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New Canadian Shipbuilding Strategy

Kirkhill

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It is common place for industries of all types to build modules that will fit in ISO container footprints.
 

YZT580

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Why build parts of one ship here there and everywhere when Seaspan could sub-contract a couple of the multitude of coast guard ships say one complete design to Heddle allowing them the economies of scale and focus on the Dief. in Vancouver.  Same result, less freight.  Heddle can barge modules between Thunder Bay, Hamilton and St. Catharines quite easily and St. Catharines already has a hall in place big enough for just about any size module you can think of.
 

Navy_Pete

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The issue there is the size of the Polar exceeds the max size for the St. Lawrence locks. They could build it, but not get it out of the Great Lakes.  I suppose they could do final assembly somewhere on the East Coast, but the NSS contract is specifically for the Vancouver shipyard (with subcontractor support across Canada).

For context, 'modules' is a really generic term. It can be anything from a pallet with a piece of kit on it to the whole bow. Both shipyards already have a bunch of stuff fabricated off site, so the only unique thing here is that this may be a bit more integrated then what they do right now for overall scope, and also that Heddle was specifically shut out of bidding on this by the requirements from the GoC.

Didn't see this coming at all, but probably guarantees that they can't sole source it to Davie without facing a big legal challenge. Even if Davie gets it eventually, probably means they will have to sharpen their pencils and do more of the NSS yard upgrades then planned so it's an apple-to-apple comparison against Seaspan.

Would be great if Damen was onboard generally though; sure that would benefit Seaspan as well.
 

Kirkhill

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YZT580 said:
Why build parts of one ship here there and everywhere when Seaspan could sub-contract a couple of the multitude of coast guard ships say one complete design to Heddle allowing them the economies of scale and focus on the Dief. in Vancouver.  Same result, less freight.  Heddle can barge modules between Thunder Bay, Hamilton and St. Catharines quite easily and St. Catharines already has a hall in place big enough for just about any size module you can think of.

Not a bad plan either.

Be nice it we could have a plan and stick to it.  There was a plan.  One that would have had Seaspan built an icebreaker.

The issue has never been one of capacity.  The issue was entirely one of politics and money.  Now, with the printing presses being replaced by electrons in no f**king way is money a credible issue anymore - for good or ill.

The only remaining factor is politics.  And these days politics is all about personalities.

F**kemall!
 

MTShaw

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MilEME09 said:
What does Damen bring to the table for Seaspan?

Build and repair in the east pacific. As a builder and an engineering company, they are stuck around Europe.
 

Good2Golf

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Waiting for Davie to collaborate with SNC Lavelin...
 

OceanBonfire

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Government of Canada awards contract to support Halifax-class ship maintenance

June 29, 2020

As outlined in Canada’s defence policy, Strong, Secure, Engaged, the Government of Canada is committed to equipping the Canadian Armed Forces with modern and capable equipment needed to support its operations. This includes supporting the Royal Canadian Navy’s (RCN) fleet of combat vessels to ensure they remain operationally effective and capable until the transition to its future fleet is complete.

Today, the Government of Canada announced the award of an in-service support contract to Fleetway Inc. of Halifax, Nova Scotia. Valued at $72.6 million for the first six years, with options to extend for up to 22 years, this contract will provide a full range of technical data management and systems engineering support services for the RCN’s fleet of Halifax-class ships. This contract will secure an expert team to store and manage thousands of critical ship documents, in addition to producing complex designs to support the installation of new equipment on board the ships. Their specialized knowledge and skills will make sure key information is up-to-date to support maintenance teams, and will enable the maintenance of the Halifax-class operational capability in support of CAF missions.

Awarded as part of the National Shipbuilding Strategy, this contract will ensure that the RCN and supporting shipyards continue to have the technical data required to support ongoing ship maintenance during planned docking work periods, while also providing local economic benefits. Work for the contract began in April 2020, and will continue until the fleet is retired in the early 2040s. This contract is expected to sustain an estimated 140 Canadian jobs.

...


https://www.canada.ca/en/department-national-defence/news/2020/06/government-of-canada-awards-contract-to-support-halifax-class-ship-maintenance.html
 

Navy_Pete

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For context, Fleetway has been doing this for ages, and also used to do this for the 280s and tankers. Amongst other things, they maintain the technical data package and drawings for each ship, as well as do up engineering changes and other similar engineering things on a task basis.

Each ship has it's own set of drawings for the most part, and there is a lot of work to put together the info packages for things like the docking work packages. They fall under Irving corporation, but are more of a small engineering firm with the HQ in Ottawa and satellites in both coasts. From my personal experience, they do a good job, and for stuff like this it's good to have the same people responsible for the files, as there is a lot of background history to keep track of.

For AOPs and JSS, this work is part of the AJISS contract, and the same kind of stuff for MCDVs and auxiliary boats is under that ISSC (and think Babcock does it for the subs). Bringing back in house would probably need a few hundred extra people in MEPM and the coasts, and we'd still need to contract some expertise for specific design tasks anyway. Plus would mean yet another change to the role of LCMMs, so would probably need more of them as well for the extra work (and most are covering a few extra slots already).

Probably arguments both ways if it's good value, but this was a decision made back in the 90s so not something we could easily roll back.
 

don3wing

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Seaspan has launched the 3rd Coast Guard OFSV:


DR. BONNIE HENRY OFFICIALLY LAUNCHES THE FUTURE COAST GUARD VESSEL CCGS JOHN CABOT AT SEASPAN SHIPYARDS IN VANCOUVER
THIRD OFFSHORE FISHERIES SCIENCE VESSEL BUILT AT SEASPAN SHIPYARDS ENTERS THE WATER AT 97% COMPLETE, EXCEEDING INTERNATIONAL BENCHMARKS FOR COMPLETION AT LAUNCH AND REFLECTING EXCEPTIONAL AND INNOVATIVE SHIPBUILDING DURING GLOBAL PANDEMIC.
North Vancouver, BC – On Friday, July 3, under strict COVID-19 public health requirements and protocols, Dr. Bonnie Henry, British Columbia’s Provincial Health Officer, joined a small number of Seaspan Shipyards employees and special guests to break the customary bottle of champagne against the bow of the future CCGS John Cabot, officially launching the third state-of-the-art Offshore Fisheries Science Vessel (OFSV) for the Canadian Coast Guard.

The July launch of the future CCGS John Cabot is a particularly impressive achievement given that construction was completed during the COVID-19 pandemic. Seaspan Shipyards significantly adapted its normal operations to continue building the ship while ensuring the health and well-being of employees, customers, partners and the community.

The traditional public celebration was scaled back to a skeleton launch party including Dr. Henry, Tsleil-Waututh elder Margaret George, representatives from the Canadian Coast Guard, and the handful of employees needed to launch the vessel.

Dr. Henry, who began her career as a medical officer with the Royal Canadian Navy, was invited by Seaspan to officially launch the vessel in recognition of her exceptional leadership and tireless efforts to keep British Columbians safe during the COVID-19 pandemic and to slow the spread of the virus in Canada. Video of Dr. Henry officially launching the ship, along with special messages from several government representatives and the Canadian Coast Guard, was released today.



More than 1,200 Seaspan Shipyards employees and more than 400 Canadian small and medium-sized companies and their thousands of employees across the country contributed to the construction of this world-class vessel, which entered the water on July 3 at 97% complete, a rare accomplishment and a high-water mark for the best shipbuilders in the world.

The CCGS John Cabot, the CCGS Capt Jacques Cartier and the CCGS Sir John Franklin are the first class of ships built under the National Shipbuilding Strategy (NSS), the Government of Canada’s strategy to renew the fleets of the Canadian Coast Guard and Royal Canadian Navy. Two ships have been delivered and the third launched from Seaspan’s Vancouver shipyard in just 13 months.

Consistent with the social and economic objectives of the NSS, Seaspan Shipyards has become a growing economic engine for the domestic marine industry. With more than $1.5 billion contributed to date to Canada’s GDP (Source: Deloitte Socio-economic Impact Study, February 2020), Seaspan Shipyards is rebuilding a marine industrial sector on Canada’s West Coast and generating economic impact across Canada through job creation and contracts with hundreds of small and medium-sized businesses. As a result of the NSS, Seaspan Shipyards has become one of the most modern shipyards in North America, with a skilled 2,700-person shipbuilding team and the shipyard capacity and purpose-built infrastructure to deliver Canada’s non-combat fleet.

QUOTES
“Congratulations to Seaspan on the launch of the future CCGS John Cabot, the third Offshore Fisheries Science Vessel for the Canadian Coast Guard. Today’s launch marks an important milestone in the renewal of our Coast Guard fleet. Together, we’re ensuring that Canada has the ships we need to continue to keep mariners safe, protect our marine environment and provide a state-of-the-art platform for critical scientific research.”
– The Honourable Bernadette Jordan, Minister of Fisheries, Oceans, and the Canadian Coast Guard

“This is a critical step and milestone in the process of delivering this vessel to the Canadian Coast Guard. The three Offshore Fisheries Science Vessels, which were specifically designed and built in British Columbia, will enable Fisheries and Oceans and the Coast Guard to continue conducting and supporting critically important scientific and research work, including gaining more data on the impacts of climate change on our waters and marine environments.”
– The Honourable Anita Anand, Minister of Public Services and Procurement

“The Seaspan Shipyards team is incredibly proud to launch the future CCGS John Cabot, our third Offshore Fisheries Science Vessel. It is a great honour to have such an exceptional leader as Dr. Bonnie Henry help launch this ship. Her leadership and clarity gave us the confidence, in an unprecedented climate, to continue our operations safely, which led to today’s successful launch.”
– Mark Lamarre, Chief Executive Officer, Seaspan Shipyards

“It is an honour to be part of the launch of the CCGS John Cabot Canadian Coast Guard vessel, on which important research to protect our oceans will be undertaken for many years to come. For the Seaspan team to complete the construction in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, with all protective measures in place, is a testament to how British Columbians have done all they can to protect our province, while working to keep many important aspects of our economy going.”
– Dr. Bonnie Henry, Provincial Health Officer, Province of British Columbia

QUICK FACTS: CCGS JOHN CABOT
Measuring 63.4 metres, the CCGS John Cabot will be one of the most advanced and capable ships of its size and type in the world.
CCGS John Cabot is the third Offshore Fisheries Science Vessel (OFSV) built and launched by Seaspan Shipyards under the National Shipbuilding Strategy. Her sister ships, the CCGS Sir John Franklin, now stationed in Victoria, British Columbia, and the CCGS Capt Jacques Cartier, stationed in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, are already in service.
Following sea trials and upon delivery to the Coast Guard, anticipated later this summer, the CCGS John Cabot will be based in St. John’s, Newfoundland and Labrador.
The OFSV is fully equipped to support Fisheries and Oceans scientists in the collection and analysis of data on Canada’s marine ecosystems and the impacts of climate change. This floating laboratory features a full suite of state-of-the-art systems, including a deployable sensor-laden drop keel, high-tech fishing trawls and four science labs — a wet lab, a dry lab, an ocean lab and a control lab.
The OFSVs support scientific research through work such as:
performing fishing and acoustic surveys of fish and invertebrates;
collecting information on the abundance and distribution of marine species; and
collecting data on marine ecosystems and the impacts of human activity on fisheries resources and ecosystem health.
The OFSVs, although primarily focused on science and research, also have the capability to support search and rescue, and environmental response and operations as required.

https://nss.seaspan.com/featured-news/dr-bonnie-henry-officially-launches-the-future-coast-guard-vessel-ccgs-john-cabot-at-seaspan-shipyards-in-vancouver/?utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter&utm_campaign=ofsv3july2020
 

Spencer100

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https://www.facebook.com/IrvingShipbuildingInc/photos/a.2783053615083158/3097384726983377/?type=3&eid=ARC8NaKKIFb1MRc40LmOXmiB9jkgKG-B05ohUS7RmsYb4zBOcHfUjK2fRnc2fY_2pQg3rBHlzIXG5cOF&__xts__%5B0%5D=68.ARDcxFBn-kiVD7BLyh_UFhi-FqrDkDLaWWJ4uitq7WAl2LqywlGmz0d4ct2LRc32DuwD9M62YJHkhdjvJq_lWQco2B6ClLPRsGWVIUcB3tAzjJ50qZGk-tkz8JmlCaVqPOcBPTuRaPBNAaAeaxbzd8nqrYhYTIvDNdLjehzds_yOJGOspt3Z13WAo1bMkyMqSAE0WEBzdzZ9LlNOatJv4UknUUHLXD1T3J-IG0FoQcrjqJMJ6Oja9vxr2yR62qr4rCfTs7ucCBJFSZW407ogL4R7ky5MJeL6WJYFbPlPngJCUnkN2vgce74JNhSCu_D0pO-PLRrVJf00pMdasTs9BEVf5A&__tn__=EHH-R

She out and about on the last tryout.
 

Spencer100

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Question in the picture of the HMCS HDW they have a orange enclosed lifeboat.  Is because it is manufactured to civilian standards?  I think I had read it was getting a Lloyds cert but not 100% sure.  But it is a full military ship and it is not required. Right? (not arguing that it should not have it for safety)

The MV Asterix is a civilian owned an operated so I get that it has the two on each side.

 

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Colin Parkinson

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Interesting discussion with someone involved with the JSS build. Seaspan has faced delays as the manufacturers could not get raw materials to produce sub components on time to be delivered so the blocks could stay on schedule. This is due to COVID-19 impacts all along the supply chain. Some of the blocks are missing pieces that have been delayed that will have to be fitted later.
 

Stoker

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Spencer100 said:
Question in the picture of the HMCS HDW they have a orange enclosed lifeboat.  Is because it is manufactured to civilian standards?  I think I had read it was getting a Lloyds cert but not 100% sure.  But it is a full military ship and it is not required. Right? (not arguing that it should not have it for safety)

The MV Asterix is a civilian owned an operated so I get that it has the two on each side.

Yes she's getting a Lloyd's certification much as same as the Kingston Class, its a quasi civilian standard/military standard ship.
 

Underway

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Spencer100 said:
Question in the picture of the HMCS HDW they have a orange enclosed lifeboat.  Is because it is manufactured to civilian standards?  I think I had read it was getting a Lloyds cert but not 100% sure.  But it is a full military ship and it is not required. Right? (not arguing that it should not have it for safety)

The MV Asterix is a civilian owned an operated so I get that it has the two on each side.

Chief Engineer said:
Yes she's getting a Lloyd's certification much as same as the Kingston Class, its a quasi civilian standard/military standard ship.

Also arctic...
 

Underway

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Chief Engineer said:
She'll get a Polar Code correct?

That was the plan.  Well see when it all washes out,  not as close the project as I once was.
 

Good2Golf

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Chief Engineer said:
She'll get a Polar Code correct?

PC 5 advertised, no?

Interesting that there are a number of Canadian commercial vessels that exceed that rating...I saw Discovery TV’s Mega Ships episode on FedNav’s UMIAK and followed up to see her sister ship NUNAVIK was built and certified to PC 4.  I see the HDW doesn’t have an ice guard rudder configuration.
 

Stoker

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Good2Golf said:
PC 5 advertised, no?

Interesting that there are a number of Canadian commercial vessels that exceed that rating...I saw Discovery TV’s Mega Ships episode on FedNav’s UMIAK and followed up to see her sister ship NUNAVIK was built and certified to PC 4.  I see the HDW doesn’t have an ice guard rudder configuration.

PC4 bow and PC5 hull. 120cm of first year ice.
 
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