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Medical Technician's and the Combat Arms.

BadgerTrapper

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Hey, Guys and Girls. My Name's Patrick, I'm 17 and I graduate this year (Will be 18 in July). I was looking into trades in the Forces similar to the USMC Corpsman or the US Army's Medic and all directions have pointed towards Medical Technicians, I'm aware that you're pretty much posted where the Forces decides to attach you to a unit, but I was wondering what the job is like, while not deployed but attached to a Combat arm, i.e. Infantry, Armored or Artillery. I did a search but didn't find anything useful, might just be bad parameters on my part. If you can link me to something, that'd be great it'd be even better if I could take a few moments of your time for you to possibly message me or post on this thread, Thanks for your time people :) -Patrick  :cdn:
 

medicineman

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BadgerTrapper said:
Hey, Guys and Girls. My Name's Patrick, I'm 17 and I graduate this year (Will be 18 in July). I was looking into trades in the Forces similar to the USMC USN Corpsman or the US Army's Medic ...

Fixed that for you - the Hospital Corpsmen with the Marines are Navy.

In response to your question, my info is a bit dated, but generally units have a Care Delivery Unit for their in garrison care, as well as some folks set aside to go on exercise with them.  I've heard that they're trying to go back to the old Unit Medical Sections to provide a bit more consistency to both care and who's going out the door with them.  The Units used to have their own integral medical support, but about 8 years ago that kind of changed.  If you were in a UMS, you worked with that unit - paraded with them, did unit PT, went on exercises - if your were a Coy/Sqn/Bty medic, you'd support your sub-unit in the field on exercise or deployments; when in garrison, helped out with routine medical treatment, administration and maintenance.

Hope that helps.

MM
 

BadgerTrapper

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Yes, it helps a lot. Thank you, MM. I'm interested in being out with the soldiers during Exercises and deployments, essentially being the role of a Medic. What are the chances that this will actually happen? -Patrick :cdn:
 

Armymedic

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To be a truly effective Med Tech with the Cbt arms, you need to be QL 5 qualified Cpl, although we do regularly send QL 3 qualified Ptes with them.

To increase your chances of working in the renewed UMTs (Unit medical teams) you need to be posted to one of the 3 Fd Ambs (Edmonton, Petawawa and Vacartier).

If you are really keen, fit and motivated, there are positions in the 3 CANSOFCOM units where their medics work very close to the operators of those units. But that is something to look at after you are in the CF and completed your QL 3 course.
 

BadgerTrapper

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Essentially, I want to help people. This is my main concern, as long as I'm able to do this. I'm okay with my posting, my Father's a Paramedic, I'm a Junior Volunteer Firefighter. Helping people kinda runs in the family, I've one main problem though. I do not possess a Chemistry or Physics Credit. I have my Biology, but not a Chemistry or Physics. Will this cause me grief? Or will the Volunteer Firefighting, First Aid + CPR and AED etc. More or less account for that?

EDIT: CANSOFCOM was something that I was looking at, however I wish to do my time as a lower level?( I'm not sure if that's the best choice of words, so feel free to remedy me if this is the case.) soldier first. I was very interested in CSOR and still look into it regularly.
 

medicineman

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If you really want it, get the Chem or Physics credits...IIRC, it is the requirement for admission to the Paramedic Academy at JIBC and most other colleges that run paramedic programs.

MM
 

MedCorps

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BadgerTrapper said:
I've one main problem though. I do not possess a Chemistry or Physics Credit. I have my Biology, but not a Chemistry or Physics. Will this cause me grief? Or will the Volunteer Firefighting, First Aid + CPR and AED etc. More or less account for that?

You NEED a grade 12 chemistry or physics credit AND a grade 11 math credit.  Any thing else (including what you listed) will not over ride this academic requirement.  If you want to be a Med Tech, go get the credits.  The application process is highly competitive right now (which is good for us as a CF) and the other thing you do / have (FA / AED / firefighting) will be helpful, but also there are those pesky academic pre-requisites.

Good luck.

MC
 

resolute

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I'm not a medic, but as an MO, I frequently work with them.  I am constantly surprised by how infrequently the medics seem to do medically-related tasks.  They seem to spend a lot of time stagnating "in the cages," stocking shelves / accounting for inventory, vehicle maintenance, etc.  In Edmonton, it looks like they can be posted into:  clinic, pharmacy, training, or "the field amb" - which comprises many of the above tasks that some troops refer to (disparaginly, at times) as "GD" (general duty).

In truth, MOST trades that I have witnessed in the CF have a variable amount of time spent doing "non-core" activities.  As a physician, I'm lucky that most of my time is spent practicing medicine (at least, at the Captain level).  But other trades, for example, the GDNO's (General Duty Nursing Officer's) sometimes spent months at a time posted to administrative positions, where they function almost interchangeably like HCA's (Health Care Administrators) doing coordinating tasks, answering e-mails, filling out performance evaluations on subordinates, etc.  Just the thought of all that admin is nauseating to me (of course, some people amazingly actually LIKE it, which is good for them I guess).  Now that I think of it, the above admin positions also exist for medics, although they might still get out to the field for a month or so every so often.

 

xo31@711ret

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Dating myself here Doc - your statement above is why I liked the old UMS system; sure we did a bit of med adm, but we spent most of the time with the companies, troops, etc - they knew their company medic & BTN med staff, & we knew our company troops. When in garrison we did med training with our unit MO & snr med A's. I don't know what its like today, but I remember as cpl's with a UMS, (after being observed by our MO), in the field we could prescribe basic meds (antibiotics, T-1's, etc); suture basic injuries, IV's, immunizations, blood draws etc...I'm sure our med tech's are highly professional, but speaking  for myself at least I enjoyed the old unit medical station - the only problem was, back then, as med A's with all these skills we had very little to no qualifications on civvie street....
 

KeoughJ

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This was actually a question I had aswell. I'm fighting between what I want more, Infantry or Medical Tech. But if its possible to be out with the infantry while still getting an education within the military, than that just make everything all the easier.

Now, initially I went to school for Practical Nursing, and completed 1 semester with good marks until I had to drop out of semester 2 and that was 2-3 years ago now. If I put that on the application, there not going to look at that as someone who doesn't have drive enough to complete something, almost see it as a black spot on my history. I'm apply in late March early April, and I desperately trying to find a way to get a leg up on the competition, although this is something I should have done 5 or so months ago.
 

OldSolduer

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resolute said:
In truth, MOST trades that I have witnessed in the CF have a variable amount of time spent doing "non-core" activities.  As a physician, I'm lucky that most of my time is spent practicing medicine (at least, at the Captain level).  But other trades, for example, the GDNO's (General Duty Nursing Officer's) sometimes spent months at a time posted to administrative positions, where they function almost interchangeably like HCA's (Health Care Administrators) doing coordinating tasks, answering e-mails, filling out performance evaluations on subordinates, etc.  Just the thought of all that admin is nauseating to me (of course, some people amazingly actually LIKE it, which is good for them I guess).  Now that I think of it, the above admin positions also exist for medics, although they might still get out to the field for a month or so every so often.

This happens everywhere and its unavoidable.  Even as an MO you may be required to perform admin functions, like PDRs on your MedTechs.

One Principle of Leadership you should NEVER ignore:

Know your troops and promote their welfare.

This means as a leader, you have to ensure their admin needs are taken care of.
 

jmlane

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Jim Seggie said:
[...]
One Principle of Leadership you should NEVER ignore:

Know your troops and promote their welfare.

This means as a leader, you have to ensure their admin needs are taken care of.
Very valid consideration, however the leadership aspect may not apply to a new MedTech with no subordinates. They may just want to learn their trade and hone their skills without being stuck doing admin duty that was mentioned in passing on their job description and not honestly disclosed by the CFRC staff. I realize there is a lot of so-called busy work that many CF member have to take on because somebody has got to do it. It may be a very frustrating 2-3 years for a member that did not have a clear idea of how often or likely this situation will be during the recruiting phase.
 

OldSolduer

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jmlane said:
Very valid consideration, however the leadership aspect may not apply to a new MedTech with no subordinates. They may just want to learn their trade and hone their skills without being stuck doing admin duty that was mentioned in passing on their job description and not honestly disclosed by the CFRC staff. I realize there is a lot of so-called busy work that many CF member have to take on because somebody has got to do it. It may be a very frustrating 2-3 years for a member that did not have a clear idea of how often or likely this situation will be during the recruiting phase.

I was referring to Medical Officers, not MedTechs right out of TQ3. Medical Officers need to learn that they may have subordinates at some point in their career, such as Unit MO.
 

medicineman

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jmlane said:
Very valid consideration, however the leadership aspect may not apply to a new MedTech with no subordinates. They may just want to learn their trade and hone their skills without being stuck doing admin duty that was mentioned in passing on their job description and not honestly disclosed by the CFRC staff. I realize there is a lot of so-called busy work that many CF member have to take on because somebody has got to do it. It may be a very frustrating 2-3 years for a member that did not have a clear idea of how often or likely this situation will be during the recruiting phase.

Part of your job is soldiering - and doing maintenance on your vehicle, your weapons, radios and equipment is part of that.  If you're reordering supplies, use some initiative and learn something about the drugs or equipment that's getting ordered, etc.  Medical admin duties are part of your job description as well, and it's in the recruiting pamphlet - it sucks, but is a necessary evil.  It's only UFI if you let it be.

:2c: from someone that was frustrated then opened their eyes.

MM
 

mariomike

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medicineman said:
Medical admin duties are part of your job description as well, and it's in the recruiting pamphlet - it sucks, but is a necessary evil.  It's only UFI if you let it be.

:2c: from someone that was frustrated then opened their eyes.

MM

It's all pensionable time.  :)
 

BadgerTrapper

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I've nothing wrong with doing maintenance duty or "Soldiering" as you call it as long as I get some time out in the field, on ex, Range time etc. My main focus is on performing actual, medical duties and treatment. Initial care upon injury, that kind of thing.
 
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aesop081

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jmlane said:
I realize there is a lot of so-called busy work that many CF member have to take on

Maintaining vehicles and equipment that are necessary in order for your unit to accomplish its mission is not "busy work".
 
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