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Medical Release - Critical Assessment - PCAT - Complexity Assessment

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Hello,

If you are just about to get a PCAT, a 3B release may be in your future. You will be assigned a Case Manager (CM) after your PCAT is approved by D Mel Pol. There are a few IMPORTANT things you will want to know prior to meeting with a CM.

The CM will hand you a "Case Management Action Plan" (A checklist of stuff that you will have to do). They will also tell you about the services they offer. In reality, the CM's may not provide you anything more than a headache but,... its not really going to be about you.

What they really do for a living is a job they won't mention to you: They are going to fill out questionnaires called the "Critical Assessment" and the "Complexity Assessment". Now, why do I need to know about that?

Well, these "medical opinion" papers are designed to make a judgement on your condition prior to release. Being "non complex/non critical and able to transition to civilian care is the wording you will find in your disclosure package and on your release message. It's all about transition of care towards a Provincial Health Card and an easy release decision. Liabilities go away when your deemed non complex/non critical.

Okay so "they say" (BSurg's) that theses assessment should be done by the CM in a "Structured Interview". This is not true. The CM will ask you how your doing in the first/second interview (or both). He/she will casually ask you about family, how your coping with the illness/disease and if you can sleep at night. It is "very casual" and you may give them the impression that your doing pretty good. (It depends on the day)...Drugs are good, family is okay…Can't complain right?

WRONG! All that the CM will do is use your answers to fill out those forms (after you leave), deem you "non complex and not critical" then send it all to the Dr. to approve. The Canadian Forces wants to officially remove it's liability of care for you and send you out the door.

Now, your condition may really be non-complex and non critical and your really doing good. That's great! If you are not really doing good, the medication is not really working, your fighting with your spouse, your life is falling apart, finances suck, you need a new doctor who will care about you (not the one you have now)…you have addictions, need a social worker,etc…Your situation IS complex and the CF needs to first address those issues with you before any release plan is entertained. ADVOCATE FOR YOURSELF!

So, in your first interview with the Case Manager, you will not, n'or will you ever be casual about how you feel. Think about the worst days and feel like it is the worst days of your illness. Tell them about your real struggles, issues, complaints, problems at home, stresses, your real story. This is the time to forget pride and go full broke pitiful. 

A case that is deemed "complex" means that the CF has issues to deal with in order for them to send you away. It may translate to a prolonged transition period. (Release day deferred, better health care plan, a plan to begin with even at times)

Note: It will be very hard to get a copy of your assessments once they are done. Especially hard to get a CM to explain the process to you.

Another note: You may even wish to flat out tell the CM right from the first second you meet them that you wish to have the Complexity Assessment/Critical done by your medical specialist. (It will create a stir but you have a right to a legitimate medical assessment from a Dr. whom you trust) 

Let us know if you have any questions. We have real samples of the forms that you can read beforehand. (Prepare you for the interview :) Will post them soonest.


 

GreenMarine

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Wish I read this 2 years ago,  :deadhorse: I'm currently battling a Chain of Command, Base Surgeon, and all the medical minions.  :Jedi:

Locked in a who's job is to do what. For example had a PCAT amendment (Chit) to allow me to not wear the uniform, that officially lasted 5 days but took another 2 weeks before I heard about it. Tried to setup a meeting with the BSurg that cancelled the Chit, he Cancelled the meeting and requested a memo, sent in a memo, only to be told that he wanted my personal Complexity Assessment first and all other items can be dealt with via my Doctor. 

My Logic is why would the Doctor redo something that the Base Surg doesn't support and to add more fuel to my confusion is that may CoC may of played a role in the cancelling.

 

CountDC

Army.ca Veteran
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Porch-Light.org said:
Okay so "they say" (BSurg's) that theses assessment should be done by the CM in a "Structured Interview". This is not true. The CM will ask you how your doing in the first/second interview (or both). He/she will casually ask you about family, how your coping with the illness/disease and if you can sleep at night. It is "very casual" and you may give them the impression that your doing pretty good. (It depends on the day)...Drugs are good, family is okay…Can't complain right?

WRONG! All that the CM will do is use your answers to fill out those forms (after you leave), deem you "non complex and not critical" then send it all to the Dr. to approve. The Canadian Forces wants to officially remove it's liability of care for you and send you out the door.

Now, your condition may really be non-complex and non critical and your really doing good. That's great! If you are not really doing good, the medication is not really working, your fighting with your spouse, your life is falling apart, finances suck, you need a new doctor who will care about you (not the one you have now)…you have addictions, need a social worker,etc…Your situation IS complex and the CF needs to first address those issues with you before any release plan is entertained. ADVOCATE FOR YOURSELF!

So, in your first interview with the Case Manager, you will not, n'or will you ever be casual about how you feel. Think about the worst days and feel like it is the worst days of your illness. Tell them about your real struggles, issues, complaints, problems at home, stresses, your real story. This is the time to forget pride and go full broke pitiful.

So what I see here is you are saying because you didn't tell the CM the truth and he completed the paperwork per the information you provided it is his fault you didn't get the support you needed as if he did something wrong instead of you.  Have had some dealings with this in the past and rescued people from their own mistakes.  I always take the time to talk to the members I am aware of and advise them to tell the truth instead of sugar coating it. I am sure not all CMs are great but I have seen good ones that were very proactive at helping others and do not agree with the general path of your post brushing them as bad people out to get rid of you and deny you support.  They can only help if you are honest with them.  The best part of what you have said is the last one I quoted, swallow that pride, ignore the bs advise others have given and be fully honest.
 
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