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Canadian Federal Election 44 - Sep 2021

Altair

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The wedges work, look at this thread. It should not be ridiculous that someone can both be pro-choice, but also be willing to stand up for someone's freedom not to be.
Once you allow a professional the freedom to deny services, you run into the situation where in places where there are not a lot of choices you have effectively banned it.
 

Altair

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This, 100%
Yeah, and it's a 100 percent a own goal by the CPC.

If I can easily articulate that in one long sentence, or one short paragraph, then the LPC war room is going to have a field day with it.
 

mariomike

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In many rural and remote areas, a denial of referral could equal a denial of care.
Which might not go over well with rural voters.
For being rural who have to deal with shitty conditions, dispersed residents and long drives to essential facilities, as you stated, these folks will ALWAYS cost more per person and be far less "monetarily efficient"

I vote those who consider an entire province and balance those requirements vice catering to the TO populace at the expense of all others.

That's for Ontario elections. But, may also apply to federal, if rural voters feel threatened with the possibilbity of "a denial of care."
 

Haggis

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At the rate they are going, and with the PPC likely to split the vote yet again, O'Toole should just call Trudeau and concede the election and save $500 M which Blair can now put towards his compensated gun confiscation. It'll be interesting to see how much real "opposition" the NDP bring to the House.
 

PuckChaser

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PPC are polling below 2% nationally, they're not splitting the vote. They were irrelevant in 2019 and their votes to CPC wouldn't have turned any seats Blue. A strong NDP is more of a threat to the LPC, however. Expect Trudeau to start trying to outflank the hard left again soon.
 

Altair

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PPC are polling below 2% nationally, they're not splitting the vote. They were irrelevant in 2019 and their votes to CPC wouldn't have turned any seats Blue. A strong NDP is more of a threat to the LPC, however. Expect Trudeau to start trying to outflank the hard left again soon.
Poll tracker has the PPC at 3.4 nationally and 338 has them at 2.6

Numbers, if accurate, the CPC would love to have.
 

brihard

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PPC are polling below 2% nationally, they're not splitting the vote. They were irrelevant in 2019 and their votes to CPC wouldn't have turned any seats Blue. A strong NDP is more of a threat to the LPC, however. Expect Trudeau to start trying to outflank the hard left again soon.
Not accurate. I got curious and dumped the 2019 numbers into a spreadsheet. If recollection serves, there were six seats won by the Liberals where the margin between LPC and CPC was smaller than PPC’s total votes; ie, had most PPC votes gone CPC (a logical supposition), CPC would have taken the seats. This wouldn’t have impacted the parliamentary balance of power at all.

That said, a real possibility this time around is that Bernier’s tantrum may well split just enough on the right to have a profound impact on Parliament. Or it could mean nothing at all. I obviously hope the latter- parliamentary irrelevance is, IMHO, what Bernier deserves. It would be quite the own goal if they won no seats but sealed the deal for the LPC.
 

MilEME09

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Poll tracker has the PPC at 3.4 nationally and 338 has them at 2.6

Numbers, if accurate, the CPC would love to have.
Liberals should be more worried about 28% bloc support.

2.6% nationally isn't a huge threat, divided up across the country, those numbers aren't enough to swing any ridings.
 

brihard

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Liberals should be more worried about 28% bloc support.

2.6% nationally isn't a huge threat, divided up across the country, those numbers aren't enough to swing any ridings.
Oh, I don’t imagine the LPC are worried about PPC at all. If anything, they’re very quietly rooting for them.
 

PuckChaser

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Not accurate. I got curious and dumped the 2019 numbers into a spreadsheet. If recollection serves, there were six seats won by the Liberals where the margin between LPC and CPC was smaller than PPC’s total votes; ie, had most PPC votes gone CPC (a logical supposition), CPC would have taken the seats. This wouldn’t have impacted the parliamentary balance of power at all.

That said, a real possibility this time around is that Bernier’s tantrum may well split just enough on the right to have a profound impact on Parliament. Or it could mean nothing at all. I obviously hope the latter- parliamentary irrelevance is, IMHO, what Bernier deserves. It would be quite the own goal if they won no seats but sealed the deal for the LPC.
You're assuming every PPC vote is taken from CPC, where some of those folks are Libertarians seeing a more viable Federal Party. I use viable in the loosest possible context, considering their candidates are photoshopping themselves into photos to use as their official election photo:

PPC Candidate, Vahid Seyfaie, Photoshopped His Head On To Prince William's Body For His Official Election Photos And I Can't Stop Laughing — Dean Blundell's Sports, News, Podcast Network
 

Altair

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Liberals should be more worried about 28% bloc support.

2.6% nationally isn't a huge threat, divided up across the country, those numbers aren't enough to swing any ridings.
28 percent is less than what the bloc got in 2019. The LPC, according to poll tracker, is at 36 percent.

The LPC need to win 15 more seats to get to 170, and if they can sneak a few off the bloc and few in Ontario, and anything
more than the zero they got in Saskatchewan and Alberta they are well on their way.

Oh, I don’t imagine the LPC are worried about PPC at all. If anything, they’re very quietly rooting for them.
I did vote for them last election, and likely will this election as well.
 

brihard

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You're assuming every PPC vote is taken from CPC, where some of those folks are Libertarians seeing a more viable Federal Party. I use viable in the loosest possible context, considering their candidates are photoshopping themselves into photos to use as their official election photo:

PPC Candidate, Vahid Seyfaie, Photoshopped His Head On To Prince William's Body For His Official Election Photos And I Can't Stop Laughing — Dean Blundell's Sports, News, Podcast Network
No I’m not. I already said “most”. And I didn’t keep the spreadsheet, but I recall there being a couple seats where it was very close and it only took a fraction of PPC’s vote count to deny the CPC a seat.

Yeah, checking it again:

LPC won Miramichi by under 400 votes. PPC took over 1100.
LPC won Richmond Hill by 212 votes. PPC got 507
LPC won Kitchener-Conestoga by 365. PPC got 790
NDP won South Okanagan by 796, PPC got 1838.
LPC won Coquitlam by 390, PPC got 703
LPC took Yukon by 153, PPC got 284.

I think it’s fair to guess that PPC gained few votes from the LPC or NDP. CPC lost up to six seats, and I think in all six cases it’s reasonable to think enough of the PPC votes would probably have gone CPC to make the difference.

As I said, it made no difference in the parliamentary balance of power… Last time. The election resulted in a freakishly stable and easily maintained minority. This time around they could potentially be a major spoiler, or at least fundamentally alter the math on which party is the kingmaker for a LPC minority.
 

YZT580

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Ponzi social programs are best fixed by applying the third choice: reform (remove) the underlying ponzi structure.

More people means more accommodation needed. More energy needed. More natural resources. More pressure on the species inhabiting popular recreational lands and waters. More pressure on species in our food chain. More new kinds of jobs (not just new jobs) needed, because the resource / finishing / service economy period inverted over the past century and only a few of those "more people" will be needed in the bottom two tiers, leaving the rest to have to figure out what else people want in addition to a gourmet coffee bar on every corner. (They'll be fighting the eco-conscious crowd every step of the way, because consumption habits are at the root of most problems greens want to fix.)

Provinces must have the power to gut local zoning restrictions that block increased housing density; the feds I doubt have any. The feds do have the power to relocate facilities into the fringes of suburbia, and see whether they have to do it again in another 50 years. Maybe not if
Well that depends on who you consider to be a person. At this time in history unborn babies are not legally considered to be a person/people. However, a doctor will often take the well-being of an unborn child into consideration regardless of the fact that it isn't legally considered to be a person. And frankly the method of conception would have no legal merit if unborn children are ever recognized as persons.
 

YZT580

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There are people who believe that an unborn child is a person regardless of what the law may say. For those abortion is tantamount to murder. Likewise with regards to euthanasia. Personally, I would far rather have a medical team working on this old carcass who believe that every life is of value rather than it being composed of individuals who equate old with useless and pre-born as not human. Science does not support our current assessment of when life begins, our stance is one of convenience only.
 
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Altair

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There are people who believe that an unborn child is a person regardless of what the law may say. For those abortion is tantamount to murder. Likewise with regards to euthanasia. Personally, I would far rather have a medical team working on this old carcass who believe that every life is of value rather than it being composed of individuals who equate old with useless and pre-born as not human. Science does not support our current assessment of when life begins, our stance is one of convenience only.
darn liberals bringing up abortion again.
 

mariomike

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For those abortion is tantamount to murder.

For those old enough to remember the late Chief Coroner of Ontario Morton Shulman,
In the Sixties, abortion could be legally performed only to save the life of the woman, so there were practically no legal abortions. He stated that the pregnant daughters of the rich were sent to reliable physicians who did abortions for cash. He estimated that these physicians did twenty to thirty abortions per week. Women who were not rich were left to perform an abortion on themselves or go to what he called a "nurse" abortionist. Their method was commonly pumping Lysol into the woman's womb. The mortality rate was high and the infection rate over 50%. He added, "By the time I became Chief Coroner, I had had the unpleasant experience of seeing the bodies of some dozens of young women who had died as a result of these amateur abortions."
Chief Coroner Morton Shulman decided to publicize deaths from illegal abortions. He instructed his coroners to call a public inquest into each abortion death. He describes one case that he believes was the turning point, that of 34-year-old Lottie Leanne Clarke, a mother of three children, who died of a massive infection in 1964 after an illegal abortion in spite of medical treatment and antibiotics. At the inquest into her death, the jury recommended that the laws about therapeutic abortion be revised. Dr. Shulman added that a federal government committee should review the question of abortion and the law. Newspapers published editorials recommending the reform of the abortion law. In 1965, the Minister of Justice, Guy Favreau, wrote to Dr. Shulman that the recommendation would be considered in the program to amend the Criminal Code. The eventual amendment closely followed the recommendations of the coroners' juries.

Likewise with regards to euthanasia.

See also,


 

daftandbarmy

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Trudeau kicks off his campaign in a BC elder care facility. I guess this will be the last we see of him :)

Jack Knox: Political bloodlines show in Trudeau's Saanich stop

Justin Trudeau used to take his grandmother for joyrides in the halls of her Saanich care home.

“He and my other nephew pushed her in her wheelchair as fast they could, up and down the corridor,” says his Aunt Heather. “Mum was so thrilled.”

Victoria’s Heather Walker is the sister of Trudeau’s mother, Margaret. She and another sister, Betsy Dening, were on hand with a clutch of younger local relatives Thursday as the Liberal leader used the Veterans Memorial Lodge in Broadmead, where his grandmother spent the four years prior to her death in 2012, as the backdrop while launching a raft of election promises related to seniors.

After deploring the weaknesses in the long-term care system that were exposed by COVID (“We had to send the armed forces into retirement homes, in Canada”) Trudeau spoke of $9 billion in new spending. A $25-an-hour minimum wage for personal support workers. Training for up to 50,000 more of them. A doubling of the Home Accessibility Tax Credit.

Arrayed behind him were three local Liberal candidates — Nikki Macdonald of Victoria, Sherri Moore-Arbour of Saanich-Gulf Islands and Doug Kobayashi of Esquimalt-Saanich-Sooke — doing their best to pretend that they weren’t being harassed by wasps. Trudeau, in a crisp white shirt, sleeves rolled up, no jacket, narrow tie, looked remarkably similar to the way he looked when he made Victoria the first stop of his 2019 campaign (though, happily, the media bus didn’t drive into the Liberals’ plane at the Victoria airport this time).






 

YZT580

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For those old enough to remember the late Chief Coroner of Ontario Morton Shulman,




See also,


So what? The statement made referred to a doctor's belief that a) abortion was the murder of an unborn child and b) euthanasia was the pre-mature termination of a human life. Regardless of the law or in the case of abortion, the absence of one, those beliefs need to be respected and adjustments made to ensure that a doctor or any medical staff can work freely within his/her field and not fear repercussions. Referral is a strawman argument. Cellphones and internet access can quickly locate a competent medical team willing to undertake those procedures. Run a search through Google and you will locate a facility in every province and territory. It might not be in your neighbourhood but it is there. And for those who say it should be readily available in the neighbourhood, why? My heart specialist is a 2 hour drive. Want a baby delivered in Trenton, go down the highway to Belleville. If surgery is critical, try Oshawa or Kingston. Why should an abortion clinic be any more available?
 
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