Author Topic: Degenerative Arthritis  (Read 4827 times)

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Offline ERIC FORREST

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Degenerative Arthritis
« on: September 13, 2010, 01:31:11 »
I have been out of the Military for 15years now and have degenerative arthritis of the spine and surgeons are telling me it is do to the Combat Arms life style. Has anyone else out there having this problem or had a MRI of the neck and spine? This is pretty scary stuff, i was told that I should have had this checked earlier, well you know how that goes, we "suck up reload and soldier on" right! Life isn't all it can be now! Anyone else out there interested in this hidden medical problem?

Offline 57Chevy

    widower.

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Re: Degenerative Arthritis
« Reply #1 on: September 13, 2010, 06:57:42 »
It is more readily known and classed as degenerative disc disease.
More infomation on the subject can be found here

Offline George Wallace

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Re: Degenerative Arthritis
« Reply #2 on: September 13, 2010, 07:21:07 »
Many on this site, who have worked on tracked vehicles for many years, have been diagnosed with compressed discs and signs of arthritis in the lower back.  So this is more common than one would think.  In many cases exercise has been prescribed as one way of combating the pain.   Although being told about having signs of arthritis was a real blow initially, staying active has eliminated any signs of the paralysing pain I had.

As for compensation, have you tried applying to Veterans Affairs?  The Legion has officers who can assist in making a claim.  You may also try SISIP and see what they may be able to do for you.
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Offline Simian Turner

    is a veteran who enjoys oddities!

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Re: Degenerative Arthritis
« Reply #3 on: September 13, 2010, 16:15:31 »
In my case, heredity and 13 years of Combat Arms lifestyle followed by 14 years of more office type service have made for an painful time from 45 years-old+.  There are medications, lower impact physical activity and excellent core exercises to keep things tolerable.  It is shocking diagnosis when first presented but life goes on.
The grand essentials of happiness: something to do, something to love, something to hope for.  Allan K. Chalmers

Offline Chilme

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Re: Degenerative Arthritis
« Reply #4 on: October 05, 2010, 20:35:30 »
In my case, heredity and 13 years of Combat Arms lifestyle followed by 14 years of more office type service have made for an painful time from 45 years-old+.  There are medications, lower impact physical activity and excellent core exercises to keep things tolerable.  It is shocking diagnosis when first presented but life goes on.

Speaking as an Exercise Physiologist, I would like to say that a number of your guys have highlighted an important point.  LISTEN TO YOUR BODY!  A pain stimulus exists for a reason.  It tells your brain that something is wrong somewhere in the body.  If something acts up in your body, tone down your activity and allow your body to heal.  Try and work inside of pain thresholds.

With that being said, I recognize it is not always possible to tone down physical activity in Combat Arms.  Taking pain killers can help with immediate issues, but often they just mask a problem until later when it has become worse.  If your care about your future health and any hope of comfort during your retirement, you should go, when opportunity arises, to the MIR when your body sends you pain signals that aren't temporary.

For those already riding the pain train, stay active with activities that don't aggravate injuries, stretch often, and now that you have the freedom STOP when the body sens you a pain signal to do so.