Author Topic: Life of a Canadian Forces Medical technician  (Read 89034 times)

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Offline Simian Turner

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Re: Life of a Canadian Forces Medical technician
« Reply #25 on: July 19, 2011, 17:35:13 »
Some CDUs are quite busy in Ottawa!
The grand essentials of happiness: something to do, something to love, something to hope for.  Allan K. Chalmers

Offline Hunter

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Re: med tech questions
« Reply #26 on: July 28, 2011, 11:33:17 »
MC if you could post or send me that message number it would be much appreciated.  I have been trying unsuccessfully to find it in order to clarify the issue with some members of my unit. 

Thanks!
Perfer et obdura; dolor hic tibi proderit olim
(Be patient and tough; one day this pain will be useful to you)
- Ovid

Offline nickanick

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Re: Life of a Canadian Forces Medical technician
« Reply #27 on: September 27, 2011, 02:01:42 »
Which training phrase will med techs be working with the combat trades in the field?
Do they get posted right after the SQ?

Offline medicineman

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Re: Life of a Canadian Forces Medical technician
« Reply #28 on: September 27, 2011, 13:12:00 »
Which training phrase phase will med techs be working with the combat trades in the field?
Do they get posted right after the SQ?

There - fixed that for you.  You get posted after your QL3 is completed - it's not in a training phase, it's in your operational phase.

MM
MM

Remember the basics of Medicine - "Pink is GOOD, Blue is BAD, Air goes in AND out, Blood Goes Round and Round"

I may sound like a pessimist, but I am a realist.

Offline Hamish Seggie

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Re: Life of a Canadian Forces Medical technician
« Reply #29 on: September 27, 2011, 13:29:15 »
Which training phrase ...

"Here's some Cepacol....."   ;)

My apolgies to the Medtechs....I could not resist!!
Freedom Isn't Free   "Never Shall I Fail My Brothers"

“Do everything that is necessary and nothing that is not".

Offline medicineman

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Re: Life of a Canadian Forces Medical technician
« Reply #30 on: September 27, 2011, 17:14:22 »
Cepacol's out of the system...foot powder for everthing now  ;D.

MM
MM

Remember the basics of Medicine - "Pink is GOOD, Blue is BAD, Air goes in AND out, Blood Goes Round and Round"

I may sound like a pessimist, but I am a realist.

Offline Old Sweat

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Re: Life of a Canadian Forces Medical technician
« Reply #31 on: September 27, 2011, 17:20:53 »
Cepacol's out of the system...foot powder for everthing now  ;D.

MM

But it tastes awful. :P

Offline medicineman

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Re: Life of a Canadian Forces Medical technician
« Reply #32 on: September 27, 2011, 17:22:56 »
Yeah - but most of the youngens these days are used to snorting powder anyway...

MM
MM

Remember the basics of Medicine - "Pink is GOOD, Blue is BAD, Air goes in AND out, Blood Goes Round and Round"

I may sound like a pessimist, but I am a realist.

Offline nickanick

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Re: Life of a Canadian Forces Medical technician
« Reply #33 on: October 16, 2011, 03:56:20 »
what kind of transportation method does med techs use to bring a wounded man back to base for further treatment?

Offline MedCorps

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Re: Life of a Canadian Forces Medical technician
« Reply #34 on: October 16, 2011, 09:18:57 »
Back to base is a bit of a misnomer, but we will review the evacuation options.

There are a few options.

The most basic - Carry them without fancy equipment.  Carry them on an improvised stretcher. Carry them on a proper  pole stretcher.  This is hard work so distance is limited.  Place stretcher on a stretcher carriage, which is a thing with two wheels often called a Stollenwerk after the manufacture.  This again is a short distance, flat terrain, option. See the folding green thing with two wheels here: http://www.stollenwerk-koeln.de/dw_eng/index_eng.html

Ambulances - The LSVW Ambulance, The Ford F 450 Ambulance , The Bision Armoured Ambulance. This is the domain of the Med Tech and the primary means of land evacuation.

Helicopter - Most commonly the CH-146 Griffon Helicopter or the Chinook helicopter.  Med Techs work on these. If you are working with the Americans the Black Hawk is also quite common. Med Techs have worked on these.
 
Airplanes- Most, if not all, of our fixed wing aircraft can be used as an aeromedical evacuation platform with some conversion.  Med Techs work on these.

Sea - If you are working with the Americans you might find yourself on a hospital ship evacuating patients.

Then there are non-standard evacuation platforms which is pretty much anything you can load a casualty in to get them to care, but was not actually designed for casualty evacuation.  Overseas, in various locations,  I saw casualties being evacuated in everything from a donkey, to a home made wheel barrow, to a ATV, to a pick up truck, to a MLVW, to a light observation helicopter  (OH-58).

I hope that is of help.

MC

Offline nickanick

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Re: Life of a Canadian Forces Medical technician
« Reply #35 on: October 18, 2011, 05:44:48 »
Thanks MedCorps :)

Do you get to travel  being a Medtech?

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Re: Life of a Canadian Forces Medical technician
« Reply #36 on: October 18, 2011, 07:15:08 »

Do you get to travel  being a Medtech?

They do.

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Re: Life of a Canadian Forces Medical technician
« Reply #37 on: October 18, 2011, 08:25:30 »
I got to travel lots...Calgary to Wainwright, Waniwright to Calgary (did those trips lots), Home to Sarcee, Sarcee to Home, Calgary to Suffield, Suffield to Calagary, Cornwallis, St Jean, Borden, Ottawa, Cold Lake, Whitehorse, 29 Palms, Pendleton, Croatia, Kingston, Fort Drum, Petawawa, Broughton Island, Gagetown, St John, Halifax, Montreal, Kabul via a number of places, Port au Prince, Toronto, Vancouver, Winnipeg, Dauphin, Orangeville, Victoria, Eureka - the list is by no means complete, but I think you get the idea.

MM
MM

Remember the basics of Medicine - "Pink is GOOD, Blue is BAD, Air goes in AND out, Blood Goes Round and Round"

I may sound like a pessimist, but I am a realist.

Offline nickanick

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Re: Life of a Canadian Forces Medical technician
« Reply #38 on: October 18, 2011, 09:34:51 »
I got to travel lots...Calgary to Wainwright, Waniwright to Calgary (did those trips lots), Home to Sarcee, Sarcee to Home, Calgary to Suffield, Suffield to Calagary, Cornwallis, St Jean, Borden, Ottawa, Cold Lake, Whitehorse, 29 Palms, Pendleton, Croatia, Kingston, Fort Drum, Petawawa, Broughton Island, Gagetown, St John, Halifax, Montreal, Kabul via a number of places, Port au Prince, Toronto, Vancouver, Winnipeg, Dauphin, Orangeville, Victoria, Eureka - the list is by no means complete, but I think you get the idea.

MM

Thanks for the detail reply.  :)

May I ask where have you been deployed to, as a Medtech?

Offline medicineman

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Re: Life of a Canadian Forces Medical technician
« Reply #39 on: October 18, 2011, 13:48:06 »
Let me see - Croatia, Afghanistan, Haiti, Broughton Island (even though it's in Canada, it is very remote, so I call it a deployment, same with Eureka).  The spots in the States were visits for training purposes so I don't consider them deployments.

MM
MM

Remember the basics of Medicine - "Pink is GOOD, Blue is BAD, Air goes in AND out, Blood Goes Round and Round"

I may sound like a pessimist, but I am a realist.

Offline Hamish Seggie

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Re: Life of a Canadian Forces Medical technician
« Reply #40 on: October 18, 2011, 13:52:19 »
Let me see - Croatia, Afghanistan, Haiti, Broughton Island (even though it's in Canada, it is very remote, so I call it a deployment, same with Eureka).  The spots in the States were visits for training purposes so I don't consider them deployments.

MM

Medtechs are in highe demand. My favorite saying is:

IF I was a Pl WO and had the choice of a fourth rifle section OR

a medtech and a good signaller....I'd take the medic and tthe signaller.
Freedom Isn't Free   "Never Shall I Fail My Brothers"

“Do everything that is necessary and nothing that is not".

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Re: Life of a Canadian Forces Medical technician
« Reply #41 on: October 18, 2011, 16:55:39 »
Medtechs are in highe demand. My favorite saying is:

IF I was a Pl WO and had the choice of a fourth rifle section OR

a medtech and a good signaller....I'd take the medic and tthe signaller.

The signaller was my bodyguard generally when I was at the platoon level, at least when the umbilical was cut from the platoon commander, then I was trying to keep up with the REALLY TALL platoon WO.

MM
MM

Remember the basics of Medicine - "Pink is GOOD, Blue is BAD, Air goes in AND out, Blood Goes Round and Round"

I may sound like a pessimist, but I am a realist.

Offline m.k

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Re: Life of a Canadian Forces Medical technician
« Reply #42 on: October 18, 2011, 17:49:40 »
I got to travel lots...Calgary to Wainwright, Waniwright to Calgary (did those trips lots), Home to Sarcee, Sarcee to Home, Calgary to Suffield, Suffield to Calagary, Cornwallis, St Jean, Borden, Ottawa, Cold Lake, Whitehorse, 29 Palms, Pendleton, Croatia, Kingston, Fort Drum, Petawawa, Broughton Island, Gagetown, St John, Halifax, Montreal, Kabul via a number of places, Port au Prince, Toronto, Vancouver, Winnipeg, Dauphin, Orangeville, Victoria, Eureka - the list is by no means complete, but I think you get the idea.

MM

What brought you to Orangeville?

Offline medicineman

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Re: Life of a Canadian Forces Medical technician
« Reply #43 on: October 18, 2011, 22:04:10 »
What brought you to Orangeville?

2 rotations on my PA course.

MM
MM

Remember the basics of Medicine - "Pink is GOOD, Blue is BAD, Air goes in AND out, Blood Goes Round and Round"

I may sound like a pessimist, but I am a realist.

Offline gmoney1984

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Career of Medical Technician
« Reply #44 on: December 20, 2011, 04:12:52 »
Hi,
I am currently interested in enlisting as a Medical Technician, and would love to hear some day in the life stories of the job.  I want to know the day to day of a med techs life, not only deployed but also at home.  Also, how often do they get deployed, for how long, and is it possible to request to ask to be attached to a combat arms unit?  Also how does their pay scale work?  I have done research about the profession but would like a more intimate view from an enlisted member. Thank you all for your time, any answers can either be pm'ed to me or just written in the thread.
Sincerly,
Kevin

Offline Occam

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Re: Career of Medical Technician
« Reply #45 on: December 20, 2011, 05:38:16 »
Did you do a search?  There's lots of info here.

P.S. We don't have "enlisted" members in Canada.

Offline Rider Pride

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Re: Career of Medical Technician
« Reply #46 on: December 20, 2011, 11:17:46 »
P.S. We don't have "enlisted" members in Canada.

Sure we do, everyone in the CF is enlisted (definition: to enroll, usually voluntarily, for military service)

We just don't use the term within the CF to describe our noncommissioned members.
"Return with your shield, or upon it."

Offline Occam

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Re: Career of Medical Technician
« Reply #47 on: December 20, 2011, 12:08:48 »
Sure we do, everyone in the CF is enlisted (definition: to enroll, usually voluntarily, for military service)

We just don't use the term within the CF to describe our noncommissioned members.

Which means "enlisted" is not used within the context of non-commissioned members in the CF, and use of the term "enlisted" would be incorrect here...

Online mariomike

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Re: Life of a Canadian Forces Medical technician
« Reply #48 on: July 08, 2012, 09:58:05 »
This may be old news. I only read it the other day in our news letter to retired members.

T-EMS has "re-instituted the joint field placement program with DND, allowing approximately 30 Med-Techs to be precepted in Toronto annually."

That's all it said.

I recall the original program. But, I'm not sure when it ended.
« Last Edit: July 08, 2012, 10:12:53 by mariomike »
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Offline MedTech32

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Day to Day Life of a Med Tech
« Reply #49 on: April 02, 2013, 21:34:46 »
Mods can you please pin this, I'm getting tired of repeating myself and I'm sure others are as well. 

Now I can't speak for all Med Techs, but generally if you're working at a CDU it's like this.

0700hrs Arrive for work and change into work dress
0715hrs, quick pow pow with the Master Corporal for last min changes to the plan
0725hrs, everyone is ready to go at their station, Lab, Treatment, Pharmacy/Stores etc.
0730hrs, let the masses in for sick parade this number varies from base to base
1000hrs,  :coffee: quickly cause someone with chest pain is about to walk in and cause you to forget about your coffee for the next hour if you don't
1200hrs, finish with chest pain guy/hand off to poor guy on duty for lunch run upstairs, nuke coffee, eat lunch.

For our CDU from 1300 to 1500hrs was the time allotted to us to complete our secondary duties and assignments and to perform any pers admin that needed to be completed.   After 1500hrs, all except the Duty Medic were dismissed for PT.  We also did weekly lectures which were given by a medic or clinician.

Just kidding not everyday is that exciting, only some days.  Most of your days in a Clinic setting, is seeing and treating patients, and keeping the place clean.  It's pretty boring stuff really.  Some days we'd fight over a few sutures or a minor surgery to assist on, just for something to do. 

Now this was my experience on an Air Force Base in a small clinic.   I can tell you though that it was pretty much the same when I went on work up and in the ROLE 1 in Afghanistan. 

Saying that, there are some differences to working under canvass and out of panniers.  Especially with having to do more with less, and trying to keep everything clean is a constant battle.

Working attached to a section/platoon/company is by far the best and I loved every min of it.  Although, talk about having to do more with less.  All you have is what's on your back and stuffed in your pockets. 


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