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Civilian Medical Records

PuckChaser

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Do you want to risk being kicked out for lying during enrollment? Part of being an adult is owning up to your mistakes, learning from them and then pushing forward. Being anything less than truthful in the recruiting process will show that you don't have the attributes we want in a CAF member.
 

mariomike

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Jay223 said:
I was wondering if the medical staff during recruitment can directly view my civilian medical records?

See Original Post,

chappyk said:
Hey, does anyone know if the CF has access to our civilian medical records?

And Reply #5,

ChopperGunner25 said:
Does the RC request to have access to your civilian medical file?
 

mariomike

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Jay223 said:
Thanks, I missed that section. Still trying to figure the whole site out.

You are welcome. Good luck.  :)
 

medicineman

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Jay223 said:
Hi everyone, first time posting on here and cannot find any real solid information on this topic anywhere. I was wondering if the medical staff during recruitment can directly view my civilian medical records? I am scheduled to do my CFAT at the end of this summer and am hoping to figure out if they can access my civilian medical records or not. As a teenagers I got involved with taking pills and ended up on methadone for a while to get off it, and personally, I really do not want to bring it up in the recruiting process. It’s somethint I’m still ashamed of to this day, but if they do have access to my medical records, I know I should tell them ahead of time rather than have them find it in my medical records later. It has been my dream to be army infantry for years, and I would hate for this mistake as a youth to ruin my chances. I did also get arrested at 16 for break and enter, and it is on my youth record, not an adult record. I am now 21 and haven’t been involved with any of that stuff for years and years and just want to move forward, but I’m very concerned my medical record will be viewed and my previous opioid dependence will disqualify me.

Thanks a lot

Google Section 117 of the National Defence Act - it spells out the legal ramifications of lying for purposes of enrollment...and it's also referenced at the bottom of the document you fill out/sign when you do your enrollment medical (unless the forms have changed since I got out of course). 

Be up front and good luck to you.


MM
 

wnhan

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You really should not be lying at any point of your application and hopefully in your career as well (assuming you are selected for your preferred trade). As stated above, there are repercussions if it was somehow discovered that you were untruthful. 
 

JesseWZ

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As stated above, there are consequences to lying on enrollment. There is an NDA charge (S 122 NDA):

"122 Every person who knowingly

(a) makes a false answer to any question set out in any document required to be completed, or

(b) furnishes any false information or false document,

in relation to the enrolment of that person is guilty of an offence and on conviction is liable to imprisonment for less than two years or to less punishment."

There is also a fun little release item (Release 1(d) or in less severe cases, 5(e) from the QR&O's:

TABLE TO ARTICLE 15.01
1. Misconduct:
D.Fraudulent Statement on Enrolment.
who, at time of enrolment, made a fraudulent statement which, having regard to the circumstances under which it was made and its effect, warrants release under this item; a false statement as to age made by an underage applicant, or a minor oversight or ambiguous statement made through enthusiasm to join the forces, should not result in release under this category. (See article 15.32 – Release for Fraudulent Enrolment and Item 5(e).) 

5. Service Completed
E. Applies to the release of an officer or non-commissioned member by reason of an irregular enrolment other than Item 1(d).

http://www.forces.gc.ca/en/about-policies-standards-queens-regulations-orders-vol-01/ch-15.page

Don't start your career as a liar. Be up front, accept any potential consequences to past actions and carry on. It will be what is expected of you when you join.
 

Schwartzie55

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You will be asked about drug use etc. after your CFAT and interview and you will be required to sign that document that the information you provided is correct and true. You will be asked again during your medical. You need to make the right decision, and that’s simple enough. Tell the truth, be honest.
 

Xylric

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As a result of my medical evaluation on the 24th, I've been given a few forms for my GP to fill out in relation to the treatment and diagnosis of something. The problem is, while I have been a patient at his practice my entire life (to the point that one of the founding doctors of the practice delivered my twin brother and I - on his own birthday, no less), I seldom have cause to go to see him - not because I'm stubborn, but because I've never had any legitimately serious medical concerns while in his care beyond the standard emergency care (broken bones, cuts, and the like), and even then I have fingers left over when counting up those incidents. I last saw him in 2015, as a follow up to the initial diagnosis of the above.

The sickest I've ever been would've been before my first birthday, if what my family has told me is true.

The problem is, I switched to him as my standard GP after my initial doctor (the one who delivered me) scaled back and sold this practice. While all records remain, the fact is, I'm not sure how much detail he'd be able to provide. Is it possible that my good health might hamper filling out this batch of paperwork?
 

ontheedge

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If the doctor and or his associates have access to all your information and medical history, they should be able to give the medical opinion required for the application. Good health doesn’t hamper things usually, unless there are inconsistencies or missing details. But where info is missing, it can usually be obtained with some delay and cost ....
 

Xylric

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So gaps of "I only see him once every three years or so" is fairly commonplace?
 

Blackadder1916

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Xylric said:
So gaps of "I only see him once every three years or so" is fairly commonplace?

Yes.  While GPs may not be asked everyday to fill out employment medical forms it happens often enough that they are familiar with the process.  Employment medical forms from the CF will usually be more direct and specific (or at least that's been my experience) so there shouldn't be confusion on the part of your doctor.  If he/she/they made adequate notes when you did see them and (following standard required practise) filed specialists' and diagnostic testing reports on your file, everything should be there for them to complete the forms.  Of note, since this is not a medically required service, the completion of such forms are not covered by your provincial health insurance and thus your doctor may charge you for the service,
 

Xylric

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Blackadder1916 said:
Yes.  While GPs may not be asked everyday to fill out employment medical forms it happens often enough that they are familiar with the process.  Employment medical forms from the CF will usually be more direct and specific (or at least that's been my experience) so there shouldn't be confusion on the part of your doctor.  If he/she/they made adequate notes when you did see them and (following standard required practise) filed specialists' and diagnostic testing reports on your file, everything should be there for them to complete the forms.  Of note, since this is not a medically required service, the completion of such forms are not covered by your provincial health insurance and thus your doctor may charge you for the service,

That makes perfect sense, thank you. Now I just need to confirm the e-mail address to send the forms and results, as the alternative would be for me to drop it off in person, and I'm not sure if that's appropriate for this.
 
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