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All things Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV)

MilEME09

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Remius said:
When it comes to work from home for Government it likely will have some advantages.  Will it be better? Not sure but our team is actually producing more.  Not saying I like it but it may be a new reality for me at least.

GDP contracting has a lot more to do with the economy shutting down in large sectors.  At the same time many businesses are show how weak their models are by not being adaptable.

When you have Energy, manufacturing, hospitality & Tourism shut down just to name a few major sectors you are going to have a contraction in GDP.
 

Remius

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And, if more sectors move to a work from home model, (those that can) you will see far more resilience to events like a pandemic.
 

OldSolduer

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Humphrey Bogart said:
People commenting that we are going to do things differently and the upcoming work from home revolution is better, meanwhile GDP contracts by 10%.  :rofl:


Can the "work from home" lot now claim some expenses on their taxes? Or will the current governments ignore that?
 

Remius

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Hamish Seggie said:
Can the "work from home" lot now claim some expenses on their taxes? Or will the current governments ignore that?

https://business.financialpost.com/personal-finance/taxes/can-you-deduct-home-office-expenses-if-youre-forced-to-work-from-home-during-the-pandemic

 

Brad Sallows

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You can claim legitimate reasonable expenses, but it's not a tax write-off party.

Initial resistance to shifting work from in-office to in-home is natural (personally and collectively).

How well people adapt depends on tools.  For example, in the past someone might come to my desk to deal with an issue.  Things I didn't like about that: interruption of what I was doing (most people will find it harder to say "later" in person than over e-means), distraction to other people in the area, lack of privacy.  Now we ping (using chat tool or email) to determine availability, agree on time (immediate or later), and use voice and screen-sharing.  Within 30 seconds of being pinged, I can have a voice call (via tools, not phone) and screen share going.  I consider it a vast improvement.

E-meetings allow me to work without distracting other participants for the 95+% of the meeting that doesn't require my rapt attention.  This is particularly useful during long meetings.  It's worth about 4 hours of recovered time (meaning: gained productive hours) in my usual week.  Another vast improvement.

Not commuting saves me 10 hours per week and eliminates associated costs.  2 hours a day represents an approximately 40% increase of my "own time" each working day, and it is pure leisure time.

Obviously, there's no implied requirement to work only from home, all the time.  Use of satellite offices can realize many of the gains.

For those with the capability, it's worth at least a pilot.
 

Remius

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Some of the advantages, as well as what you listed, would be reduced sick days, less use of personal days for smaller things, less traffic congestion, less distractions from non essential work (because I am guy in the office I get asked to do physical stuff from time to time that aren’t my core tasks) or spending 30mins helping someone unjam a printer they effed up.
 

Remius

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Jarnhamar said:
Can someone working from home make a WSIBclaim if they fall on their stairs?

Don’t laugh. When we started setting up at home an email went out warning everyone to be careful when setting up.  Someone apparently got hurt.

But...

I also expect a lot of claims and injuries since people were forced home and may not have the right ergonomics. 

Set up at home is key I think.
 

daftandbarmy

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Jarnhamar said:
Can someone working from home make a WSIBclaim if they fall on their stairs?


Health, Safety, and Workers’ Compensation

As employees shift to a home-based workplace, employers should consider ways to promote workplace health and safety.

Employers should check in with employees to ensure that their home workspace is safe, free from hazards and facilitates productivity. Employers may consider implementing minimum standards for WFH arrangements. Employers can require employees to submit photographs of their workspace to ensure compliance with employer expectations. Employers may also consider having employees enter into an agreement that sets out expectations on the health and safety of their home workspace.

Employers should also consider whether the home workspace is insured. Many employer liability policies will encompass WFH arrangements, but this should be verified. Employees may alternatively be covered by their personal home insurance policy.

Whether employees are working from home or in person, there are critical practises that each employer should encourage employees keep up to maintain the health and safety of the workspace. These practices alleviate the risk of spreading COVID-19, which include:
•Practising good hygiene and regular hand washing.
•Maintaining clean workspaces by routinely disinfecting equipment and surfaces.
•Integrating breaks and rest periods.
•Practising social distancing by maintaining space between other persons and minimizing social contact.


https://www.mccarthy.ca/en/insights/blogs/canadian-employer-advisor/covid-19-update-new-normal-facilitating-work-home-arrangements
 

OceanBonfire

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Military reports 36 cases of COVID-19 in members working in Quebec, Ontario nursing homes

The Canadian Forces say 36 members working in long-term care homes in Ontario and Quebec have now become sick with COVID-19.

That's up from 28 cases of the novel coronavirus among those troops less than a week ago.

The military has been deployed to nursing homes in the two provinces to reinforce workers overwhelmed by the illness, unable to keep up with residents' needs because of all the protective measures they need to take, or off work because they're ill themselves.

Much of their work is tasks such as food service and moving and maintaining equipment, with some medical staff also serving in the homes.

Fourteen of the military members with COVID-19 are in Ontario and 22 of them are in Quebec.

When the Forces started reporting the number of positive cases, they said they'd update the figures every two weeks but have revised that plan to give new numbers every day.


https://www.ctvnews.ca/health/coronavirus/military-reports-36-cases-of-covid-19-in-members-working-in-quebec-ontario-nursing-homes-1.4954819
 

dapaterson

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Jarnhamar

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Remius said:
Details to come when the Premier speaks.

None of it will be good.

I said when the CAF goes in to the homes we're going to be there for a long time. Workers walking away "because of safety issues" and us not ethically being able to leave after seeing the shitty conditions these people are suffering in.
 

Remius

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Jarnhamar said:
I said when the CAF goes in to the homes we're going to be there for a long time. Workers walking away "because of safety issues" and us not ethically being able to leave after seeing the shitty conditions these people are suffering in.

We shopped around for a suitable long term care facility for my father in law.  What we saw was scary.  We had to wait 3 years to get into the one we wanted.
 

Brad Sallows

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>Can someone working from home make a WSIBclaim if they fall on their stairs?

I certainly don't know; but my employer requires completion and sign-off of a long checklist, which is reviewed periodically, which addresses safety, ergonomics, and related issues.  Examples: surge protection for the eqpt, height and position of desks and chairs, availability of a fire extinguisher, etc.

There are certainly plenty of published guidelines to follow to make home working space safer and more pleasant.  Whether you can claim against tripping over your dog on the way to get another cup of coffee, though...
 

Colin Parkinson

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https://globalnews.ca/news/6986338/military-teams-raise-concerns-about-conditions-at-ontario-care-homes/?utm_medium=Facebook&utm_source=GlobalNews&fbclid=IwAR3xP9RU-Z1jDl-c39jIzcUol0g5vWuRq8VHP6hRYdPobgB4Q6S-LRLOR10

Military personnel sent to nursing homes in Ontario have observed shocking conditions, including “blatant disregard” for infection control measures, mistreatment of residents and a level of care described as “horrible,” according to documents obtained by Global News.

Canadian Armed Forces teams deployed to five of the province’s worst-hit long-term care homes to help control COVID-19 have raised concerns about each of the facilities, describing the care as ranging from below best practices to “borderline abusive, if not abusive” and worse, the documents show.

Infection prevention and control measures were found to be a particular problem, with Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) protocols going unheeded by staff, many of whom were not properly trained, according to the documents obtained from a source familiar with the mission.  Rest at link---
 

Kilted

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dapaterson said:
Per the CBC's David Cochrane,

PM @JustinTrudeau says military members deployed to Ontario long-term care homes have seen troubling things and those concerns have been shared with the provincial government. He says @fordnation  will have more to say on this later.

PM using words like shocked, disappointed, frustration, grief and anger to describe his reaction to what the military found in some Ontario long-term care homes.


I think that we are going to see a lot more government oversight on these places, even after this is over. I'm not surprised by these findings.
 

Blackadder1916

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Jarnhamar said:
Can someone working from home make a WSIBclaim if they fall on their stairs?


According to Alberta WCB, it depends.
https://www.wcb.ab.ca/assets/pdfs/employers/EFS_Telecommuting.pdf
Scenario 4:
Margaret receives a box of office supplies delivered to her
home. The supplies are paid for by her employer and are
necessary for her employment.

The box is large and, when carried, prevents her from seeing
her feet. As she carries the box down the stairs to her home
office, she trips and falls. Her doctor diagnoses a sprained
ankle, contusions and a concussion. Is Margaret covered?
Probably. Depending on the facts, the injury may be covered
even though it occurred outside the designated workspace.

The box is a hazard introduced by her employment and
contributed to the accident.

Scenario 5:
At noon, Margaret decides to take a lunch break. She leaves
her home office in the basement and climbs the stairs to her
kitchen.
On her way up the stairs, she misses a step, falls and cuts her
chin on a step. The cut requires three stitches. Is Margaret
covered?
Probably not. Margaret left her designated workspace
on personal business and the stairs are not a hazard of
employment.
 

Lumber

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Ontario Premier Doug Ford says the province has launched an investigation that could lead to criminal charges against five long-term care homes rocked by COVID-19.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/toronto/ontario-military-ltc-report-1.5585131

One things that I will take away from this as a positive is the integrity demonstrated by those members of the CAF serving in these locations, as well as their chains of command, who refused to turn a blind eye.

Here here, ladies and gentlemen.
 

mariomike

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Remius said:
What we saw was scary. 

Probably the way I must have felt, first time being sent into one on a job almost 50 years ago.
 
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