Author Topic: Life of a Canadian Forces Medical technician  (Read 88900 times)

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Offline Sierrafire

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Life of a Canadian Forces Medical technician
« on: February 16, 2010, 20:14:17 »
Hello all,

I have searched the best my computer skills allowed me and still need some questions answered(or guided to the page where they are answered!!)

So here it goes. say you have finished your BMQ and SQ and have returned from The JIBC and posted to a base for your on the job training...lets say CFB Petawawa.   How does a typical newbie med tech spend their days? What hours do they work?  Do they respond to emergencys on base and prepare the patients for transport to hopsital by a municiple service if need be?  I would love to be further educated on what the trade does on base..  Thanks for your patience and replys.

Offline Rider Pride

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Re: Life of a Canadian Forces Medical technician
« Reply #1 on: February 17, 2010, 00:54:06 »
How does a typical newbie med tech spend their days? What hours do they work?  Do they respond to emergencys on base and prepare the patients for transport to hopsital by a municiple service if need be?  I would love to be further educated on what the trade does on base..  Thanks for your patience and replys.

They do nothing of the sort. On base, you may work in a CDU doing sick parade and patient care, and coverages of ranges and excercises. You will not be working as a "paramedic" (how insulting to real Medics) unless there is some sort of aid to civil power mission, which is the exception than the rule. Med Techs do thier best work out with the troops, usually overseas, on the seas or in the field. Most days are spent training, prepping supplys and getting ready to go places and do things.

Not every day is filled with adventure; but the ones that are, you will be glad you paid attention during the boring times.

more from others.
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Offline medicineman

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Re: Life of a Canadian Forces Medical technician
« Reply #2 on: February 17, 2010, 15:37:17 »
What SFB said - not alot of running around in ambulances these days.  Maybe in Gagetown once in awhile out in the Trg area, otherwise it's mainly in garrison care, training, maintenance or exercises.

If you want cool ambualnce calls, you'd have to wait until you're doing MCSP on car or do some moonlighting (if you're actually around long enough to).

MM
MM

Remember the basics of Medicine - "Pink is GOOD, Blue is BAD, Air goes in AND out, Blood Goes Round and Round"

I may sound like a pessimist, but I am a realist.

Offline Radar

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Re: Life of a Canadian Forces Medical technician
« Reply #3 on: June 04, 2010, 05:14:05 »
Would this be generally the same at an Air Base? What would the differences be in the Navy Element?

Offline PMedMoe

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Re: Life of a Canadian Forces Medical technician
« Reply #4 on: June 04, 2010, 06:46:41 »
What would the differences be in the Navy Element?

Off the top of my head......you might be on a ship.   ;) 
"A good traveler has no fixed plans, and is not intent on arriving".
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Offline Rider Pride

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Re: Life of a Canadian Forces Medical technician
« Reply #5 on: June 04, 2010, 08:41:45 »
preface by saying "never been on ship"

On Ship, your the junior working one on one with a PA. As a medic you will responsible to the PA for everything. Literally everything, med records, med supply, initial screening of patients, coordinating appointments.

It would not be a stretch to say that it may not be the same, as all the army bases have moved to a CDU concept (which the air force bases have used for years) have have become heavily reliant on civilians to take care of most of the administrative duties.
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Offline Bzzliteyr

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Re: Life of a Canadian Forces Medical technician
« Reply #6 on: June 04, 2010, 09:03:41 »
I am actually gonna jump in and ask (out of curiosity and to help the OP) what is a CDU?

Not everyone knows all the acronyms we (you) use day to day.. we need to remember to use "plain talk" when answering basic questions!
Adsum

UNPROFOR, CPSM, Canadian Forces Commander Land Force Command Commendation (Bosnia 1993), Canadian Decoration, General Campaign Star - ISAF

Offline PMedMoe

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Re: Life of a Canadian Forces Medical technician
« Reply #7 on: June 04, 2010, 09:05:24 »
Care Delivery Unit
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Offline mariomike

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Re: Life of a Canadian Forces Medical technician
« Reply #8 on: June 04, 2010, 09:52:33 »
Get on the bus. Take a ride with us.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X2lSGnPl-ww

Offline Rider Pride

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Re: Life of a Canadian Forces Medical technician
« Reply #9 on: June 05, 2010, 01:36:25 »
Its what our Reg F medical system uses as a health care unit to provide first line support. Its a family practitioners office/walk in clinic with 1-3 MOs, 1-3 NP/PA's a couple nurses, 2-5 medics and civilians who take care of a group of about 1500 "clients" otherwise known as soldiers.
"Return with your shield, or upon it."

Offline Radar

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Re: Life of a Canadian Forces Medical technician
« Reply #10 on: June 08, 2010, 05:41:50 »
preface by saying "never been on ship"

On Ship, your the junior working one on one with a PA. As a medic you will responsible to the PA for everything. Literally everything, med records, med supply, initial screening of patients, coordinating appointments.

It would not be a stretch to say that it may not be the same, as all the army bases have moved to a CDU concept (which the air force bases have used for years) have have become heavily reliant on civilians to take care of most of the administrative duties.


Thanks SFB, I appreciate the information, as well as your post regarding Med Techs in Afghanistan. It was quite informative. I am currently working on my fitness and then I plan on applying for Medic.

Offline Rider Pride

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Re: Life of a Canadian Forces Medical technician
« Reply #11 on: June 14, 2010, 20:57:05 »
Thanks,

And you really should apply now...you have everyday of the rest of your life to work on your fitness.

 ;)
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Offline DiverMedic

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Re: Life of a Canadian Forces Medical technician
« Reply #12 on: August 05, 2010, 22:13:30 »
I would just like to say that it doesn't matter what element you pick, you can end up anywhere.   I am Navy on an Army base.   I know Navy/Air that have never been posted to their respected element bases.

There is more to being a medic than working CDUs on the army bases.  CFH is the warehouse for medical kit, it is mainly medic run.  FdAmbs mainly support the troops, but there is also kit maintenance and vehicle maintenance that has to be done there as well.  Navy bases seem to offer more medical work, but you can also spend long periods of time away when you are posted to a ship.  But that is similar everywhere.  In the last 3 yrs, I have actually worked at my unit for about 10 months and been on my base for about 19 months.

Don't want to scare you off, just be aware of what you are getting into. 

Offline Simian Turner

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Re: Life of a Canadian Forces Medical technician
« Reply #13 on: August 06, 2010, 07:32:58 »
I would just like to say that it doesn't matter what element you pick, you can end up anywhere.   I am Navy on an Army base.   I know Navy/Air that have never been posted to their respected element bases.

There is more to being a medic than working CDUs on the army bases.  CFH is the warehouse for medical kit, it is mainly medic run.  FdAmbs mainly support the troops, but there is also kit maintenance and vehicle maintenance that has to be done there as well.  Navy bases seem to offer more medical work, but you can also spend long periods of time away when you are posted to a ship.  But that is similar everywhere.  In the last 3 yrs, I have actually worked at my unit for about 10 months and been on my base for about 19 months.

Don't want to scare you off, just be aware of what you are getting into.

Let's be clearer...

1 Canadian Field Hospital (1 Cdn Fd Hosp) is a $40+ million multi-configuration, field-deployable, Role 3 hospital, not a CFH (Canadian Forces Hospital) as it does not provide health services in garrison, nor is it a warehouse for medical equipment.  1 Cdn Fd Hosp has Biomedical Equipment Technicians, Preventive Medical Technician and a large number of Medical Technicians in Treatment and Headquarters Companies, as well as clerks and technicians from at least four other Branches in Headquarters and Services Companies with variety of Health Services and Logistics Officers who command the unit and is not "mainly medic run".

Central Medical Equipment Depot (CMED) is a medical equipment warehouse which has a few Medical Technicians, Health Care Administrators, Biomedical Equipment Technicians and Pharmacists on its nominal roll, as well as civilian technicians, administrative staff and warehouse workers.
« Last Edit: August 06, 2010, 07:41:49 by Simian Turner »
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Offline TimBit

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Re: Life of a Canadian Forces Medical technician
« Reply #14 on: August 06, 2010, 10:04:24 »
Its what our Reg F medical system uses as a health care unit to provide first line support. Its a family practitioners office/walk in clinic with 1-3 MOs, 1-3 NP/PA's a couple nurses, 2-5 medics and civilians who take care of a group of about 1500 "clients" otherwise known as soldiers.

And in most cases I would say, works like a charm. Never had such a short wait time in a hospital in my life.

Offline Simian Turner

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Re: Life of a Canadian Forces Medical technician
« Reply #15 on: August 06, 2010, 10:07:16 »
And in most cases I would say, works like a charm. Never had such a short wait time in a hospital in my life.

And by exception, if you are posted to Ottawa you could wait 3 months for an appointment!
The grand essentials of happiness: something to do, something to love, something to hope for.  Allan K. Chalmers

Offline cmac232

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med tech questions
« Reply #16 on: April 20, 2011, 22:03:42 »
i am interested in becoming a med tech.
i am considering either reserves or regular force.
if i pick reserves, am i allowed to complete all the training
like bmq, then borden, then chilliwack. then return home and
continue on with my civi life and serve as a reservist.
i am single and have a dog, if i serve reg force, would i have
to get rid of my dog? would i be gone too much?

Offline medicineman

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Re: med tech questions
« Reply #17 on: April 21, 2011, 01:19:47 »
i am interested in becoming a med tech.
i am considering either reserves or regular force.
1.if i pick reserves, am i allowed to complete all the training
like bmq, then borden, then chilliwack. then return home and
continue on with my civi life and serve as a reservist.
2.i am single and have a dog, if i serve reg force, would i have
to get rid of my dog? would i be gone too much?

1.  No - BMQ would be done locally, it would be unlikely you'd go to Chilliwack, as PCP isn't the required level of training for a Res Med Tech.

2.  No - but you'd need to be able to get someone to look after them if you want to keep them.  Lots of people have good careers with pets.

Now - in accordance with rules in this forum (and if you want to go anywhere in the trade and military), use proper grammar, capitalization, sentence structure and punctuation.  That was very hard to read and when I was reading it, the voice in my head sounded like a 4 year old, not a teenager or young adult.  If I was your boss and you presented me with a memo looking like that, you'd have a problem seeing what you typed through all the red ink on it.

Welcome to Army.ca and good luck.

MM
MM

Remember the basics of Medicine - "Pink is GOOD, Blue is BAD, Air goes in AND out, Blood Goes Round and Round"

I may sound like a pessimist, but I am a realist.

Offline MedCorps

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Re: med tech questions
« Reply #18 on: April 21, 2011, 21:10:07 »
1.  No - BMQ would be done locally, it would be unlikely you'd go to Chilliwack, as PCP isn't the required level of training for a Res Med Tech.


Small correction, mostly semantic. 

PCP IS indeed required for Res F Med Tech.  It is NOT required for Res F Med A.

The Res F has brought back the Med A designator for pers with the RQL3 / RQL4 qualification. If a Med A gains both the RQL3 and RQL4 Med A qualification (or the Reg F QL3) AND PCP qualification they are considered an apprentice Med Tech.  We are seeing more Res F Med A's doing the PCP (or gaining the qualification from the PLAR process) to become Res F Med Techs.

That is as far as they have figured out things right now.  They (D HS Pers) are in the process of rationalizing the RQL6 into a two part (?) RQL5 which when part I and II are completed will be the equivalent of the Ref F QL5A and the person will be a Res F Journeyman Med A.  If the Res F Med A then does AEC they will be granted the Med Tech qualification at the Journeyman level. Well at least that is the plan. We are also seeing more Res F Med A's doing the Reg F QL5 Med Tech Course.

The Res F also has a LPN stream now authorized as part of these changes, but I am not sure how all this going to turn out / be managed. The only think I know for sure is that the CF will not be training Res F LPN's and this will be granted via the PLAR process.

The whole goal is to clearly indicate who in the Res F has the same qualifications of their Ref F counterparts.  This has become important for tasking and employment purposes. 

If you need the message number that authorizes things  and explains the process let me know and I will send it to you.

Cheers,

MC

Offline medicineman

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Re: med tech questions
« Reply #19 on: April 22, 2011, 03:46:52 »
Learn a new thing every day...sounds like they still have to either do the PCP on their own dime or luck into a scheme where it's paid for them though, correct?

MM
MM

Remember the basics of Medicine - "Pink is GOOD, Blue is BAD, Air goes in AND out, Blood Goes Round and Round"

I may sound like a pessimist, but I am a realist.

Offline MedCorps

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Re: med tech questions
« Reply #20 on: April 22, 2011, 10:27:46 »
Pretty much...

One of the recruiting goals of the CFHS Res F is to find personnel who are already qualified on civilian street and then give them the military skills to make them employable in that field within the CF. Hence for Med Techs they are looking to recruit people with the PCP qualification (or something that can be PLAR'ed as equivalent) and then once done RQL3 / RQL4 they can be employed as we would employ a Reg F QL3 Med Tech both in domestic ops and expeditionary ops.

The Res F is also starting to fund more and more PCP candidates.  These are Med A's who have done the RQL3 / RQL4, with ideally high course standing, and wish to take the next step. They have no "hard" billets on the PCP but seem to be getting a few of their personnel on on ever course that is CF sponsored. Another thing I have heard them doing is paying for some program in Alberta (?) some sort of EMT (?) program that has PLAR status with PCP.  It is still by now means the rule that Res F pers are again PCP qualification but it does allow for people with the skill set from civi street, people who are keen and want good Reg F employment domestic and deployed, and people who are thinking about CT to the Reg F an option for additional training or skills recognition.
 
The largest issue with getting Res F personnel PCP qualified is getting them to take the number of months required away from their lives in civi street to go do the training. This is part of the reason that PCP has not been mandated for the Res F (the other parts being cost, seat availability, employment requirement, and ability to maintain skill set). Right now I am told if you are a reservist who has sound performance both in the home unit and on RQL3 / RQL4 and the CoC thinks that the cost of PCP is a sound investment for the CFMS and you want to do PCP training then the funds are available to convert you from a Med A to a Med Tech.  I am not in the Res F so I am not sure if this is true, but it is what I am being told.

Now... I will not get into the issues if I think PCP is even required for Med Techs or Res F / Reg F spot sharing for PCP as this are subjects one discusses in private.

Cheers,

MC   
« Last Edit: April 22, 2011, 10:31:17 by MedCorps »

Offline mariomike

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Re: med tech questions
« Reply #21 on: April 22, 2011, 10:57:36 »
The largest issue with getting Res F personnel PCP qualified is getting them to take the number of months required away from their lives in civi street to go do the training.

AEMCA is required to qualify as a Primary Care Paramedic in Ontario.
That seems to be the benchmark the CF is aiming for:
http://www.forces.gc.ca/health-sante/hp-ps/mcsp-pmcc/aemca-eng.asp
« Last Edit: April 22, 2011, 13:40:12 by mariomike »
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Offline RMT

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Re: med tech questions
« Reply #22 on: April 26, 2011, 23:57:19 »
Medcorps,

The program that is paying for Res F Med A to become Reg F QL3 Med Tech is what is more commonly referred to as "PCP Initiative." Everything you've stated in regards to the program is correct. The main incentive for the member is not only to become QL3 Med Tech qualified but the program allows for a class B contract while the member is attending school (for a maximum of 12 months, meaning it is normally offered during the 2nd of the PCP program here in Ontario) and then a class C contract for deployment on either domestic operations or overseas.

Also, through this program, the member can take the PCP program at any public of private college in Ontario. I don't know how the PCP program works in other provinces so I can only speak to PCP Initiative as it applies to Ontario Med A looking to attend an Ontario college.


Offline mariomike

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Re: med tech questions
« Reply #23 on: April 27, 2011, 01:03:48 »
"Paramedic program benefits reserve units and CF:
HALIFAX, NS – Corporal Joshua Zruna, a Reserve medical technician serving with 33 (Halifax) Field Ambulance, recently became the third medical technician from his unit to graduate from the Primary Care Paramedic (PCP) program.":
http://www.army.forces.gc.ca/land-terre/news-nouvelles/story-reportage-eng.asp?id=2680

I believe "PCP Initiative" was discussed in another thread:
http://forums.milnet.ca/forums/index.php/topic,36097.msg371225.html#msg371225
"Therefore, to be considered for this program, the candidate must be able to provide a reasonable guarantee that employment with a civilian ambulance service is probable, and that sufficient work is available to keep the licence or certification current and in good standing."

« Last Edit: April 27, 2011, 21:17:00 by mariomike »
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Offline Boz519

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Re: Life of a Canadian Forces Medical technician
« Reply #24 on: July 19, 2011, 16:43:48 »
why is that