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Injured on duty

Roy Harding

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Kirsten Luomala said:
I've read this thread and totally understand that most people are frustrated with the medical system.  Try to understand that the system is under some big changes these past few years and the bugs are still trying to be worked out.  On of my major complaints is that most Military medical clinics have surveys that we would like to have filled out.  Most patients refuse.  You can also complain through your chain of command if you truly feel that you are hard done by.  The system will never get better if those who claim they are hard done by or are not treated professionally by the system and its staff, don't come forward.  I have been the 2 ic of treatment room in Gagetown for the past 2 years and have not had a single complaint forward to me about my staff not being professional.    My other suggestion is find out how you would be dealt with on civi street.  We have it really good in comparison.  My young daughter is awaiting testing after a massive brain injury.  the testing is a 18 month to 2 year wait for Neurophysic testing.  A military person would wait about 6 months.  WE HAVE IT MUCH BETTER THAN THE CIVI's

Listen to her, folks - she knows what of she speaks. 

In my experience with injured soldiers over the years, it was not so much the MEDICAL system that was frustrating them, as the PERSONNEL/ADMINISTRATIVE system.  A good medic (and I include Kirsten in that group) will direct you to the administrative staff and/or your chain of command regarding any administrative problems you may have.

Having only been out for slightly over a year, I cannot accurately compare the civilian system to the military - I've been more or less happy with my interactions with both.
 

the 48th regulator

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Listen to her, folks - she knows what of she speaks. 

In my experience with injured soldiers over the years, it was not so much the MEDICAL system that was frustrating them, as the PERSONNEL/ADMINISTRATIVE system.  A good medic (and I include Kirsten in that group) will direct you to the administrative staff and/or your chain of command regarding any administrative problems you may have.

Having only been out for slightly over a year, I cannot accurately compare the civilian system to the military - I've been more or less happy with my interactions with both.

Humbug!

That is all I will say.

30 Serbs couldn't kill me, but the Canadian medical community has done their best to destroy my spirit.  I have found only a few good apples in a barrel of rotten ones.

Ten years, and I still hit many a road block...but I will keep plugging away..

tess



 

Roy Harding

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the 48th regulator said:
Humbug!

That is all I will say.

30 Serbs couldn't kill me, but the Canadian medical community has done their best to destroy my spirit. I have found only a few good apples in a barrel of rotten ones.

Ten years, and I still hit many a road block...but I will keep plugging away..

tess

It would seem that the Canadian medical community has been as successful as your 30 Serbs.

I see by your profile that you are now 48th Highlanders.  Were you Reg or Res at the time of the injury?  (Not that it SHOULD matter, but most experiences in UNPROFOR with Reserve soldiers were definitely less than text book examples of how the system should work.)

I would submit, however, that if your experience is similar to most others that I am aware of, your beef is NOT with the Medical community, but with the administrative system.  If you were with 2 VP at the time of the incident, I am well aware of the action to which you refer - much has been done since that time to correct the systemic shortcomings.  If you want to email me direct, I may be able to suggest some points of contact for you that you haven't considered yet.
 

the 48th regulator

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My beef is completely with the medical community.

I will take you up on your offer, maybe you have the right information I have been seeking the last ten years.  I can then pass this on to the Powers that be, and ask why it has taken so long to resolve my issue, when the answers were readily available.

And yes I was reservist when I was injured, the Driver Regular force.  And we have received the exact same type of run around from our system, including and especially the medical portion.

As I said I will not cast down the whole group, as there are some stellar members who do seek out to assist.  But they are bogged down by a slow moving, antiquated, arrogant system that hinders them doing what should be done.

My medical treatment with "UNPROFOR" was excellent and very professional. The Canadian medical members, The 6th American Naval fleet , and even NDMC should be commended.

The follow up has been horrendous.  Lost files. wrong paperwork, wrong diagnosis, treatment etc etc.  I have seen it all and I f I were to publish my diary about it, it would be a considered a comedy of errors.

So, I do not feel we should kid ourselves or try to convince those that have not had the pleasure to experience it, that every think is OK and getting better...It's not.

Dileas

tess

 

Cansky

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48th I'm not surprised to hear you have problems with our system.  One of the areas lacking the most is in regards to the reserves.  I have been with the medical system for 17 years and although great strides have been made to improve the system the reserves still seem to be a lacking area.  Mostly this is because when they are finished their deployments or taskings, the question becomes who does their follow up and usually they get left behind.  If you don't mind, you can PM me your concerns and I will do all I can to find you any answers you need (or you can post here, what ever you preference is)  In the mean time I will talk with case managers to find out what our role is in looking after reserves.  My understanding is if you were injured while working on contract (regardless of where, regardless of location) the military must look after that injury or concern.  I will confirm all this.  But please feel free to ask any questions.  I look at my job as we are to serve the troops and get them the help they. 
 

Gunner98

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Despite one definition given earlier in this thread.  Her is more iinfo:

Physiatrists treat acute and chronic pain and musculoskeletal disorders. They may see a person who lifts a heavy object at work and experiences back pain, a basketball player who sprains an ankle and needs rehabilitation to play again, or a knitter who has carpal tunnel syndrome. Physiatrists' patients include people with arthritis, tendonitis, any kind of back pain, and work- or sports-related injuries.

Physiatrists also treat serious disorders of the musculoskeletal system that result in severe functional limitations. They would treat a baby with a birth defect, someone in a bad car accident, or an elderly person with a broken hip. Physiatrists coordinate the long-term rehabilitation process for patients with spinal cord injuries, cancer, stroke or other neurological disorders, brain injuries, amputations, and multiple sclerosis.

Physiatrists practice in rehabilitation centers, hospitals, and in private offices. They often have broad practices, but some concentrate on one area such as pediatrics, sports medicine, geriatric medicine, brain injury, or many other special interests.
 

Enzo

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Gunner, by that definition, it raises an interesting observation. CFRC instructed that I be examined by a physiatrist which I did and who passed me with no limitations. With that, they then again insisted that I see a physiatrist, insisting that I be evaluated by an Orthopaedic Surgeon (who are not in the habit of such evaluations, they always referred to the same physiatrist who cleared me the first time).

In the end, they wanted an Ortho, so why not simply say that in the beginning? And even the ortho who finally did see me, did so as a favour to a family friend (and at the cost of a bottle of 12yr old single malt) and was quite unimpressed with the military instructions that accompanied the forms. He also felt that the physiatrist who examined me (a couple of years had passed by this point) was the qualified person for the job according to the inadequate criteria outlined on the form. He was disgusted with the way that I've been treated (no reason not to share, besides I had to explain something since he was surprised at my excellent health and wondered why I had endurred such a runaround of bureaucratic nonsense) and was apologetic that he couldn't do anything more.

This is hardly efficiency at its finest. I don't want to blame anyone, I simply want the system to be reformed.
 
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