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Living with an OSI.

TN2IC

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I just had another episode today. Just woke up after taking my meds. Amazing shit.
 

Greymatters

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Wookilar said:
  I'm on my 3rd TCat, waiting for the PCat to be approved by DMedPol (been waiting 11 months now while on 3rd TCat). While release has been mentioned, it is only in passing as "it may happen" and to "prepare" me if it comes to that.  They can't even begin release proceedings without a PCat that puts you in violation of your trade specs and that is literally years away (DMedPol takes about 9-12 months to respond usually and that is after 2 TCat's).

A question for the experts: I had a physical injury where I had my first TCAT in Aug 2002, my PCAT sent in by Nov 2002, and my walking papers handed to me in Feb 2003.  Given the differences between treating a solely physical injury, where you can determine if the injury is recoverable or not, and PTSD, where longer periods of time are needed for assessment and treatment, is that still a normal time frame for assessment, classification, and notice of medical release nowadays? 

     
 

dogger1936

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Greymatters said:
A question for the experts: I had a physical injury where I had my first TCAT in Aug 2002, my PCAT sent in by Nov 2002, and my walking papers handed to me in Feb 2003.  Given the differences between treating a solely physical injury, where you can determine if the injury is recoverable or not, and PTSD, where longer periods of time are needed for assessment and treatment, is that still a normal time frame for assessment, classification, and notice of medical release nowadays? 

   

It all depends on the client. There are things such as a "complex transition" which under certain circumstances people can be retained for an extra period of time. currently I'm on my first TCAT (of my career!) 6 months from now I'll get second TCAT then onto PCAT. I'm looking at 2ish years from start to finish. I have both physical injuries and PTSD which both stop me from service independent of each other.

People have also been turned down for the complex transition and from what I understand is a case by case basis.

I'm no expert but that's what I've seen/ been told.
 

OldSolduer

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dogger1936 said:
It all depends on the client. There are things such as a "complex transition" which under certain circumstances people can be retained for an extra period of time. currently I'm on my first TCAT (of my career!) 6 months from now I'll get second PCAT then onto PCAT. I'm looking at 2ish years from start to finish. I have both physical injuries and PTSD which both stop me from service independent of each other.

People have also been turned down for the complex transition and from what I understand is a case by case basis.

I'm no expert but that's what I've seen/ been told.

That's about right, but every soldier is different.
 

the 48th regulator

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Greymatters said:
A question for the experts: I had a physical injury where I had my first TCAT in Aug 2002, my PCAT sent in by Nov 2002, and my walking papers handed to me in Feb 2003.  Given the differences between treating a solely physical injury, where you can determine if the injury is recoverable or not, and PTSD, where longer periods of time are needed for assessment and treatment, is that still a normal time frame for assessment, classification, and notice of medical release nowadays? 

   


I am not trying to be crass when I say this.  Riddle me this batman, how long is a piece of string?

 

Wookilar

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Exactly.

There are so many programs now. Accommodation is being used a fair bit, RTW is another that sometimes works (depending). The IPSC/JPSU's have helped streamline some of it, but only for those people that are posted there really. I'm still able to work in my trade, so I am one of the "lucky" ones lol.

With the length of time D Med Pol takes to process things, it is not uncommon for a case, such as mine, to be on their 3rd TCat while waiting for the PCat. Technically, my 3rd 6 month TCat was up....5 months ago or so. Still waiting for word from D Med Pol on whether I will be retained or not.

Since my trade is uber green right now, well, my CD 1 might be in jeopardy  ;D
 

TN2IC

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Hey guys. Just checking in once in awhile. How you making out dogger?

My question to the forum is, what does one CF member do after having an episode? Example of not sleeping at night. Starring at the ceiling. One can only pump so many pills into a person. And I had my sleeping pills taken away after one awful episode.

Do you report to the CDU in the next morning? Is this the norm for a lot CF members? I personally don't think my CWO really understands me. Jacks me up.Then  bumps me into another position, and I try my best there. I don't want to be a burden on the unit. But I want to re-muster to a non customer service/desk job. Since I find myself not really a "people person". I do try my best. I just think a bit that my best isn't enough. Doesn't matter what I do. I think in life I was meant to be a screw up.
 

dogger1936

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So what happened next.

5 years later and quite honestly the PTSD has gotten worse instead of better. I'm like that piece of meat that keep's on living. Suicidal daily however I could never do that to my children. This isnt thier pain to share in. That being quite frankly the only reason I am still here. Feelings of joy and happiness are feelings I can hardly remember. I now cycle between raging for weeks and near comatose for the next cycle. It's tiring, it's a living hell.

My career quickly went down the tubes since the last post here. No CoC to hide me away in  a job somewhere to look out for me I was really faced with MY limitations. It was a wake up call as to just how messed up I was. I was quickly ran through 2 tcats and onto pcat for a very short time before the paper tiger of Ottawa got started and I now have a upcoming release date.

Medication has changed over and over. Minor influxes of calm slowly whisked away back into the abyss that I endure every waking moment.

I still see my shrink 2 hours a week JPSU I see from time to time when I need to sign something etc. Frankly my options in lif are narrowing in upon me and it looks like I will be on LTD with SISIP for the next little while.

How the SISIP thing works: You fill out a "how are you feeling from 1 to 5" questionnaire and send it in. Next your Dr sit's down with what appears to be the same form and asks you where you are and makes his decision professionally where you stand. It get's sent off and within a week or two you hear from SISIP who tell's you your pay will be at the end of the month, that you will be required to do two more "how are you doing" things with your doctor to ensure you are still messed up. (IIRC it was 12 and 24 months). If your still messed up at 2 years it CAN (they stressed that part) continue on from there.

Other than that my career as a Snr NCO is over, I have no direction in life and am not well.
 

Pieman

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Sounds tough beyond words dogger.

  I now cycle between raging for weeks and near comatose for the next cycle. It's tiring, it's a living hell.
Anger -> Depression  then Depression -> Anger. Sounds familiar. It took me a while to realize they are interrelated. One feeds into the other and the cycle continues. I still can slip back into that cycle if I don't keep myself in check and ignore my needs.  Have the shrinks got you doing mindfulness or 'Combat Yoga'?  It helps me keep things from getting bad.

The suicidal thoughts are a new thing in my books, occurring years after I got out. They came after some friends I served with killed themselves, as if the idea was planted by their actions. Nothing to worry about for myself as it is a weak thought, but I don't understand why they are there now and are annoyingly persistent.

Anyway, I just wanted to write and let you know you are not alone in this one. It was a shitty day when I realized I was finally cornered by my symptoms and had to quit the CF. However, the support I got from the VA moving on was pretty awesome, and I found many new doors to open when I left. There are a lot of  amazing things to do in this world.
 
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