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All things Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV)

Quirky

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I mean how hard is it for the power that be to simply target LTC and elderly.

Virtue signalling trumps medicine.


80 year old white people are lower on the vaccination priority list than young aboriginals and racialized people.
 

daftandbarmy

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Virtue signalling trumps medicine.


80 year old white people are lower on the vaccination priority list than young aboriginals and racialized people.

They're more vulnerable, so they go to the front of the line. Makes sense....

Indigenous communities in Canada more vulnerable to COVID-19​

Members of Indigenous communities in Canada are proving more likely to contract COVID-19 and to fall seriously ill than other Canadians, reflecting economic and social disparities that afflict many Indigenous populations elsewhere in the world.

Last month in the central province of Manitoba, nearly half of all patients with COVID-19 in intensive care units were from First Nations communities, even though they make up about one-fifth of the region’s population.

Northern Manitoba communities, which reported virtually no cases of COVID-19 in the first wave of infections last year, now have the highest infection rates in the province.

On and off reserves, one in four members of Indigenous communities in Manitoba have tested positive for the disease stemming from the new coronavirus — double the rate for the province as a whole. Generally, epidemiologists consider a 5% positivity rate — the share of those tested who have the sickness — too high.

Indigenous populations in Canada face many of the vulnerabilities that place some individuals at a higher risk for contracting and even dying from COVID-19.

 

HiTechComms

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They're more vulnerable, so they go to the front of the line. Makes sense....

Indigenous communities in Canada more vulnerable to COVID-19​

Members of Indigenous communities in Canada are proving more likely to contract COVID-19 and to fall seriously ill than other Canadians, reflecting economic and social disparities that afflict many Indigenous populations elsewhere in the world.

Last month in the central province of Manitoba, nearly half of all patients with COVID-19 in intensive care units were from First Nations communities, even though they make up about one-fifth of the region’s population.

Northern Manitoba communities, which reported virtually no cases of COVID-19 in the first wave of infections last year, now have the highest infection rates in the province.

On and off reserves, one in four members of Indigenous communities in Manitoba have tested positive for the disease stemming from the new coronavirus — double the rate for the province as a whole. Generally, epidemiologists consider a 5% positivity rate — the share of those tested who have the sickness — too high.

Indigenous populations in Canada face many of the vulnerabilities that place some individuals at a higher risk for contracting and even dying from COVID-19.

Gotcha.. So now its about stopping people from getting the sniffles?

Granted tho I do agree with you on this.. I have family and friends that are indigenous. All of them of course have fled the "reserves" just like my parents fled "socialist utopia" of eastern block. Not to many people know this but Reserves are no different then a communist country and the Indian Act should be a mandatory study of Institutional Racism.

Aboriginal communities have disproportional representation in my aspects of the "instutionalistic" Canadian public services.



Oddly enough I find it funny that "cases" have been completely redefined from previous definitions of being hospitalized to our PCR test detected possible traces of corona virus in their system. Funny how no one actually pays Not attention to Hospitalization rates any more. Thank goodness the government is getting sued to find out the government numbers on this.

I wonder when we will ban candy bars because it may raise your sugar blood levels.
 

mariomike

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I wonder when we will ban candy bars because it may raise your sugar blood levels.
My parents didn't allow candy because of the dental bills.

But, I remember sitting in the backseat of the car, mom and dad up front smoking, with my kid sister on Mom's lap. I don't think we even had lap belts in the cars. :)
 

HiTechComms

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daftandbarmy

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HiTechComms

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Tie an onion to your belt; it prevents bad things.
Ironically.. I love onions. Costco has some Peruvian sweet onions. I can take one of these and eat it like an apple and I love it. I also like Garlic and use it in everything I cook.

Fun Eastern European Home Remedy.

Onion Syrup. You take an onion and slice it really thin and put in a Jar, while layering it you add sugar. For about a medium onion about 3 teaspoons of white granulated sugar. (Sweet or yellow onions are best)

Keep it in the fridge its good about for three days, it acts like a lozenge, I usually take it 3-5 times (when sick)a day of teaspoons of the Syrup that you get from the juices being pulled out.

I love it. The taste may be an acquired thing.

I have never been really ill as I try to take care of myself these days.
There is a worse remedy I can share but it usually made me vomit :p
 

daftandbarmy

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According to who, exactly. “Experts” or politicians?

Based on that article I shared earlier, it would seem some health experts might have been involved:

"Indigenous populations in Canada face many of the vulnerabilities that place some individuals at a higher risk for contracting and even dying from COVID-19. Josée Lavoie, a professor with the Department of Community Health at the University of Manitoba and director of Ongomiizwin Research, used the risk profile of First Nations in Manitoba to conduct infectious disease modelling at the beginning of the pandemic to help predict how many ventilators hospitals would need.

To model their predictions, Lavoie and her team used the H1N1 virus, an influenza virus that struck the United States in 2009 and then spread around the world. “The conditions on reserves have not changed dramatically,” Lavoie said. “For example, only half of First Nations have access to safe water. We also know that overcrowding has not been addressed, nor has food insecurity, marginalization and racism.” The team predicted that the same conditions that promoted the spread of H1N1 would likely contribute to the transmision of COVID-19, even though they are very different viruses."

There's a bunch of other smart people out there who seem to have done their homework too, e.g.,

COVID-19 and Indigenous peoples

We urge Member States and the international community to include the specific needs and priorities of indigenous peoples in addressing the global outbreak of COVID 19.
— Chair of the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues, Anne Nuorgam.

The coronavirus  (COVID-19)  pandemic  poses  a grave  health threat to Indigenous peoples around the world. Indigenous communities already experience poor access to healthcare, significantly higher rates of communicable and non-communicable diseases, lack of access to essential services, sanitation,  and  other key  preventive measures, such as  clean water, soap, disinfectant, etc. Likewise,  most  nearby  local medical facilities, if and when there are any, are often under-equipped and under-staffed. Even when  Indigenous peoples are able to access healthcare services,  they can face stigma and  discrimination. A key factor is to ensure these services and facilities are provided in indigenous languages, and as appropriate to the specific situation of Indigenous peoples.

 

daftandbarmy

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Interesting... top tip: better reinforce the recruiting centres :)

The future of work after COVID-19​


We find that a markedly different mix of occupations may emerge after the pandemic across the eight economies. Compared to our pre-COVID-19 estimates, we expect the largest negative impact of the pandemic to fall on workers in food service and customer sales and service roles, as well as less-skilled office support roles. Jobs in warehousing and transportation may increase as a result of the growth in e-commerce and the delivery economy, but those increases are unlikely to offset the disruption of many low-wage jobs. In the United States, for instance, customer service and food service jobs could fall by 4.3 million, while transportation jobs could grow by nearly 800,000. Demand for workers in the healthcare and STEM occupations may grow more than before the pandemic, reflecting increased attention to health as populations age and incomes rise as well as the growing need for people who can create, deploy, and maintain new technologies (Exhibit 3).

Given the expected concentration of job growth in high-wage occupations and declines in low-wage occupations, the scale and nature of workforce transitions required in the years ahead will be challenging, according to our research. Across the eight focus countries, more than 100 million workers, or 1 in 16, will need to find a different occupation by 2030 in our post-COVID-19 scenario, as shown in Exhibit 4. This is 12 percent more than we estimated before the pandemic, and up to 25 percent more in advanced economies (Exhibit 4).

 

Weinie

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Interesting... top tip: better reinforce the recruiting centres :)

The future of work after COVID-19​


We find that a markedly different mix of occupations may emerge after the pandemic across the eight economies. Compared to our pre-COVID-19 estimates, we expect the largest negative impact of the pandemic to fall on workers in food service and customer sales and service roles, as well as less-skilled office support roles. Jobs in warehousing and transportation may increase as a result of the growth in e-commerce and the delivery economy, but those increases are unlikely to offset the disruption of many low-wage jobs. In the United States, for instance, customer service and food service jobs could fall by 4.3 million, while transportation jobs could grow by nearly 800,000. Demand for workers in the healthcare and STEM occupations may grow more than before the pandemic, reflecting increased attention to health as populations age and incomes rise as well as the growing need for people who can create, deploy, and maintain new technologies (Exhibit 3).

Given the expected concentration of job growth in high-wage occupations and declines in low-wage occupations, the scale and nature of workforce transitions required in the years ahead will be challenging, according to our research. Across the eight focus countries, more than 100 million workers, or 1 in 16, will need to find a different occupation by 2030 in our post-COVID-19 scenario, as shown in Exhibit 4. This is 12 percent more than we estimated before the pandemic, and up to 25 percent more in advanced economies (Exhibit 4).

And we won't, because we are the CAF, and we know better. Sigh.
 

mariomike

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Demand for workers in the healthcare and STEM occupations may grow more than before the pandemic, reflecting increased attention to health as populations age and incomes rise as well as the growing need for people who can create, deploy, and maintain new technologies (Exhibit 3).
The Baby Boomer generation is aging. As it does so, all of those 'boomers' become net consumers of health care, driving up demand for services.

Simultaneously, all of those 'boomers' are reaching the end of their careers and retiring. Since subsequent generations are typically much smaller, there is difficulty in recruiting suitably trained replacement staff, just as demand for medical services is increasing.
 

CBH99

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Interesting... top tip: better reinforce the recruiting centres :)

The future of work after COVID-19​


We find that a markedly different mix of occupations may emerge after the pandemic across the eight economies. Compared to our pre-COVID-19 estimates, we expect the largest negative impact of the pandemic to fall on workers in food service and customer sales and service roles, as well as less-skilled office support roles. Jobs in warehousing and transportation may increase as a result of the growth in e-commerce and the delivery economy, but those increases are unlikely to offset the disruption of many low-wage jobs. In the United States, for instance, customer service and food service jobs could fall by 4.3 million, while transportation jobs could grow by nearly 800,000. Demand for workers in the healthcare and STEM occupations may grow more than before the pandemic, reflecting increased attention to health as populations age and incomes rise as well as the growing need for people who can create, deploy, and maintain new technologies (Exhibit 3).

Given the expected concentration of job growth in high-wage occupations and declines in low-wage occupations, the scale and nature of workforce transitions required in the years ahead will be challenging, according to our research. Across the eight focus countries, more than 100 million workers, or 1 in 16, will need to find a different occupation by 2030 in our post-COVID-19 scenario, as shown in Exhibit 4. This is 12 percent more than we estimated before the pandemic, and up to 25 percent more in advanced economies (Exhibit 4).

Between Covid spending, total lack of action on almost all mass employment projects, and a commercial real estate crash on the horizon. Should be fun times ahead 😈😉

I am curious to see just how many companies renew their leases, after setting everybody up to work remotely - and having had them work remotely for more than a year.

Company still functions, with significantly less overhead.

Interesting & somewhat dangerous times economically ahead.
 
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