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All things Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV)

OldSolduer

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He was given a 30 day jail sentence. He appealed that sentence. His appeal was tossed out. He’ll do thirty days in jail, and will definitely lose his job- something I’m sure the judge was live to in sentencing.
30 days actually is about 21 days, dependent on which province sentences you.
 

dapaterson

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Most provincial police acts have no continuing liability provisions. Officers retire the day before their hearing and avoid any professional sanction.

Continuing liability is needed - retirement should be no escape.
 

lenaitch

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Is it because of covid or is it normal for it to take 2 years to carry out a sentence?



Hopefully, and hopefully he wasn't getting paid this whole time.
No, it's pretty normal in Ontario, particularly in the GTA and particularly when an appeal is involved.

According to the Police Services Act (Ontario), he would be paid up to the point that he was originally given the custodial sentence (notwithstanding the appeal). The previous government proposed changes that did not survive the change of government. The current government has passed changes that would allow a chief to suspend w/o pay under certain conditions but they have not received Royal Assent - for something like three years.
 

daftandbarmy

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Sorry all; went down a rabbit hole and side tracked.

Its nice to see the CAF moving forward with remedial measures for non compliant members for vaccinations.

Episode 5 GIF by The Simpsons
 

lenaitch

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Most provincial police acts have no continuing liability provisions. Officers retire the day before their hearing and avoid any professional sanction.

Continuing liability is needed - retirement should be no escape.
I get what you are saying but it is basically employment law, and once that linkage is severed, I'm not sure what disciplinary sanction could be imposed. You can't fire them, dock their pay or rank - they're already gone. Criminal liability remains.
 

dapaterson

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CAF members remain liable for their conduct after release. No reason police could not also be held to that standard.

As I recall, there were amendments to te Ontario Police Act that would have made officers liable after retirement; the current Ontario government cancelled regulations to bring those provisions into force, and I believe also repealed that legislation.

Disciplinary sanctions are not only for those punished, but also for the communities of both LEOs and civilians to reinforce behaviours.
 

mariomike

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Are you ok with it?
Reuters, yes.

I know I'm old-fashioned with my newspaper subscription. Opinions varied. But, at least people used to agree on the facts.

Where do you find things like New Tang Dynasty?
 

Booter

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QV- I think that time line is bizarre. But I see that they plan on vetting 330 thousand documents.

500 a month seems light-maybe 2000 a month is more reasonable. But I don’t know the complexity of this kindve stuff.

But I read that and see a process not designed for the volume not someone trying to bury something.

Maybe if I knew the timelines of similar amounts with similar complexity I could be more concerned.
 

mariomike

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Saw this over in Kyle's thread.

There’s 36 thousand Nypd officers. They can absorb that loss

When asked if the department has had to move shifts around due to officers being placed on unpaid leave, ( NYPD Commissioner Dermot Shea ) said "no we really haven't...it's really status quo."

Same with FDNY firefighters and paramedics.

All units are staffed, medical leave has returned to normal levels, response times have not increased, and the Department is continuing to respond to all fire/medical calls that come our way,” FDNY Commissioner Daniel A. Nigro.

North of the border, in North America's fourth largest city - including Mexico City - response times remain unchanged with firefighters and paramedics. Suspensions began on 31 Oct. and termination on 13 Dec.
 

brihard

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Saw this over in Kyle's thread.





Same with FDNY firefighters and paramedics.



North of the border, in North America's fourth largest city - including Mexico City - response times remain unchanged with firefighters and paramedics. Suspensions began on 31 Oct. and termination on 13 Dec.

There’s been minimal if any impact among emergency services here. It’s been a very small albeit vocal minority kicking up a fuss; operations have carried on. Most of the gnashing of teeth from that small group has already faded. Some have quietly gotten vaccinated and gone back to work. A few have put in early retirements. A very scant few may make a fight of it, but that will basically just mean their pay stops and an LWOP entry gets paid in the system. Some have gone on sick leave to stave it off, that will only carry them for so long before other mechanisms kick in.

Most police, firefighters, and paramedics also like things like restaurants, concerts, sports events, and concerts anyway. Even well before any of these restrictions came into play, when we were offered vaccine clinics, uptake was enthusiastic and widespread.
 

mariomike

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There’s been minimal if any impact among emergency services here. It’s been a very small albeit vocal minority kicking up a fuss; operations have carried on. Most of the gnashing of teeth from that small group has already faded. Some have quietly gotten vaccinated and gone back to work. A few have put in early retirements. A very scant few may make a fight of it, but that will basically just mean their pay stops and an LWOP entry gets paid in the system. Some have gone on sick leave to stave it off, that will only carry them for so long before other mechanisms kick in.

Most police, firefighters, and paramedics also like things like restaurants, concerts, sports events, and concerts anyway. Even well before any of these restrictions came into play, when we were offered vaccine clinics, uptake was enthusiastic and widespread.
As a retired person, I appreciate the police officers, firefighters and paramedics who complied with the vaccine mandate. They stepped up and prevented a staffing crisis.

They are supporting their fellow members and the public they swore an oath to serve.
 
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