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All things Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV)

brihard

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We had a town hall today at work and if and when we go back we were told we will not be going back to a pre pandemic work model.

My employer is looking at making work from home permanent where feasible- we have major issues with office space and a relatively new HQ that lacks the room for everything they want to put in it. A lot of our people can work remotely, with access as needed to shared work and meeting spaces. Some of us routinely work with sensitive material and need to come to the office, but that’s a small portion. I wouldn’t want to be heavily invested in office real estate.

My arm felt like I’d been hit by a truck. Could barely raise it above elbow height. Lasted the night then was fine in the morning. Was Pfizer.

I got Pfizer 2 fifteen minutes ago. Fingers crossed for tomorrow. I felt kinda gross after number one...
 

CBH99

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I JUST got Pfizer #2 about 20 minutes ago here, logged on and boom...you beat me to it. I didn't have a single issue with #1, so here's for hoping with #2
 

Weinie

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I JUST got Pfizer #2 about 20 minutes ago here, logged on and boom...you beat me to it. I didn't have a single issue with #1, so here's for hoping with #2
Got my second shot of Moderna on Tuesday. No problems at all. My wife got hers yesterday, chills all night, and feeling woozy.
 

Good2Golf

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Got my second shot of Moderna on Tuesday. No problems at all. My wife got hers yesterday, chills all night, and feeling woozy.
Proof, Weinie, that you have always been out standing in your own field......

😉
 

Jarnhamar

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My employer is looking at making work from home permanent where feasible- we have major issues with office space and a relatively new HQ that lacks the room for everything they want to put in it. A lot of our people can work remotely, with access as needed to shared work and meeting spaces. Some of us routinely work with sensitive material and need to come to the office, but that’s a small portion. I wouldn’t want to be heavily invested in office real estate.

I've seen a bunch of places move to a work-from-home model, I'm still on the fence if it's better or worse. In one call to VAC it sounded like the women was in the kitchen making lunch with the TV on in the background while talking to me. Other people are impossible to get a hold of. One DND member I was trying to reach had an out-of-office reply that they weren't answering the phone in the mornings because of homeschooling and only answering emails Wednesday from 0900-1200. Impossible to reach on the phone and didn't even have voice mail set up.

On the other hand..

Probably not happening as much civilian side but military wise I've heard a lot of complaints (and seen myself) that some CoC's will start messaging people early in the morning or well after supper. I've had a couple 8pm or later "Can you check something on monitor mass for me?" or similar texts. Working from home makes it a lot harder to leave work at work.
 

mariomike

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Probably not happening as much civilian side but military wise I've heard a lot of complaints (and seen myself) that some CoC's will start messaging people early in the morning or well after supper. I've had a couple 8pm or later "Can you check something on monitor mass for me?" or similar texts.
From what I have read on here, that sort of thing has been going on for years.
Working from home makes it a lot harder to leave work at work.
Has working from home made leaving work at work easier, or harder, ( when off duty )?
 

QV

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In depth on vaccines with Dr. Bridle. This is from February this year and it’s very lengthy. But if you wanted to learn more about vaccines specifically to our COVID situation, this is it.

One quote from near the end: “We’ll document this as the greatest mismanaged crisis of our time.”
 

medic5

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Here's a student's perspective on online learning, if anyone is interested.

For context I'm in the TDSB, Grade 10, in Virtual Secondary School which is the school that everyone who selected online learning in September 2020 got put in, roughly 20,000 students total. Anyone who picked online learning after the first quadmester still remained with their home school just in an online setting, whereas those who picked virtual school from the start were completely separated from their home school.

Most people I've talked to don't like online school at all, seems like the lack of social interaction seems to be a big part of it. The whole quadmester structure is rather hated too, one of my friends even wrote an opinion article in the Star about it here if anyone is interested.

I'm one of the few people that actually like online school, it is ridiculously easy and consumes no time whatsoever. I would guess as a Grade 10 student I'm getting probably 4 hours of instruction total per day, with maybe 30 minutes of work? Complete joke, much of the curriculum is not being taught at all. Attendance seems to be lacking, out of my class of 27, I've never seen more than 20 people in my class, mostly hovering around 15-17.

I don't even think it is right to call it a class, it really is more of just listening to your teacher talk for the whole period. No cameras, no required microphones, one could probably just join their class and go do something else and teachers would have no way to tell. Even with all this, course medians are roughly 5-10% lower than last year, at least from what I can see.
 

CBH99

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In depth on vaccines with Dr. Bridle. This is from February this year and it’s very lengthy. But if you wanted to learn more about vaccines specifically to our COVID situation, this is it.

One quote from near the end: “We’ll document this as the greatest mismanaged crisis of our time.”
Probably a fair statement. And unfortunately (or fortunately, depending on one's perspective) - the finger absolutely can't be pointed in one direction, or at one particular decision-making body, as I personally believe the crisis was mismanaged from the very start.

In that statement, I don't mean the WHO. (Although I am absolutely not letting them off the hook, but in regards to this post.)


This crisis was mismanaged in several ways, but hopefully we can consider it an excellent learning opportunity.

We now have a very good understanding of what lockdowns do, and do not, accomplish. We have learned lessons about being able to quickly study the molecular structure of a virus using scientific methods never previously available, and being able to design/test/distribute mass vaccines to combat the new threat. Etc, etc.

We have also been sharply reminded that the media is there to sell advertising space, in order to generate income. It is not there to give you the unbiased, cold facts as we all believed (at one point in our lives) that their only interest was in accurately informing the public. We've been reminded that the media does present a very real potential danger to the public when it chooses to use a situation such as this to distribute misinformation, and can be an excellent ally if they choose to keep things as accurate as possible.

We've also been reminded that stable jobs aren't necessarily as stable as you think they are, and stable investments aren't anywhere near as stable as one may think. (Commercial real estate sector, feel free to crash on que).


A mismanaged crisis? Absolutely. Partially unavoidable, due to the new nature of a virus we hadn't previously been exposed to. But the absolute stupidity of our political leaders absolutely contributed to the crisis getting worse before it got better, and prolonging it. (Just my humble opinion.)

But, like I said - mismanaged crisis? Yes. Learning opportunity? Yes. Hopefully the next time something happens like this, it will be handled with the lessons from this crisis learned and already applied.

0.02
 

PMedMoe

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In depth on vaccines with Dr. Bridle. This is from February this year and it’s very lengthy. But if you wanted to learn more about vaccines specifically to our COVID situation, this is it.
If Dr Bridle would rather have natural immunity, then he is free to go out and get COVID. I'll take the vaccine.

And as for your source, Dryburgh.com, all I can say is :ROFLMAO: :ROFLMAO: :ROFLMAO:

"Lee S. Dryburgh is a person-to-person communications technologist." Whatever that means.

Lee S. Dryburgh
 
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Remius

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I’m not sure that the term person to person communications technologist is made up.

I am in no way lending any credence to that site, but Mr. Dryburgh seems to have an engineering background in telecommunications and specialises in person to person communications like mobile and cell phones. And has done some work with major telcos.
 

PMedMoe

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I’m not sure that the term person to person communications technologist is made up.

I am in no way lending any credence to that site, but Mr. Dryburgh seems to have an engineering background in telecommunications and specialises in person to person communications like mobile and cell phones. And has done some work with major telcos.
I'm not saying his job title is made up, but he's not the person whose website I'd go to for COVID/vaccine info.
 

Remius

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I'm not saying his job title is made up, but he's not the person whose website I'd go to for COVID/vaccine info.
I don’t disagree. But we can still be careful about people’s qualifications. In fact those things are very important when looking at the veracity and or credibility of people making certain claims.
 

Jarnhamar

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Dr. Byram Bridle is a vaccine expert (Associate Professor of Viral Immunology) whose lab research into vaccines has been supported by the Canadian government. Even if he's on InfoWars or MadTV he probably has relevant info to speak to.
 

mariomike

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Bloggers are entertaining, if they are one's preferred source of news, I suppose.

Guess I'm old-fashioned, but I wonder how many Canadians still actually subscribe to a newspaper?
 

PMedMoe

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Dr. Byram Bridle is a vaccine expert (Associate Professor of Viral Immunology) whose lab research into vaccines has been supported by the Canadian government. Even if he's on InfoWars or MadTV he probably has relevant info to speak to.
He does a very good job of explaining the vaccines and how they work. And then he loses credibility (with me) by going on to say "There was no way that we would reasonably have good, well-vetted COVID-19 vaccines available now and available within a year from the beginning of the pandemic." and "COVID-19 vaccines have reached the public rollout phase by, and I’ll say it in quotes, 'cutting corners'."

And THB, I do appreciate his criticism of the vaccine rollout.
 
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