of a career, not at the end.
WARNING: The consumption of alcohol may create the illusion that you are tougher,smarter, faster and better looking than most people.
Every normal man must be tempted, at times, to spit upon his hands, hoist the black flag, and begin slitting throats. (H.L. Mencken 1919)
Zero tolerance is the politics of the lazy. All it requires is that you do nothing and ban everything.

Offline shooked1

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Re: life after the military
« Reply #16 on: January 06, 2010, 15:36:42 »
that is the main reason i started this thread. I am thinking a about going in the miitary but I began to think hat if god fobid anything happened to mw what type of options would i have or would i just be at a dead end
Recruiting Centre: Toronto
Regular/ Reserve: Regular
Officer/NCM: NCM
Trade Choice 1: Infantry
Trade Choice 2:
Trade Choice 3:
Applied: May 5, 2014
First contact: May 8, 2014
CFAT: June 2, 2014
Medical: October 8, 2014
Interview: October 21, 2014
Merit Listed: January 2015
Position offered: February 18, 2015
Enrollment/swearing in: February 20, 2015
BMQ: February 23, 2015

Offline armychick2009

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Re: life after the military
« Reply #17 on: January 07, 2010, 02:16:19 »
Shooked, you're only at a dead end if you choose to be at a dead end. Any trade/career with any workplace is the same way.  For example, I'm a graphic designer by trade... I've worked in the private sector, public sector, education sector, and hope to at some point in the very near soon future, use these skills in the army somewhere. I've had these jobs over a period of 12 years and meanwhile, operated my own business at the same time. I imagine any trade you learn in the forces you can find some kind of application in out-of-army life... most of your success or failure will be determined by you... don't worry about it too much, so much can change in 1 year, five years, twenty years or thirty... don't be naive and stop thinking about it, just don't let it determine whether you join the forces or not. Maybe find another trade that you think would give you more likely opportunities in the future. But personally? I'd go with the trade that makes you happy now....  (just my opinion for what it's worth)

Offline Rigger7710(F)

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Re: life after the military
« Reply #18 on: January 07, 2010, 07:59:04 »
I have always thought about going in tho the  military (nothing in the civilian world really interest me)  but one of my biggest concerns is what for some reason i could no longer be in the military would i be at a dead end because i only have a highschool diploma ???
Like you, I wanted nothing else than being in the military, so I joined with only a high school diploma. I have never continued my education but that never stopped job offers from civilian companies. I have always turned them down and now I have retired after 32 years of regular force. I am still turning down job offers because now, I want nothing else than full retirement.   The bottom line is, ex-military people are desired in many civilian outfits because of the discipline (and other qualities gained from the CF) we have received in our training and that can't be found in non ex-military.

Offline CallOfDuty

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Re: life after the military
« Reply #19 on: January 07, 2010, 09:25:32 »
  Hey there Rigger.  I see you were AVN.  Are you getting job offers in the same line of work?
    Heres a new question guys.  What trades in the military would you say is easiest to transfer over to Civillian DND jobs?  The one I see the most is MSE ops retiring and either going MDO drivers or CE groundskeepers.

   What about RMS clerks?  Do they roll over into CR3,4,5 jobs easily? I suppose med lab types would be easily transferred.
"I bought a box of animal crackers and it said do not eat if seal is broken.  I opened it, and sure enough...................."

Offline armychick2009

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Re: life after the military
« Reply #20 on: January 07, 2010, 09:34:24 »
I know med techs that have their civilian paramedic course can become paramedics but some of the older ones who joined before it became standard, don't have this training. However, my ex has been offered work overseas in undisclosed locations (close to the non-existent camp) by companies there. Locally? I'm not sure... he'd need to up his training in order to be considered. (He's one of those older ones that don't yet have that course).

My brother is a supply tech. He's been in for two years... he's already had a standing job offer for an airline manufacturing company for the supply department.

The trade I am going into... (hopefully!)... which I don't want to really announce on here yet as it's a small trade, has excellent job opportunities afterwards in a wide variety of fields. I was already in civilian life doing many of those jobs so I know that my position will be easily transferable. 

Offline mover1

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Re: life after the military
« Reply #21 on: January 07, 2010, 09:57:12 »
Go to the recruiter ask for Traffic Tech. MOS ID # 0170.
It has, and can, and will give you tons of skills that transfrom easily on to civvie st.
working with materials handling equipment, knowlege of Canada Customs procedures, you get taught the Sabre Airline Hosting system. (flight booking software) Shipping and receiving, Dangerous goods handling and receiving. Plus if your keen enough you can go flying as a loadmaster on the Herc's, C-17s, Airbuses and whatever else the Gov't is going to buy in a few years time.
Lots of travel lots of work and loads of fun.

Offline GD

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Re: life after the military
« Reply #22 on: January 07, 2010, 10:05:37 »
Aerospace Telecommunication & Information Systems Technician- The Recruiter Will give you a list of Colleges that are accepted to the CF and you can apply to the College of your Choice, then put in application to the CF.

CF pays your college and a Salary, and you get the Experience that many companies look for.


Same applies for the following:

Aerospace Telecommunication & Information Systems Technician
Biomedical Electronics Technologist
Cook
Dental Technician
Electronic-Optronic Technician - Land
Land Communication and Information Systems Technician
Marine Engineering Mechanic
Medical Laboratory Technologist
Medical Radiation Technologist
Naval Electronics Technician (Communications)
Naval Electronics Technician (Radar)
Naval Electronics Technician (Sonar)
Naval Weapons Technician
Vehicle Technician


The end result is you get an education, and you do your job. Should you decide to leave the CF after 5 yeas, 10 years or 25 years you have this education.

Offline old fart

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Re: life after the military
« Reply #23 on: January 07, 2010, 11:32:16 »
SCAN is seriously flawed, and as currently constituted, a waste of effort. Here's my view...

SCAN should consist of at least three phases:

1. the young "soldier" who moves from BE to IE gets a seminar and gets introduced to the second career planning cycle. The sessions can include such things as skills and education upgrading, for example;

2. between 10 and 15 years service, a follow-up session is attended. This should allow for members to check their progress, and if necessary, get back on track while there's still time to do so; and

3. SCAN in a format similar to the current one that focuses on transition to civilian life.


I can't overstate my philosophy that retirement planning starts at the beginning of a career, not at the end.


Apart from a couple of presentation with regard to pension payment rules (if you are to get one), and some taxation aspects (RRSP transfer of severance pay) SCAN is a waste of taxpayers money. The only folks who derive any benefit are the crew that take the show on the road, both Canada and overseas.

To be even more blunt, the CF offers no real transition for many (particularly Combat Arms folks) as they leave the CF for pastures new. While not SCAN related, the Education Reimbursement (ER) Program is aimed improvising your usefulness to the CF not your employability in Civvi street. "ER provides financial assistance to Regular Force officers and NCMs who, through part-time study, wish to upgrade their educational or professional qualifications in the interests of the CF.

Even the Skill Enhancement Program (essentially upgrade your qualifications from your military MOS that have a civilian equivalent); try that on as Combat Engineer or infantryman etc.
What would I like to see as a service leaver......A real career transition program, one that provides benefits tied to length of service. 

For instance, and as a minimum, less than ten years sit in on the briefings to get a pitch from Scotia Bank, resume help etc, basically as SCAN is now less the pension related presentations.

With more than than 10 YOS and definitely at 20/25 YOS, graduated and increased transition benefits.  Essentially a real post CF re-training and job placement program.  This is totally lacking now.
Until our service members have such a benefit to prepare them for the civilian world the CF will continue to get off extremely light for the years of service contributed by the member.

I saw SCAN for what it was years ago, nothing but a self licking ice cream for those that take it on the road no matter how well meaning the individuals who present are.

The program is folks a pile of....well you know.  I think our service leavers deserve far more than what is offered now. 

If we had such a program, I firmly believe it would add to retention particularly of folks who serve a lifetime in the hard combat arms with no civilian equivalent employment, knowing that you can stay in those occupations for life as many do, and have a chance of getting gainful employment on exit from the CF.

Old fart...
"Soldiering on"

Offline Journeyman

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Re: life after the military
« Reply #24 on: January 07, 2010, 12:34:06 »
The CF recruiting website lists civilian equivalences of all trades. Even those unique trades without direct civilian equivalencies, such as Infantry, note,
Quote
The Infantry Soldier occupation is uniquely military and has no civilian equivalent; however, the experience Infantry Soldiers gain in the use and maintenance of vehicles, communications equipment, weapons and tools of all types is highly applicable to many civilian jobs. More important,* an experienced Infantry Soldier has the self-confidence, integrity, loyalty and trustworthiness that good employers want. Infantry leadership skills are also highly desirable to civilian employers.

As for the comment:
I firmly believe it [an effective second-career program] would add to retention
...are you serious?
You believe that helping people get out of the CF completely will somehow, miraculously aid in their staying in? 

Just look at the heartache and hand-wrining in this thread concerning people transferring from RegF to Reserve...within the same military! With that thread's arguments in mind, actively helping the troops take their skills completely away from the military will miraculously convince them to stay in is some leap of logic. :stars:


I do agree whole-heartedly, however, that the SCAN program is a cash-wasting piece of crap.
I also feel that if you're not able to market yourself, given the training and experience the CF already provides its personnel, no amount of SCAN PowerPoints are likely to help you. Sensitivity isn't my strong suit.



* I'm sure they mean "more importantly." Despite joining the CF with a Gr 10 education, those 'benefits from the training and experience offered throughout my career' have learned me some stuff.  ;) 
There’s nothing more maddening than debating someone who doesn’t know history, doesn’t read books, and frames their myopia as virtue. The level of unapologetic conjecture I’ve encountered lately isn’t just frustrating, it’s retrogressive, unprecedented, and absolutely terrifying.
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