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Canadian Federal Election 44 - Sep 2021

Altair

Army.ca Fixture
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I have met a lot of people like that. Some people are sitting on a lot of wealth as i see houses bought all around me for 4-5 times what i paid and then doing 60-100 thou in reno's. But there are a lot of decent people out there that live paycheck to paycheck as inflation has stripped away their buying power.
Most people my around my age, 25-35, wish they could buy one house. Never mind multiple houses.

And it's not inflation, it's outright speculation and lack of supply.

I hope that the parties address this someday soon.
 

brihard

Army.ca Fixture
Mentor
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4,486
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Housing is utterly fucking bananas. Anyone who’s already had their house for more than ten years should probably sit down. My wife and I are double professional income, no kids as of yet. With the assistance of an inheritance borne of some awful circumstances, we were fortunate to get into the market young. Many of my friends are priced out of that (including a number of serving CAF NCMs, incidentally). The absurd increase in housing costs in markets such as Ottawa, Halifax etc is leaving a lot of people behind. Townhouses here are going for $650k plus. Think of what it takes in income to qualify for that mortgage.

So people struggling with shelter costs are also having to look at the costs of childcare, and in a lot of cases can’t really take the hit. They’re caught in the rent trap on two modest incomes, hoping that years from now they may be able to buy a small starter condo. Hardly any room for kids there, of course.

We have a fertility rate crisis. It’s not yet desperate here, but it’s also a very slow ship to reverse course on. Against that we have a large aging population with pensions and social benefits to keep solvent. The only solution to that is more labour force growth. There are options of course.

EB2D126B-8BB6-439E-A305-113A892039FC.jpeg
 

MilEME09

Army.ca Fixture
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3,550
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Most people my around my age, 25-35, wish they could buy one house. Never mind multiple houses.

And it's not inflation, it's outright speculation and lack of supply.

I hope that the parties address this someday soon.
Inflation is a huge factor, both inside and out of the housing market. Outside the market food prices have jumped 30% in the past couple years, feeding a family of 4 on a single income is near impossible these days.

Inside the housing market prices have steadily increased over the past 60 years. Over the course of the past 16 years my mothets home has increased in value 60k without any major work being put into it.

You combine this with the stress test people have to do now and a lot of people are out of the market.
 

Quirky

Sr. Member
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652
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940
Housing is utterly fucking bananas. Anyone who’s already had their house for more than ten years should probably sit down. My wife and I are double professional income, no kids as of yet. With the assistance of an inheritance borne of some awful circumstances, we were fortunate to get into the market young. Many of my friends are priced out of that (including a number of serving CAF NCMs, incidentally). The absurd increase in housing costs in markets such as Ottawa, Halifax etc is leaving a lot of people behind. Townhouses here are going for $650k plus. Think of what it takes in income to qualify for that mortgage.

There are still places in Canada where you can afford a nice house, however those places have little well paying jobs. Wife and I are in same boat, two very well paying jobs but no kids. People like us are essentially paying for social programs for the flood of immigrants or lower-income families with 3-5 kids. It pays to be poor in Canada under NDP/Liberal governments. Can’t wait until it all comes crashing down.

Why don’t you just have rich parents with an inheritance?
 

brihard

Army.ca Fixture
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There are still places in Canada where you can afford a nice house, however those places have little well paying jobs. Wife and I are in same boat, two very well paying jobs but no kids. People like us are essentially paying for social programs for the flood of immigrants or lower-income families with 3-5 kids. It pays to be poor in Canada under NDP/Liberal governments. Can’t wait until it all comes crashing down.

Why don’t you just have rich parents with an inheritance?
Those immigrants’ 3-5 kids will be getting educated, finding jobs, and ultimately keeping our CPP and pensions solvent.
 

Brad Sallows

Army.ca Fixture
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Ponzi social programs are best fixed by applying the third choice: reform (remove) the underlying ponzi structure.

More people means more accommodation needed. More energy needed. More natural resources. More pressure on the species inhabiting popular recreational lands and waters. More pressure on species in our food chain. More new kinds of jobs (not just new jobs) needed, because the resource / finishing / service economy period inverted over the past century and only a few of those "more people" will be needed in the bottom two tiers, leaving the rest to have to figure out what else people want in addition to a gourmet coffee bar on every corner. (They'll be fighting the eco-conscious crowd every step of the way, because consumption habits are at the root of most problems greens want to fix.)

Provinces must have the power to gut local zoning restrictions that block increased housing density; the feds I doubt have any. The feds do have the power to relocate facilities into the fringes of suburbia, and see whether they have to do it again in another 50 years. Maybe not if they fix the ponzi programs to remove the excuse for higher birth and immigration rates. Feds and provinces do have the power to legislate to remove/reduce obstructionism against new infrastructure.

If you want both population increase and more affordable housing, you're SOL until someone comes along willing to break a lot of the models for where people live and work.
 

RedFive

Member
Subscriber
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147
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630
Housing is utterly fucking bananas. Anyone who’s already had their house for more than ten years should probably sit down. My wife and I are double professional income, no kids as of yet. With the assistance of an inheritance borne of some awful circumstances, we were fortunate to get into the market young. Many of my friends are priced out of that (including a number of serving CAF NCMs, incidentally). The absurd increase in housing costs in markets such as Ottawa, Halifax etc is leaving a lot of people behind. Townhouses here are going for $650k plus. Think of what it takes in income to qualify for that mortgage.

So people struggling with shelter costs are also having to look at the costs of childcare, and in a lot of cases can’t really take the hit. They’re caught in the rent trap on two modest incomes, hoping that years from now they may be able to buy a small starter condo. Hardly any room for kids there, of course.

We have a fertility rate crisis. It’s not yet desperate here, but it’s also a very slow ship to reverse course on. Against that we have a large aging population with pensions and social benefits to keep solvent. The only solution to that is more labour force growth. There are options of course.

Same here. Two income household, no kids. Four years into our careers where the RCMP sent us (both members), the townhouse we rent was assessed at $850k but the last one of this floorplan to sell in the complex we're in went for $925k despite being five years old. Despite saving every cent we've been able to, as well as removing debts we brought into the relationship a home is beyond our means. We can't even afford the down payment on the place we're renting...

The raise we got should help a little, but we're still highly paid professionals and home ownership is outside of our reach for now, how is everybody else making do?
 

Altair

Army.ca Fixture
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Same here. Two income household, no kids. Four years into our careers where the RCMP sent us (both members), the townhouse we rent was assessed at $850k but the last one of this floorplan to sell in the complex we're in went for $925k despite being five years old. Despite saving every cent we've been able to, as well as removing debts we brought into the relationship a home is beyond our means. We can't even afford the down payment on the place we're renting...

The raise we got should help a little, but we're still highly paid professionals and home ownership is outside of our reach for now, how is everybody else making do?
I'm a single income family, imagine how that works...

Like ive said previously, I had some good investments, without that I would be nowhere close.
 

RedFive

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I'm a single income family, imagine how that works...

Like ive said previously, I had some good investments, without that I would be nowhere close.
I can't, which I suppose is really my point. Not even ten years ago I'd have the house, two vehicles, a wedding paid for, two newer vehicles for us to drive and be thinking about popping out some kids. Right now? I'm still paying student debt and a car loan, my better half is fortunately debt free, but we just cant save fast enough to make the down payment. A wedding that's more than a civil ceremony, a single family house, kids to put in that house or even a toy or two to put into the garage is so far out of our grasp right now it's frustrating and depressing.

On the other hand, my parent's house is the only hope they have of a retirement thanks to awful or non-existent pensions. Lots of savings, but as inflation goes up and value goes down, their life savings are worth less and less. I don't have a solution, I'm just frustrated and angry with the situation.
 

Brad Sallows

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There are many answers to "how do others do it". But for the first problem, accumulating a down payment, it all comes down to gross savings rate. What is the guideline for mortgage payments in Canada now - maximum 28% of gross income? Serious home seekers have to be hitting that number at least and I suppose should be targeting more if working on a down payment. Minimizing rent cost in the meantime is the challenge.

Car ownership can be a real sink. I've owned 8 vehicles over my 40 adult years; including the ex's contributions, the total purchases prices sum up to somewhere between $50K and $60K (one was purchased new). I'm sure I managed to not spend a lot on cars; I know people who drop almost that much on one car.

Part of the problem is how homes are built now. There are some places where the underlying land is so expensive that the construction cost is fractionally less important, but no question that a rectangular 1600 sq ft box with one roofline, an unfinished basement, and a carport is cheaper than 2400 sq ft with bay windows, fake gables, well-appointed interior trim and finishings, and a two- or even three-bay enclosed garage.

The chief problem is simple: more people, same amount of land. Pick any major city, find old skyline pictures and compare to now.
 

Quirky

Sr. Member
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Those immigrants’ 3-5 kids will be getting educated, finding jobs, and ultimately keeping our CPP and pensions solvent.
Now much taxes could the government possibly collect from Uber drivers, sandwich artists and hotel maids? Better off on welfare.
 

SeaKingTacco

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Now much taxes could the government possibly collect from Uber drivers, sandwich artists and hotel maids? Better off on welfare.
You are missing the point. Those people keep other people in business, too. They work hard and do jobs that people born in Canada won’t do anymore. It is a canard that immigrants steal jobs. They contribute as much or more to Canadian society than most others.

I am conservative by nature, but I am foursquare in favour of immigration.
 

Altair

Army.ca Fixture
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Now much taxes could the government possibly collect from Uber drivers, sandwich artists and hotel maids? Better off on welfare.

You ever get tired of looking dumb and uneducated or are you the captain america of ignorance, and can do this all day?

  • The lion’s share (66%) of national employment gains between 2016 and 2017 was accounted for by immigrants of core working-age (25 to 54 years) and Canadian-born workers aged 55 and older.
  • The unemployment rate for core-aged immigrants edged down to 6.4% in 2017, the lowest rate since the start of the LFS immigrant series in 2006. At the same time, their employment rate rose to 78.9%, the highest rate recorded during the 12-year period. In comparison, the employment rate for the Canadian-born was 84.0% in 2017, up 0.8 percentage points from the previous year, and their unemployment rate was 5.0%, down 0.5 points.
  • The employment-rate gap between immigrants and the Canadian-born narrowed for three consecutive years, after increasing in 2014. The gap in 2017 was the lowest since 2006 (start of the series). At the same time, the unemployment-rate gap was stable in 2017, but narrower than it was in 2014.
  • The largest share of the immigrant employment increase from 2016 to 2017 was accounted for by those who had been in the country for more than 10 years (established immigrants). However, over one-third (35%) of this increase was attributable to very recent immigrants (in Canada for 5 years or less).
  • Immigrants in British Columbia and Ontario accounted for the bulk of immigrant employment growth in 2017.
  • Most of the growth in immigrant employment was in professional, scientific and technical services; finance, insurance, real estate and leasing services; manufacturing as well as health care and social assistance.
  • For university-educated immigrants, employment increased between 2016 and 2017, mainly in full-time work and among those who were established (in the country for more than 10 years). For the university-educated, Canadian-born, employment also increased, pushing up their employment rate to 91.4%, the highest level since 2006. Employment gains for university-educated immigrants helped lift their employment rate to a record high of 82.1% in 2017. Consequently, the gap between them and their Canadian-born counterparts narrowed to its smallest size since 2006.
  • Core-aged immigrants born in the Philippines continued to have the highest employment rate of all immigrant groups, even higher than the Canadian-born, followed by immigrants born in Europe.
  • African-born immigrants had the lowest employment rate and highest unemployment rate of all immigrant groups, and these rates’ differentials with the Canadian-born were particularly high for the African-born who had been in Canada for 5 years or less.
 

brihard

Army.ca Fixture
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Now much taxes could the government possibly collect from Uber drivers, sandwich artists and hotel maids? Better off on welfare.

Thing is, when you uber between shifts as a sandwich artist, and your wife works as a hotel maid when not pulling shifts as a PSW, and between the two of you you hammer solid work ethic into the four kids and send them off to school, Canada ends up gaining a nurse, a computer scientist, a daycare owner-operator, and an electrician out of the equation. Your shallow, petty, and casual racism aside, Canada’s experience with immigrants has overall been a pretty positive one. They end up making really good Canadians. More to the point, as I said, we need them. Your inability or unwillingness to look past the immediate few years at a time doesn’t change that truth.
 

Bruce Monkhouse

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Now much taxes could the government possibly collect from Uber drivers, sandwich artists and hotel maids? Better off on welfare.


You ever get tired of looking dumb and uneducated or are you the captain america of ignorance, and can do this all day?

That'll be enough from you two between the racism and the personal attacks. There are lots of scummy forums out there for this kife, we are not one of them.
Thank you,
Bruce
 

YZT580

Army.ca Veteran
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930
We've been over this as well, society decides what services it provides.
You have been over it, not we. Just because you write it doesn't etch it in stone. Try listening (to be grammatically correct, try reading) what other people are patiently trying to explain to you as their take on things and accept the truth that yours is not the only opinion. Sarcasm and caustic comments discourage others from participating in the discussion 'cause they feel it isn't worth the effort corresponding with a brick wall.
 

brihard

Army.ca Fixture
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This.

Between a fourth COVID wave, BC on fire and a FUBAR situation in getting our allies out of Afghanistan, and this “minority” government being a de facto majority, this is the most unnecessary election ever
Yup. I’ve voted Liberal before. Sure as hell not this time.
 
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