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Global Warming/Climate Change Super Thread

kev994

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It's irrelevant. I prefer older vehicles on which I can save money by doing work myself.
I see. Well maybe I can interest you in one of these EVs.
 

TacticalTea

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Costs are generally passed along to customers. The push to change depends on whether the companies think they can do something that will give them a competitive advantage. But that's offset by the need not to do anything if the commodity is in high demand. Policies that result in high oil prices are in a tug-of-war with policies intended to promote innovation.
A tug of war is a good way to describe just about any healthy (viable) act or policy, even on a personal level. Checks and balances, diminishing returns, complementarity. All concepts that help define a proper framework of action.

I've already outlined the importance of facilitating the production of energy and counter-balancing the carbon tax with incentivizing innovation. The best economic policies have always been the ones that consist in ''two-pronged attacks'', providing both a carrot and a stick to carry forward positive change.
 

Quirky

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Personally, I would rather see an expansion of mass transit initiatives to replace our bigger polluters (jet aircraft)

Baby steps, but in the right direction.


Maybe taxing airlines their fair share will help them move things along faster? They won’t pass on the tax to ticket sales..
 

Halifax Tar

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I think the idea is to gradually increase the cost so that people can make decisions on whether to buy a more efficient vehicle as it’s due for normal replacement. The amount of people in this country who drive a giant pickup to their jobs downtown and never take them off the pavement is mind boggling.

So you don't want to take freedom of choice away, you just want to financially punish those who want to choose another type of vehicle because it goes against your beliefs ?

Trucks aren't a human right. People do just fine in Europe and Japan with public transportation.

Its not about trucks. Its about the freedom of choice. And financially penalizing people because the choose vehicle A over vehicle B is not going to work.

Also WRT trucks. They have all but supplanted the mini van as the family vehicle now. They are the most practical, safe and utilitarian vehicles on the road. They are also wildly more efficient than ever and are measurable better than some cars and SUVs and just about every minivan. I drive an F150 with a 3L Diesel. I get 7-8L/100Km on the highway and around 9-10 in the city. And I have a massive tank that ranges over 1000km on the hwy and around 850 +/- in the city.

As far as I am concerned if you don't own a modern pick up, I think you should. They are so very capable and efficient now. And the idea that a person who owns a truck should be traveling goat paths is stupid. Most trucks haul campers, hockey bags, ATVs and loads of material from Home Depot.

You don't win people over to the climate change movement by financially attacking them. But then again I don't think this is actually about climate change. I think its an aimed attack on people and their choices that others don't agree with. Just like the current firearms legislation. It has nothing to with public safety and everything to do with punishing "the others".
 

Dana381

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Again, lithium comes from salt brine, the open pit mine popular on social media that purports to be an “open pit lithium mine” is actually a copper mine. I don’t know what you’re smoking but nobody is trying to get rid of internal combustion engines just to ‘stick it to the little guy’.

Edit: here’s what “strip mining” looks like

How about the cobalt, it's mined by child slaves in the congo. EV proponents typically push it to virtue signal that they are better than us because they care more about the environment. Many have the same woke mentality that push CRT down our throats but don't seem to care about how those EVs get built.
just a slight diversion. Are Peterbuilts and Kenworths considered good trucks now. Like 10 yrs ago I wouldnt touch them with a 10 foot pole.

Peterbilt and Kenworth trucks are nearly identical the way a Chev and GMC pickup are. They are both owned by Paccar. 10 years age they were probably the best built trucks on the road but parts are very expensive. The new wide cab models aren't as well built as legacy ones.

25 years ago almost all trucks used either a Cat Cummins or Detroit engine Mack being the exception. They all used Eaton transmissions. Mack being the only one to build their own but not many buyers ordered it, maybe 10%. Eaton and Meritor (formerly Rockwell) and Mack were the axle manufacturers. So most trucks on the road then the cab is the only real difference. Interesting fact in order to get a gold bulldog on a Mack it has to be 'all Mack' engine, trans and axles.

2002/3 Freightliner bought out detroit diesel and since then have developed transmissions and axles. International licensed the Cat C15 block and bolted shitty parts to it and called it Maxxforce, terrible engine. Paccar brought their European engine over from their Daf trucks and I think they have a transmission now also and Volvo/Mack dropped all third party engines until the new MD Mack with the ISB Cummins. Trucks are gradually becoming more like cars in that each brand is completely different from each other. With the one exception they all use Cummins emissions systems.
 

Good2Golf

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Also WRT trucks. They have all but supplanted the mini van as the family vehicle now. They are the most practical, safe and utilitarian vehicles on the road. They are also wildly more efficient than ever and are measurable better than some cars and SUVs and just about every minivan. I drive an F150 with a 3L Diesel. I get 7-8L/100Km on the highway and around 9-10 in the city. And I have a massive tank that ranges over 1000km on the hwy and around 850 +/- in the city.
Diesel for the win!
BF247582-D13D-4047-87F9-FE2DB177EE07.jpeg
 

QV

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So you don't want to take freedom of choice away, you just want to financially punish those who want to choose another type of vehicle because it goes against your beliefs ? Its not about trucks. Its about the freedom of choice. And financially penalizing people because the choose vehicle A over vehicle B is not going to work. Also WRT trucks. They have all but supplanted the mini van as the family vehicle now. They are the most practical, safe and utilitarian vehicles on the road. They are also wildly more efficient than ever and are measurable better than some cars and SUVs and just about every minivan. I drive an F150 with a 3L Diesel. I get 7-8L/100Km on the highway and around 9-10 in the city. And I have a massive tank that ranges over 1000km on the hwy and around 850 +/- in the city. As far as I am concerned if you don't own a modern pick up, I think you should. They are so very capable and efficient now. And the idea that a person who owns a truck should be traveling goat paths is stupid. Most trucks haul campers, hockey bags, ATVs and loads of material from Home Depot. You don't win people over to the climate change movement by financially attacking them. But then again I don't think this is actually about climate change. I think its an aimed attack on people and their choices that others don't agree with. Just like the current firearms legislation. It has nothing to with public safety and everything to do with punishing "the others".

This is exactly right.
 

kev994

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How about the cobalt, it's mined by child slaves in the congo. EV proponents typically push it to virtue signal that they are better than us because they care more about the environment. Many have the same woke mentality that push CRT down our throats but don't seem to care about how those EVs get built.
I still don’t see why you’re OK with strip-mining in Alberta but not some other place that you’ve never heard of.
 

lenaitch

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So you don't want to take freedom of choice away, you just want to financially punish those who want to choose another type of vehicle because it goes against your beliefs ?



Its not about trucks. Its about the freedom of choice. And financially penalizing people because the choose vehicle A over vehicle B is not going to work.

Also WRT trucks. They have all but supplanted the mini van as the family vehicle now. They are the most practical, safe and utilitarian vehicles on the road. They are also wildly more efficient than ever and are measurable better than some cars and SUVs and just about every minivan. I drive an F150 with a 3L Diesel. I get 7-8L/100Km on the highway and around 9-10 in the city. And I have a massive tank that ranges over 1000km on the hwy and around 850 +/- in the city.

As far as I am concerned if you don't own a modern pick up, I think you should. They are so very capable and efficient now. And the idea that a person who owns a truck should be traveling goat paths is stupid. Most trucks haul campers, hockey bags, ATVs and loads of material from Home Depot.

You don't win people over to the climate change movement by financially attacking them. But then again I don't think this is actually about climate change. I think its an aimed attack on people and their choices that others don't agree with. Just like the current firearms legislation. It has nothing to with public safety and everything to do with punishing "the others".
I'm a truck fan myself, but if you're an urban dweller who's only need is to drive to work and pick-up groceries, they are wildly impractical. You woulld struggle to get them into a condo parking spot, townhouse garage or even a lot of retail parking spots the way they are painting them now. Unless you go AWD, an empty truck has fairly usless winter traction. Manufacturers love them - their profit margin is about 4x that of a passenger car.
How about the cobalt, it's mined by child slaves in the congo. EV proponents typically push it to virtue signal that they are better than us because they care more about the environment. Many have the same woke mentality that push CRT down our throats but don't seem to care about how those EVs get built.


Peterbilt and Kenworth trucks are nearly identical the way a Chev and GMC pickup are. They are both owned by Paccar. 10 years age they were probably the best built trucks on the road but parts are very expensive. The new wide cab models aren't as well built as legacy ones.

25 years ago almost all trucks used either a Cat Cummins or Detroit engine Mack being the exception. They all used Eaton transmissions. Mack being the only one to build their own but not many buyers ordered it, maybe 10%. Eaton and Meritor (formerly Rockwell) and Mack were the axle manufacturers. So most trucks on the road then the cab is the only real difference. Interesting fact in order to get a gold bulldog on a Mack it has to be 'all Mack' engine, trans and axles.

2002/3 Freightliner bought out detroit diesel and since then have developed transmissions and axles. International licensed the Cat C15 block and bolted shitty parts to it and called it Maxxforce, terrible engine. Paccar brought their European engine over from their Daf trucks and I think they have a transmission now also and Volvo/Mack dropped all third party engines until the new MD Mack with the ISB Cummins. Trucks are gradually becoming more like cars in that each brand is completely different from each other. With the one exception they all use Cummins emissions systems.
Lithium is also found in 'hardrock' formations and there are a number of sites at the exploratory stage in northern Ontario. an added bonus is it is often found with some other rar earth minerals.

Cobalt has been known in Ontario for over a hundred years but until recently it was considered waste as there was little to no market for it. There are mountains of it in tailing piles all around, you guessed it - Cobalt Ontario when it was mined as a major silver camp. Companies are setting up to both process the tailings and explore old silver mines for their cobalt potential.
 

Fishbone Jones

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To no one in particular. I have a pickup. Always have, always will. I'm not buying into the EV stuff. I'm not stopping to recharge every 150Km, when pulling my trailer. I burn gas. I might look at diesel next time.
Either way, what I drive is my business. Not the governments and not some tree hugging climate disciples. Don't try inconvenience or restrict me because you worship at the altar of Al Gore. That's just the plain and simple of it. Quit trying to bend other people to accept your restrictions, in your response, to the biggest ponzi scheme in the history of the world. They just don't believe you.
 

Brad Sallows

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A tug of war is a good way to describe just about any healthy (viable) act or policy, even on a personal level. Checks and balances, diminishing returns, complementarity. All concepts that help define a proper framework of action.

I've already outlined the importance of facilitating the production of energy and counter-balancing the carbon tax with incentivizing innovation. The best economic policies have always been the ones that consist in ''two-pronged attacks'', providing both a carrot and a stick to carry forward positive change.
"Carrot-and-stick" means positive and negative incentives to move in the same direction. I'm writing about policies that tend to cancel each other out, but in addition create market distortions. Better to leave energy companies and their "windfall" profits alone, and stop threatening to make their investments unprofitable, and let them decide how to invest.
 

Quirky

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Diesel for the win!

I'm glad you are there to offset my 17L/100km 3-row V8 full sized SUV that's only used to drive to work and pick-up groceries for my wife and I.

EVs are great and all, but at least we don't have to plan our long-distance driving around EV charging stations, never mind the extra time you waste sitting at a supercharger station in -20c where battery range and performance is already reduced.
 

Fishbone Jones

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I still don’t see why you’re OK with strip-mining in Alberta but not some other place that you’ve never heard of.
Maybe because Alberta uses machinery to dig and transport. Maybe because Alberta has a reclamation and rejuvenation plan for old sites. Maybe because Alberta follows Health and Safety legislation for workers that doesn't allow for 10 year old children to dig with their hands, so Red China can take advantage of them.
 

Brad Sallows

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One reason people commute in pickups is because they own only two vehicles and they live in areas where you can own and store a lot of stuff. Typically the wife prefers something other than a pickup, which leaves the husband driving the pickup. Why is one a pickup? Where I live: because a pickup is the most convenient vehicle for transporting recreational gear (motorcycles, snowmobiles, ATVs), bulky/hefty home and yard improvement materials, and towing trailers - and all those things are reasons to live in areas where you can own and store a lot of stuff.
 

Halifax Tar

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I'm a truck fan myself, but if you're an urban dweller who's only need is to drive to work and pick-up groceries, they are wildly impractical. You woulld struggle to get them into a condo parking spot, townhouse garage or even a lot of retail parking spots the way they are painting them now. Unless you go AWD, an empty truck has fairly usless winter traction. Manufacturers love them - their profit margin is about 4x that of a passenger car.

Yup, so that's an opinion. Who are you to decide what's practical or impractical for another individual ?

If a condo owner wants a jacked 2500 coal roller that's their business and they have to deal with it, good or bad. But you don't get a say.

As for usefulness in the winter. I don't know why anyone would by a 2 wheel drive truck, but again that's a choice for them not me. I know I love watching cars struggle through weather while I plow on in 4H. 4x4 and aggressive tires and Ive never been stopped.
 

Good2Golf

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I'm glad you are there to offset my 17L/100km 3-row V8 full sized SUV that's only used to drive to work and pick-up groceries for my wife and I.
I’m only a 2-row SUV, but the 3.0 V6 still has 460 ft-lbs of torque and can pull 7,300 lbs, so can easily pull a 2-axle hyd lift utility trailer…I just don’t get 6.5L/100 when I do that. 😉

If I ever do an EV for zipping around semi-urban /urban mode, I still won’t be giving up my great great grandson of Rudolph Diesel! 😆
 

Halifax Tar

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I’m only a 2-row SUV, but the 3.0 V6 still has 460 ft-lbs of torque and can pull 7,300 lbs, so can easily pull a 2-axle hyd lift utility trailer…I just don’t get 6.5L/100 when I do that. 😉

If I ever do an EV for zipping around semi-urban /urban mode, I still won’t be giving up my great great grandson of Rudolph Diesel! 😆

Me either. I'm keeping my oil burner.

I just wish I could legally do an EGR/Def Sys delete.
 

Quirky

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I’m only a 2-row SUV, but the 3.0 V6 still has 460 ft-lbs of torque and can pull 7,300 lbs, so can easily pull a 2-axle hyd lift utility trailer…I just don’t get 6.5L/100 when I do that. 😉

If I ever do an EV for zipping around semi-urban /urban mode, I still won’t be giving up my great great grandson of Rudolph Diesel! 😆
See if you weren't so environmentally conscious, you'd be driving an AMG. A real one, not the ones with the AMG trim level. ;)
 
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