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Crazy Edmonton Murder.

MPwannabe

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'I shot grandpa,' Alberta woman told grandson

http://www.cbc.ca/canada/edmonton/story/2010/11/03/edmonton-semenovich-confession.html

1. Crazy family drama in Edmonton.
2. Grandma shoots Grandpa
3. Grandma tells Grandson
4. Grandson phones Mom, tells her '"My worst fears have come true," he told his mother. "She blasted him." (lol)
5. Grandma and Mom convince Grandson to help them dispose of body. He agrees, in order to 'shut them up'.
6. Grandson phones RCMP two weeks later, tells them 'Grandpa's in the incinerator'.

Apparently Grandpa was crazy, and the family pretty much said he had it coming to him.
WTF?! That's one of the craziest things I've ever heard. You can't write that kind of stuff.
 

PuckChaser

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Grandpa Crazy.... or was the Grandma crazy?!
 

Final

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This is just brutal, First killing the grandfather and then coercing the grandson into helping sweep this under the rug..
 

Searyn

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"On Tuesday, Semenovich told the jury his grandfather threatened to kill his grandmother nearly every day. He said he saw his grandfather chase his grandmother with a large kitchen knife and swing a baseball bat at her."

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/canada/edmonton/story/2010/11/03/edmonton-semenovich-confession.html#ixzz14IHBP45v


Sounds like another case of woman finally snaps on abusive husband and deals with it herself. It's a shame it had to come to this, and that she had to resort to this kind of act.

However on the other side, it's a shame someone had to die when she could have just left. I know it's not always that simple, but at some point personal safety takes precedence over keeping someone else happy
 

readytogo

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This case is surely one of the strangest to come across the court system in Edmonton for quite some time.  Still to say she was finally striking back after years of abuse...why try and hide it, if there was documentation of abuse, or police reports, or something else to prove it had been happening all this time.  With evidence proving a lifetime of abuse she probably could of shot him and called the police herself and gotten a signifigantly less charge.  She and her family tried to cover it up and that is why we have a 73 year old woman on trial for 1st degree murder.



RTG :cdn:
 

OldSolduer

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readytogo said:
This case is surely one of the strangest to come across the court system in Edmonton for quite some time.  Still to say she was finally striking back after years of abuse...why try and hide it, if there was documentation of abuse, or police reports, or something else to prove it had been happening all this time.  With evidence proving a lifetime of abuse she probably could of shot him and called the police herself and gotten a signifigantly less charge.  She and her family tried to cover it up and that is why we have a 73 year old woman on trial for 1st degree murder.



RTG :cdn:
I'm not an expert on Domestic Violence (DV) but I did work in a jail for close to 10 years and picked up a lot of information from the DV folks. An abused is unlikely to leave, as there is no where else to go.
The abuser has isolated the victim - socially, financially etc - Abusers are control freaks.

 

simysmom99

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What I think is the kookiest part is that she called to get the incinerator fixed for the first time and when asked why she said "so I can burn my husband's body in it".  That might have been the first clue she was a bit off.
Crazy old bird makes me shake my head.
 

MPwannabe

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I'm assuming that the Grandfather was crazy from day 1, and that he had an entire marriage to manipulate and abuse not only the Grandma, but the entire family. It's no wonder the whole family ended up trying to cover up the act.
 

Final

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Jim Seggie said:
I'm not an expert on Domestic Violence (DV) but I did work in a jail for close to 10 years and picked up a lot of information from the DV folks. An abused is unlikely to leave, as there is no where else to go.
The abuser has isolated the victim - socially, financially etc - Abusers are control freaks.
This isnt always true though.  Some people will just stay because it's all they have and they have a fear of losing what they have gotten for themselves.  Or perhaps it could just be simply, they think it shows love, when in fact its just power.  But nonetheless, A lot of people can and do have the power to just up and leave.
 

Container

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Final said:
This isnt always true though.  Some people will just stay because it's all they have and they have a fear of losing what they have gotten for themselves.  Or perhaps it could just be simply, they think it shows love, when in fact its just power.  But nonetheless, A lot of people can and do have the power to just up and leave.

Where do you get your information? Its well established that what Jim Seggie alluded to is fact. They try and leave unsuccessfully multiple times before getting it right if they try at all. Generally they are older women because they have endured it for years and finally decide. Younger ladies in "love" try and stick it out.

The abuser generally controls the finances. They do not just have the power to leave.
 

PMedMoe

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Not to mention, they've been threatened with violence (or death) if they leave.
 

stukirkpatrick

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Well, it's over now.  She made a sudden plead guilty to manslaughter w/ firearm and interfering with human remains, and is set to serve 4 years.  I wonder about how merciful the court will be toward her daughter and grandson as accessories.

I'm not an expert on Domestic Violence (DV) but I did work in a jail for close to 10 years and picked up a lot of information from the DV folks. An abused is unlikely to leave, as there is no where else to go.
The abuser has isolated the victim - socially, financially etc - Abusers are control freaks.

That, as part of battered women syndrome would be her best defence to killing him, if she was arguing self-defence since the moment she fired the shot - but the fact that she covered it up after, and coerced her family to do the same certainly hurt her case (talk about dark family secret!).  Maybe there was no reported history and she didn`t think she would be believed?  Sometimes there is no evidence that abuse has ever happened, and it`s hidden from everyone outside the home.
 

Final

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Container said:
Where do you get your information? Its well established that what Jim Seggie alluded to is fact. They try and leave unsuccessfully multiple times before getting it right if they try at all. Generally they are older women because they have endured it for years and finally decide. Younger ladies in "love" try and stick it out.

The abuser generally controls the finances. They do not just have the power to leave.
My information is from personal experiences experienced by myself and my family. 

What I said was a suggested possibility, I'm not saying it happens often or anything.
 

OldSolduer

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Final said:
My information is from personal experiences experienced by myself and my family. 

What I said was a suggested possibility, I'm not saying it happens often or anything.

Like I said, I'm not an expert. Everyone's experience will differ. The majority of men in the DV areas of the jails have issues with women, issues with authority and are control freaks.
 

Container

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Its your personal experience that people stay with abusers because they are scared to lose their stuff?

The overwhelming majority of women in these types of situations cannot leave. Perpetuating the myth of how easy it is doesn't help them out.
 

Final

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Jim Seggie said:
Like I said, I'm not an expert. Everyone's experience will differ. The majority of men in the DV areas of the jails have issues with women, issues with authority and are control freaks.
In my experiences, What you say here is unbelievably true.  Ive seen one man abuse his wife while under the influence, and then go right on to steal from his mother and abuse her vocally and physically.  Horrible stuff.

@Container:  While the majority are as you say, There are different cases each time.  Some have built a life with this abuser, matched finances to buy/rent houses and so on.  Think of how you would feel if after 5 years with someone, how you now have a house with them and what it would feel like to lose it all.  I know that everyone's not like that, but its possible.
 
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