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Interview advice (merged)

neacha67

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Hi, I keep reading about the interview sample that people are given. I have never received this nor can I find them on the CAF website. I am a Manger in the same field I am applying for. I still want to be as prepared as possible. Thanks in advance!
 

BeyondTheNow

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bigmoodmonday said:
Hi,

is there anything I should bring to my interview? Resume, cover letter, etc?

thank you

I know things have changed somewhat since I did mine, but I treated it like a civilian job interview. Looked professional, had copies of resume, cover letter and relevant paperwork like certificates, education, references, even simple things like had my own pen, etc. Be prepared. It never hurts to present yourself well and leave a lasting impression anywhere you go. Speaking from personal experience, even if you don’t end up needing to provide any of that paperwork again, the Recruiter is still an individual who is investing their time and effort into getting you through the process (for several reasons). It’s easier for them if they see a person with potential and good attitude. There may be times you’ll have to seek their assistance with questions outside of the standard process depending on your personal circumstances. They’ll be more inclined to take a bit of extra time with an individual who shows personal pride and confidence.
 

ontheedge

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I’m not sure if it’s been said before... or asked. In civvie side it’s good practice to follow up an interview with an email thanking your interviewer. They took an hour to hear you blab about yourself when they could have been at home in an epsom salt bath so some recognition I would imagine might be appreciated.

The email of your interviewer might be found in the email you received setting up the interview.

I’ve been interviewed but not offered so take my advice with a large grain of salt.  Epsom that is.
 

JKirke

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Hi All,

I have been scheduled for my Interview\Medical on the 12th of February. Only thing that seems odd to me is I have the medical before the interview, I have searched for answers but couldn't seem to find any. I am going to have some time to clean up and change my clothes after the medical? Seems odd to have it first in my honest opinion.

Cheers
 

mariomike

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JKirke said:
I am going to have some time to clean up and change my clothes after the medical?

From what I remember, there wasn't much to "clean up" after the Medical.

From the Application Process Samples 
https://army.ca/forums/threads/13064.6475

It's not uncommon to have Medical and Interview scheduled for the same day. I haven't read on here of any problems.

See also,

Medical and Interview
https://www.google.com/search?rls=com.microsoft%3Aen-CA%3AIE-Address&rlz=1I7GGHP_en-GBCA592&ei=Hj5cXNyQC4_IsQWx9aX4BQ&q=site%3Aarmy.ca++medical+and+interview&oq=site%3Aarmy.ca++medical+and+interview&gs_l=psy-ab.3...41053.42317..44698...0.0..0.104.174.1j1......0....1..gws-wiz.......0i71.nIQ8BhNHUHw
 
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JKirke said:
Hi All,

I have been scheduled for my Interview\Medical on the 12th of February. Only thing that seems odd to me is I have the medical before the interview, I have searched for answers but couldn't seem to find any. I am going to have some time to clean up and change my clothes after the medical? Seems odd to have it first in my honest opinion.

Cheers

I had my medical and interview the same day, in my experience I was given around an hour in between the two. Plenty of time to change and prepare.
 

crlemesur

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Hey guys, I'm going in for my interview next month for NWO and was wondering what kinds of questions they might ask. I took note of what little information they give us on the Canadian Forces website, but if there's other stuff I should prepare for please let me know! Thanks.
 

Jesdeleau

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Does the "Be Honest" advice really work on interviews? I am a recent graduate and have done tons of interviews, in which I have all failed, because of being "honest". I am a naturally shy person, introvert and soft-spoken. I guess, I look weak as a person and I am also short (lol). People often think I'm not athletic but I'm pretty strong and I am good at making prompt decisions. I just don't like being rude and I believe there is always a nice way to get through stuff. Anyway, I tend to "undersell" myself during interviews because that is the kind of person I am. I hate bragging and exaggerating things. I want to be straightforward. We all need work and I will certainly do well. I went to the "best" (ranking wise) university so that's kinda a good indication of my capabilities (or maybe not).

I decided that this time, for my interview for an Engineering Officer position, I will exaggerate about my leadership skills. I have not done anything that required any military leadership, nor was I active in co-curricular activities. I am just scared that I would fail just for being completely honest. I know and I believe that I have too much potential and I just need a bit of training to be better. However, with all these competitors, I believe I should oversell myself effectively.

What do you guys think? Is it wrong? Should I be HONEST instead? Say that I'm a fast learner and I could improve my leadership skills? I badly want to be in the military.
 

mariomike

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Jesdeleau said:
Should I be HONEST instead?

They used to teach us in school that, "Honesty is the best policy."

As an officer candidate, I would think that would be especially true.

 

cld617

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Jesdeleau said:
I have not done anything that required any military leadership
Should I be HONEST instead?

Kind of assumed given that you're not a military leader yet, you shouldn't and aren't expected to have any. Yes be honest, answer their questions the best you can and keep your answers relevant to the topic. Don't try to steer the conversation towards fabrications of leadership, there's a good chance you'll do more damage than good to your potential career.
 

Jesdeleau

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mariomike said:
"Honesty is the best policy."

I used to believe in that as well but the system has scarred and failed me really bad. I know some of my former classmates who are lazy and not as competent but have easily gotten a job for simply putting up a mask. HRs (not sure if it's the same in the military) tend to want to hear the generic answers. Lies become the truth when they are said with confidence, which really disgusts me. However, that's the reality outside the forces. This is my dream job so I do not want to blow my chance. I'm very torn. I would hope recruiters in the forces don't think like the typical HRs.
 

Jesdeleau

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cld617 said:
Don't try to steer the conversation towards fabrications of leadership, there's a good chance you'll do more damage than good to your potential career.

Thanks. I'll keep that in mind.
 

mariomike

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jessi said:
I used to believe in that as well but the system has scarred and failed me really bad.

I've heard a lot of bad jokes about that saying over the years. But, they don't belong here.  :)
 

Blackadder1916

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jessi said:
. . . easily gotten a job for simply putting up a mask. . . .

Thing to remember, you're not applying for a "job".  You're applying for a career, a profession.  This isn't the typical recruitment of somebody out of school who is being considered for a specific position and is expected to be able to hit the ground running.  The recruiters don't know where you will eventually be working, though they will have a general idea about what you will be doing for the first few years of your military service and most of your first few years will be learning how to do the job.

. . . hope recruiters in the forces don't think like the typical HRs.

Recruiters aren't "HRs" as you may think of such a profession.  They are serving officers and NCOs who have been chosen to work in recruiting outside of their trades.  They could be pilots, combat arms, sailors, technicians, engineers, etc.  They have all done one of the jobs that applicants have come looking for.  By the time they are employed in recruiting they have had several years of soldiering in which to develop a good bullshit meter.  So don't bullshit, it will most likely be detected.  Though a good bullshit artist may make a good impression as to quality, honest answers have a greater chance of making a better impression.
 

Jesdeleau

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Blackadder1916 said:
Though a good bullshit artist may make a good impression as to quality, honest answers have a greater chance of making a better impression.

Woah 😲 nicely put. After days of contemplating, I’ve decided to be honest. Thanks for all the great advices 🙏🏻. Gives me the impression that the military is filled with good people. Really hope I could get in.
 

Xylric

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I've found that my major concern with interviews is being in essence too honest.

Here's the thing, though - a number of positions I've applied to, this weakness has been viewed as a significant asset - especially if it means that I am functionally incapable of taking moral or ethical shortcuts.
 

Marenzo

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All of you seem to be overthinking it. My interview for reserves was nothing like an actual job interview. Dress well, sign their papers and don't say you've joined to kill people, and boom you're enrolled.

I was wearing a black t-shirt and brown chinos at the interview because I only had 5 items in my wardrobe at that time.
 

mariomike

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Muhammad said:
My interview for reserves was nothing like an actual job interview.

Although a long time ago, neither was mine.

The PRes interview was pleasant enough. But, the "actual job interview" was toxic.

They stopped doing them years ago. But back then, it was a "stress interview".

It was a technique to test how the applicant dealt with pressure by taking them out of their comfort zone.

They still do the panel type interview, aka an oral board. But, now it's a handshake, with a pleasant send-off.





 
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