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Canadian Surface Combatant RFQ

Underway

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This is good news! PDR usually takes about 2 weeks to go over all the systems. If they are at this stage that means that the design is ready for the review and will likely pass (its not like the PMO CSC will be surprised by anything they see).
 

MTShaw

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Big Spy-7 at Clear Air Force Station.



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Czech_pivo

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a decent write up on the process so far
And here looks to be the counter point. I don't have access behind the paywall so I'm aware of all that is being said. If anyone else can post the complete article that would be great.

 

Navy_Pete

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And here looks to be the counter point. I don't have access behind the paywall so I'm aware of all that is being said. If anyone else can post the complete article that would be great.

Alan Williams has a bit of a bias; I think he was part of a losing bid. His previous op-eds were full of untruths and conjecture, so don't think you are missing much.

Have a lot of time for Richard Shimooka's articles though; always well researched and he makes a really good point. Changing options at this point would effectively leave us with no functional warships in 15 years and cost billions on CSC alone, and the reputational damage (to our already poor reputation on defence procurement) would cost a lot in any other major procurement as well.

NSS only kicked off because of a number of guarantees in the framework that protected the shipyards if we canceled projects or otherwise got cold feet, but I'm sure there are all kinds of 'risk premiums' built into any large procurement bids for the GoC.
 

Good2Golf

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Alan Williams has a bit of a bias; I think he was part of a losing bid. His previous op-eds were full of untruths and conjecture, so don't think you are missing much.
He was also on record as saying, “just because we’re [Canada] joining the JSF Program doesn’t necessarily mean we’re going to buy the JSF.”
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Underway

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He was also on record as saying, “just because we’re [Canada] joining the JSF Program doesn’t necessarily mean we’re going to buy the JSF.”
That is true actually. You don't have to own the aircraft to be part of the program. They are separate things. I don't have to golf to be part of a golf club, just gotta pay the membership fee.
 

Good2Golf

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That is true actually. You don't have to own the aircraft to be part of the program. They are separate things. I don't have to golf to be part of a golf club, just gotta pay the membership fee.
True, but your membership vote is but one of many, and if the club votes overall to adjust rules of the club based on how the playing members in the majority want to operate the club and you don’t like the changes, you risk being told ‘whatever…you don’t even play’ and then you get to pound sand.
 

Navy_Pete

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True, but your membership vote is but one of many, and if the club votes overall to adjust rules of the club based on how the playing members in the majority want to operate the club and you don’t like the changes, you risk being told ‘whatever…you don’t even play’ and then you get to pound sand.
I believe being part of the development process allowed Canadian companies to provide components to the aircraft. Not sure what will happen if we don't buy any but there are some Canadian companies providing key systems as well as some sensors (metal detection in the oil?), and from the economic projections I remember seeing the economic benefits for that actually exceeded our JSF program costs by a lot.

If we don't buy any not sure if they will source another supplier out of the pool, but that would probably make sense.
 

Good2Golf

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I believe being part of the development process allowed Canadian companies to provide components to the aircraft. Not sure what will happen if we don't buy any but there are some Canadian companies providing key systems as well as some sensors (metal detection in the oil?), and from the economic projections I remember seeing the economic benefits for that actually exceeded our JSF program costs by a lot.

If we don't buy any not sure if they will source another supplier out of the pool, but that would probably make sense.
The JSF Program reserved the right to adjust industrial involvement in a number of factors; direct program funding by Level 1,2 and 3 partners being but one factor, procurement impact is another. Canada isn’t quite at Turkey buying an S-400 and getting turfed level, but without actually procuring the aircraft, there’s only so much value that the overall
program partners will allow Candian industry to benefit.
 

OceanBonfire

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This infrastructure will be critical in testing the new CSC ships’ combat systems and will ensure the new ships are sea-ready once delivered. As there are no existing facilities capable of supporting this type of testing for CSC in Canada, we are delivering this new, purpose-built testing facility to carry out this work as part of the CSC’s rigorous tests and trials program.

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MilEME09

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Hopefully once the CSC closes out it becomes a state if the art facility for testing all future naval systems and designs.
 
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