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General Surgeon in CF

steep

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Hey all,

It's been a long time since I've been on these forums. I will be starting my residency in general surgery this summer and I've been considering getting back into the CF. However I have no idea what surgeons do day to day in the CF. I am aware that there are only OR's in Edmonton and Pet, so I would guess these are the only places surgeons would be posted. As a surgeon in the CF are doctors operating throughout the week? I can't imagine there would be a large enough volume to run OR's everyday. If not, then are surgeons working in civilian hospitals as well?

If there is anyone who has any insight it would be very much appreciated!

Thanks!
 

DAA

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PteFabulous said:
Hey all,

It's been a long time since I've been on these forums. I will be starting my residency in general surgery this summer and I've been considering getting back into the CF. However I have no idea what surgeons do day to day in the CF. I am aware that there are only OR's in Edmonton and Pet, so I would guess these are the only places surgeons would be posted. As a surgeon in the CF are doctors operating throughout the week? I can't imagine there would be a large enough volume to run OR's everyday. If not, then are surgeons working in civilian hospitals as well?

If there is anyone who has any insight it would be very much appreciated!

Thanks!

Why have you not applied for MOTP?  Unless you were already an MO but now expanding your horizons.
 

CombatDoc

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All of our General Surgeons are embedded in civilian hospitals and research institutions, Toronto and Vancouver being two examples. For example, the head of Trauma at Sunnybrook Hospital in Toronto is a CF surgeon. There are no CF operating rooms in Pet or Edmonton.  Day to day life of a CF surgeon is similar to that of civilian surgeon.  Surgeons everywhere have some limitations on OR time availability. 

We have had some qualified surgeons join the CF as Direct Entry MOs - this occurred after they completed all residency/licensure requirements. You would not qualify for the MOTP entry program since the purpose of MOTP is to generate General Duty Medical Officers, not specialists.  The MMTP program is used to provide specialty residency training to CF GDMOs ie already serving.

Where are you doing your Gen Surg residency?
 

steep

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I did not apply for MOTP because at that point was not ready to commit to the return of service, and also wasn't sure what specialty I wanted at that time. Now that I matched I am just trying to get more information about future career options. During my previous time as a reserve med tech, I only worked with a few GDMO's so I have no idea where/what specialists do in the reg force.

That's interesting to know that surgeons mostly work out of civilian institutions. How does it work for hiring? Does there need to be a civilian position open to place a military surgeon, or is a position created since their salary is paid by the military?

I will be training in Saskatchewan.
 

Armymedic

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I don't know enough to answer all your questions. But I do know specialist surgeons are, for the most part, members of 1 Canadian Field Hospital. They work as staff at various civilian hospitals. I know of surgeons who work at Vancouver, Winnipeg, London, Toronto, Ottawa, Montreal, and Halifax.

Inquire at your local Saskatoon recruiting office, and the staff should be able answer your questions.
 

Nudibranch

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Recruiting center is actually not the best in your situation, which is somewhat unique. While still in med school you wouldn't qualify for MOTP, but since you've matched, and depending on its needs, CF might (*might*) fund you from this point on. GenSx was pretty high on the "things we need" list last I checked, which was a couple of years ago.
You need to reach out to whoever is currently the CF's physician recruiter. I don't know the official person, but LCol Annette Snow (ret), who is on Facebook, functions as a good point of contact.

And yeah, unless you deploy, it'll pretty much be civi like career where the CF pays you Mon-Fri for an 8 or whatever hour day, and any work above you bill. Often you'd do an outpatient clinic at your nearest base clinic, once a week or every 2 weeks. Maybe participate in a larger Ex with Pet's field hospital.
 

BurnDoctor

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PteFabulous, a good option to explore might be what was previously called the Health Services Primary Reserve List, now known as 1 Cdn Hosp, Det Ottawa - basically the 'home' unit for all of us Specialist Medical Officers from coast-to-coast.  Being a Specialist MO in the Reserves offers the latitude to have the type (within reason) and location of civilian practice that suits you, while still being able to participate in training and operations with the Fd Hosp when need arises, and without the return of service commitment. Timing-wise, I suspect that a Reserve application would make most sense to pursue once you are close to completing residency, as the CF would have little use for you in your current un-trained (vis a vis surgery, anyway) state - no offence.

I personally enrolled (long) after my surgical residency ended, and my BOTC included another (at that time soon-to-be) surgeon who was in his fifth and final year of residency, so that type of situation is not without precedent.  Enrolling Reg Force after residency is an option that has recent precedent also, and of course carries no return of service commitment, and practice-wise would be basically as Nudibranch and Rider Pride have described.

Feel free to PM me if you'd like to continue the conversation off-line. I can certainly provide some points of contact if either the Reg or Reserve options have appeal for you.
 
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