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All things Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV)

lenaitch

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I know people, educated professionals, who believe in the micro-chip conspiracy theory and will not get vaccinated. Seriously.

These are also people who think that all doctors are idiots (they know way more about medical stuff) and as long as they pay attention to everything they learned about 'gut biome' and genetic editing in those last podcasts they listened to, they'll be fine. At least one of them has been 'cancelled' by their doctor because they won't follow the doctor's orders, of course.

I try to avoid standing too close to these people, but we can still make fun of them:


Is this a microchip off the old block situation?


People have it all wrong. It's not microchips . . . it's people. There are entire invading armies floating around in our veins waiting to sproing.

Fantastic-Voyage-1966-sci-fi-fantasty-adventure-Proteus-ship.jpg
(Fantastic Voyage)

😁
 

daftandbarmy

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That's an interesting snowball. At least Canada isn't right in the bull's eye....


Visualizing the Snowball of Government Debt in 2021​


As we approach the second half of 2021, many countries around the world are beginning to relax their COVID-19 restrictions.


And while this signals a return to normalcy for much of the global economy, there’s one subject that’s likely to remain controversial: government debt.


To see how each country is faring in the aftermath of an unprecedented global borrowing spree, this graphic from HowMuch.net visualizes debt-to-GDP ratios using April 2021 data from the International Monetary Fund (IMF).



1622751687202.png




 

CBH99

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Conspiracy theory time!! (Your welcome, and I'm sorry)

Honest question, curious to hear the variety of answers that possibly come up.



National debt for most countries has always been sky-high, and every year, most countries end up in more & more debt. Covid-19 amplified that enormously, to the tune that most countries will now have a deficit in the hundreds of billions of dollars (just this year alone.)

Question - does anybody else feel like the global 'system' works in such a way that countries are supposed to be in debt?

Also, I personally find it 'puzzling' when people talk about the subject of an increasing national debt. People often say "If we don't curb spending, our kids will be paying for this debt!"

a) Will they though? Canada has had a hefty debt ever since I was born, and I don't feel like I've personally had to pay any of it off. I pay taxes, which in turn pays for essentials such as police, healthcare, paved roads, government services, etc etc. I feel like I would be paying these taxes regardless of whether Canada had a large national debt or not.

b) Even if we stopped spending one extra cent of money we don't have, how on earth would we begin to pay down hundreds of billions of debt?


I'm not a crazy conspiracy theorist, but...I have a weird feeling in the back of my mind that this money will NEVER be repaid, hence why governments all over the world don't mind borrowing/spending it. 🤷‍♂️

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PMedMoe

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Mods, can we split this off into another thread (if deemed necessary)?
 

Brad Sallows

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b) Even if we stopped spending one extra cent of money we don't have, how on earth would we begin to pay down hundreds of billions of debt?

Balanced budget, inflation, and time. People tolerate inflation better than they tolerate deflation, so the people concerned with managing these things aim for a small range of inflation. Over time, it erodes the value of debt. (Canada's accumulated deficit was about $20B in 1970 - how long would it take us to pay that off now?) So stop deficit spending (or minimize it below rate of revenue growth), and be patient.

The COVID-induced economic problems are not a textbook case of recession. Notwithstanding the necessity of pushing money out the door to fill in the gaps for people and businesses in dire straits and provide for other extraordinary demands, many people have continued working without spending (as much). There is a large amount of accumulated income held by the people of most (certainly most of the advanced) nations. As COVID restrictions ease, spending will accelerate. Since people will be returning to work, or starting new work to take advantage of that increasing spending, production will rise. But if production doesn't rise fast enough to soak up spending (if supply grows more slowly than demand), price inflation may (should) result.

Governments will be (have been, are) looking at ways to use COVID as an excuse to do other things on their honey-do lists. For the rest of us, it's worth thinking about things we did during COVID that would be useful permanent habits, and spending a little money disaster-proofing ourselves.
 

daftandbarmy

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Balanced budget, inflation, and time. People tolerate inflation better than they tolerate deflation, so the people concerned with managing these things aim for a small range of inflation. Over time, it erodes the value of debt. (Canada's accumulated deficit was about $20B in 1970 - how long would it take us to pay that off now?) So stop deficit spending (or minimize it below rate of revenue growth), and be patient.

The COVID-induced economic problems are not a textbook case of recession. Notwithstanding the necessity of pushing money out the door to fill in the gaps for people and businesses in dire straits and provide for other extraordinary demands, many people have continued working without spending (as much). There is a large amount of accumulated income held by the people of most (certainly most of the advanced) nations. As COVID restrictions ease, spending will accelerate. Since people will be returning to work, or starting new work to take advantage of that increasing spending, production will rise. But if production doesn't rise fast enough to soak up spending (if supply grows more slowly than demand), price inflation may (should) result.

Governments will be (have been, are) looking at ways to use COVID as an excuse to do other things on their honey-do lists. For the rest of us, it's worth thinking about things we did during COVID that would be useful permanent habits, and spending a little money disaster-proofing ourselves.

And, post pandemic, demand for Canada's raw materials will skyrocket. We're already making record revenues from timber etc.

I assume the economists et al have done the arithmetic on that and, as a result, are less worried than they might be otherwise.
 

CBH99

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For those who have only had their first dose, I would recommend getting their 2nd as soon as possible. (I had my second dose of Pfizer last week, haven’t had any reactions to either dose.)

Our “closed border” that still allows dozens of international flights to land each day, and has allowed since this all began — has done a predictable job of keeping foreign variants out.

(Even with a GIGANTIC moat around the country, ocean sized... the government still somehow couldn’t actually close the border... 😫🤦🏼‍♂️)
 

CBH99

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Question - is there any difference between the first and second dose, if both doses are the same vaccine?

Is volume injected different? Any tweaks that make them each distinct?
 

Blackadder1916

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Question - is there any difference between the first and second dose, if both doses are the same vaccine?

Is volume injected different? Any tweaks that make them each distinct?

Exactly the same. But needing two (or more) initial doses of a vaccine to achieve best available protection is not unusual. Just a quick look through my yellow book reminds me of the three doses of rabies vaccine and a couple of varieties of hepatitis vaccines and a few other odd ones that needed two doses in the initial series not to mention the boosters that were needed at varying times. Covid-19 vaccine may likely slide into the same category as flu vaccines, recommended for yearly booster. The business plans of most of the big pharmaceutical players are already counting on that for growth; there are a few that are developing combined flu/covid products.
 

ModlrMike

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My daughter and I were talking about this a few weeks ago. She opined that at some point, we may have an annual "Fluvid" vaccine.
 

RangerRay

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A long but interesting article on how the lab leak theory was dismissed and now gaining steam again.

From one of the more “progressive” outlets so it can’t be excused as fluffing for nationalists and other bigots.

 

CBH99

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Clearly I am no virologist, and have no academic background in anything related to the field. My opinion is just my own humble, admittedly uneducated.

But the lab-leak theory is what I, and most of my social circle, assumed when this whole thing first began.


What sounds more believable?

- A sample of this virus escaped from the lab in Wuhan. Not deliberately, but it did. Perhaps it somehow survived decontamination, or perhaps a worker was just complacent & skipped a step. But somehow, a sample of the virus escaped the lab, and rapidly spread among the population.

- Some guy bought a bat, and consumed it as part of a meal. And instead of him getting a stomach virus, or something in the intestines, it somehow ended up in his lungs - went airborne whenever he spoke or breathed - and subsequently, millions upon millions of people died. Shut the entire world down.


Again, I’m not a scientist. But the idea that a sample of this somehow escaped the lab (which conveniently studied coronaviruses) is probably the theory I feel like the media should have initially ran with.

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Bruce Monkhouse

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That anyone who even dare suggest that it might have came from the lab was vilified in the press just goes to show the absolute control the CCP has on our way of communication.

Colour me shallow but I am taking lots of satisfaction hearing the dead quiet coming from some folks on social platforms. Quick to call people racist to suit their position, but not so quick to puree that crow so the beaks and claws are easier to swallow.
 

CBH99

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That anyone who even dare suggest that it might have came from the lab was vilified in the press just goes to show the absolute control the CCP has on our way of communication.
Not trying to derail this mods, as I know a lot of the chatter about Covid origins could easily end up in the China thread.

But how does the CCP control our national media? Why would CBC, Global, etc ‘go with the narrative they are told to’ when it comes to China? China doesn’t fund their budgets?

(Actually asking — I have no doubt you are correct. I’m just trying to piece it into the bigger picture)



I don’t understand why the media vilified anybody who suggested it escaped from the lab nearby which - conveniently enough - studied coronaviruses. It’s certainly a reasonable theory that deserved to be investigated.
It isn’t racist or inappropriate to question its origin, or suggest an alternative when the origin story is perhaps the less likely option. A virus that has killed this many people, affected several times more, and completely changed the picture of many families, businesses - affected the education timeline of millions of students, etc etc.

Asking reasonable questions is never a bad thing. I feel it’s scary, frustrating, and quite telling when an entity (the CCP) throws the racism card when asked a question it doesn’t like.
 

Brad Sallows

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But the idea that a sample of this somehow escaped the lab (which conveniently studied coronaviruses) is probably the theory I feel like the media should have initially ran with.

For outbreaks, the prudent way to bet is natural origin. But everyone's thinking was inflected by the existence of President Donald J Trump, so natural origin couldn't merely be the overwhelmingly likely hypothesis, it had to be the only one. So as the balance of probabilities of the competing two hypotheses (natural:lab) has shifted from, say, 99:1 to something closer to parity or to a preponderance on the other side, some of the early absolutism looks particularly bad, especially that which came from people who are supposed to be objective or are supposed to be in the business of providing information.
 

Remius

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For outbreaks, the prudent way to bet is natural origin. But everyone's thinking was inflected by the existence of President Donald J Trump, so natural origin couldn't merely be the overwhelmingly likely hypothesis, it had to be the only one. So as the balance of probabilities of the competing two hypotheses (natural:lab) has shifted from, say, 99:1 to something closer to parity or to a preponderance on the other side, some of the early absolutism looks particularly bad, especially that which came from people who are supposed to be objective or are supposed to be in the business of providing information.
No doubt that people’s distrust in the former president had a part to play as well as that side’s politisation of COVID. He flipped flopped so many times it isn’t a wonder. Going from praise to outright belligerence with them. The last two sars outbreaks were natural in origin so following the normal pattern it would seem logical. However given China’s track record on transparency it could and should have been assumed that maybe a lab leak is a possibility. The issue also gets muddled with the yet unproven proposition that it was purposefully released.
 
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