Author Topic: Math for signals  (Read 20294 times)

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Offline sky777

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Re: Math for signals
« Reply #25 on: May 26, 2010, 17:02:21 »
More than likely the same (or similar) as the one on the CF website.  I'm pretty sure there isn't a CFAT "pertaining to a trade" as that is what CFAT results are used to determine.

Is this the one you mean?  http://www.forces.ca/media/_PDF/preparing_for_aptitude_test_en.pdf
I have heard from people who passed CFAT that your example is much easy according to reality.
Is it true?
It means for preparing we will need much harder  examples.
But some people think that there is not preparation for CFAT.If you have math skills - you will pass test.

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Re: Math for signals
« Reply #26 on: May 26, 2010, 17:07:14 »
I will probably agree that the actual test may be harder for some people. 

There are several places on the internet that have similar practice tests.
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Offline Neolithium

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Re: Math for signals
« Reply #27 on: May 26, 2010, 17:38:55 »
Before I wrote my CFAT I was browsing through some of the existing threads, time and again people had suggested doing some of the online IQ Tests.  At the time it sounded a bit silly to me, however it proved to be pretty sound advice that I'm glad I followed. 
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Offline Robbie4296

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Re: Math for signals
« Reply #28 on: May 26, 2010, 18:29:23 »
I will probably agree that the actual test may be harder for some people. 

There are several places on the internet that have similar practice tests.
Could you post a link on these similar practise threads, Thanks

Offline Neolithium

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Re: Math for signals
« Reply #29 on: May 26, 2010, 18:41:07 »
Could you post a link on these similar practise threads, Thanks

These were some of the links which helped me brush up on things.
http://forums.army.ca/forums/index.php/topic,17703.msg673001.html#msg673001
"If A is a success in life, then A = X+Y+Z. Work is X, Y is play and Z is keeping your mouth shut."
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Offline sky777

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Re: Math for signals
« Reply #30 on: May 26, 2010, 19:20:16 »
Try this also:

http://www.psc-cfp.gc.ca/ppc-cpp/pract-test-examn-pract/index-eng.htm

Also you can watch military US test  (ASVAB).It can help you to train your brain.
http://books.google.com/books?q=ASVAB
« Last Edit: May 26, 2010, 19:34:08 by sky777 »

Offline Robbie4296

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Re: Math for signals
« Reply #31 on: May 26, 2010, 22:03:08 »
Much thanks!

Offline bigabe

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Re: Math for signals
« Reply #32 on: May 27, 2010, 00:12:30 »
That's not math, just like IP addressing isn't math. There's numbers involved, but...

As a friendly occupational rivalry, I'm just going to guess you're an Op not a Tech.

I've seen this twice now on major exercise. 

Now, let's say theres 200 people in this Biv and a few hardworking techs and linemen have ran the fibre and copper all over the place to get every tent a handful of connections and a few patch cables so they can have internet on their cots and talk to mommy.  This same network is actually being used by a CO doing his distance education, an RSM emailing everyones charge reports etc.

I've only ever seen HCLOS's with crappy ZyXel (sp?) $15 walmart routers, and I've definitely never seen a lineman with a CISCO cert to serial into the switches.

So, here's your situation.  A router into a net of switches running over 500 drops in the field.  500 connections on an HCLOS is unusable.  How do you make sure that the CO's laptop is always connected (and his iPhone) and that the cook watching porn doesn't get the IP address if there isn't space?  Then how do you make sure a guy turning on a laptop in the TOC/JOC will take precedence over the mechanic who is skyping the other mechanics daughter?

You have to use subnetting.  255.255.255.0 that you've seen in your internet settings isn't arbitrary.  Now, you can't just type  255.255.255.5 either. 

With several crucial topics aside (OSI Layer 3, Network Classes A,B,C, 24 bits per octet etc)
If you have 185 "Recreational" connections in the camp, you need to understand this chart:

128  64   32   16   8   4   2   1
---    --     --     --    -    -    -   -
 1     0     1     1     1   0   0   1

128 +  0 + 32  +16 + 8 + 0 + 0 + 1 = 185

Thats just binary conversion from 185 to 10111001.  To figure out the mask so you can separate the subnets you're getting into Class Code:255-(2^'Range')
so 255.255.255.254 is valid but .253 is not  xxx.192 is valid but xxx.198 is not etc.  Follow me? 

ALL OF THAT, just to plug majic interweb wires into porno screens to make the jimmy happy.

Yup.  Fighting the network fight.

Dude, there is SOOOO much math involved with Ip addresses.  [/rant]

P.S.  All of the above information found in your local QL5 qualified LCIS techs head.  Its all from our 5's.
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Offline rmc_wannabe

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Re: Math for signals
« Reply #33 on: May 27, 2010, 02:28:54 »

P.S.  All of the above information found in your local QL5 qualified LCIS techs head.  Its all from our 5's.

And a fair amount of CFSCE OSQ Courses (mainly CSN, Win Server Admin) and if you're lucky a CISCO CCNA course. All of which I, an Operator have attended and have used regulary in my current position.  :P

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Re: Math for signals
« Reply #34 on: May 27, 2010, 07:07:58 »
hardworking techs and linemen

To continue the friendly rivalry: quoted phrase is an oxymoron.  ;D

Offline CommTech13

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Re: Math for signals
« Reply #35 on: May 27, 2010, 07:53:22 »
I have heard from people who passed CFAT that your example is much easy according to reality.
Is it true?
It means for preparing we will need much harder  examples.
But some people think that there is not preparation for CFAT.If you have math skills - you will pass test.

Well first off the sample tests on forces.ca are better suited to demonstrate the format of the test, and the nature of the questions that will be asked, rather than the difficulty of the question.

Ok well i took the CFAT yesterday, and my trade choice is LCIS tech. Here's the deal in my opinion, the verbal is hard enough that you could benefit from brushing up on some of the less commonly used words in English language... let's just say they use words that are more complicated than dog - but with this being said I think they put the least amount of 'scrutiny' on your score in this section (maybe because I'm going for a tech position, quite possibly varies with your specific trade choices). The spatial section is something that your are skilled at, or aren't, not much you can do here. For the math part you could definitely benefit greatly from working on your multiplication, division, and ratios. I don't want to give too much away so if I did please just delete the post, but my point here being the best way to prepare is to brush up on those math skills, in my opinion.

Offline Robbie4296

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Re: Math for signals
« Reply #36 on: May 27, 2010, 08:15:46 »
Yes agreed, took the test that were posted on the link above and compared to the practise one supplied by CFRC, big difference some stuff is similar but overall a test is a test.

Offline Neolithium

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Re: Math for signals
« Reply #37 on: May 27, 2010, 09:44:38 »
And a fair amount of CFSCE OSQ Courses (mainly CSN, Win Server Admin) and if you're lucky a CISCO CCNA course. All of which I, an Operator have attended and have used regulary in my current position.  :P

CCNA Course? Thanks! Something else to put into my long term goals list, I've wanted to take the plunge into Cisco gear for a long time; unfortunately their enterprise-level pricing makes even their distance-learning certifications....ridiculously expensive.
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Offline bigabe

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Re: Math for signals
« Reply #38 on: May 27, 2010, 12:27:47 »
To continue the friendly rivalry: quoted phrase is an oxymoron.  ;D

I just laughed and shot chunks of cereal across my living room.  Mostly because its true.  I mean, I am eating cereal in my own living room at 1130 on a weekday. :)

CCNA Course? Thanks! Something else to put into my long term goals list, I've wanted to take the plunge into Cisco gear for a long time; unfortunately their enterprise-level pricing makes even their distance-learning certifications....ridiculously expensive.

clackity clackity ... filling out online ILP form... clackity clackity ...*poof* now doing the distance ed Cisco course on DNDs dime. 
« Last Edit: May 27, 2010, 12:36:37 by bigabe »
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Re: Math for signals
« Reply #39 on: May 27, 2010, 20:55:58 »
clackity clackity ... filling out online ILP form... clackity clackity ...*poof* now doing the distance ed Cisco course on DNDs dime.

He's not in yet, but will probably just have to pick IST as his sub occ to get the Cisco course.

Offline Occam

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Re: Math for signals
« Reply #40 on: May 27, 2010, 21:12:32 »
clackity clackity ... filling out online ILP form... clackity clackity ...*poof* now doing the distance ed Cisco course on DNDs dime.

I doubt that ILP will be approved.  The reimbursement program says "Courses can be directly related to current job or MOC, but must supplement, not replace, training or education required for the members current job or MOC".  I think you'll find that ICND1/ICND2/CCNA boot camp courses are too closely related to a Sig Op/LCIS Tech/ATIS Tech job function for CDA to fund the training.  Anyone I know who has those quals got them by the unit paying for the course because the member was employed in a position requiring those skills.

Offline bigabe

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Re: Math for signals
« Reply #41 on: May 28, 2010, 10:40:13 »
I've only ever heard of things like SCUBA Diving and Equestrian Appreciation being denied.  All it takes is a substantiation paragraph.  The better you write it, the more likely to get approved.  There's techs who have done everything from Classic German Cinema to Network+ and A+ that work in CNR shops.  Not quite CCNA mind, but same idea.

Really, its an online form.  No harm in filling it out, worst case scenario is you get an email saying 'Denied: [Reason]'

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Offline Neolithium

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Re: Math for signals
« Reply #42 on: May 28, 2010, 10:46:31 »
There is quite a bit of time before any of those types of courses would be something to delve into, I just like having a few generalized goals that point me in the right direction and fine tune them when the opportunities come up. 
"If A is a success in life, then A = X+Y+Z. Work is X, Y is play and Z is keeping your mouth shut."
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Offline Delta26

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Re: Math for signals
« Reply #43 on: June 12, 2010, 23:54:23 »
 Just a question here, but I'm looking at LCIS, and am a+ certified..  If I gave my recruiter all the details in regards to what the knowledge required  to pass the exams, would that help me any?

a+ essentials exam objectives
http://www.comptia.org/Libraries/Exam_Objectives/CompTIA_A_220-701.sflb.ashx

a+ practical exam objectives
http://www.comptia.org/Libraries/Exam_Objectives/CompTIA_A_220-702.sflb.ashx

Offline Occam

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Re: Math for signals
« Reply #44 on: June 13, 2010, 00:53:10 »
Just a question here, but I'm looking at LCIS, and am a+ certified..  If I gave my recruiter all the details in regards to what the knowledge required  to pass the exams, would that help me any?

Not in the slightest.

Offline JDR

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Re: Math for signals
« Reply #45 on: December 26, 2010, 01:27:09 »
I saw that  someone said to brush up on basics like addition, subtraction, ratios and suchwhat, and near the start of the thread someone had brought up things like calculus, and other advanced functions of math.
Are such advanced academic methods necessary to be knowledgeable in as an NCO, as well as as an officer?
Is there a ton of memorization of formulae? What level of prejudice is exhibited against a single mistake on the CFAT, if you're allowed to answer that?