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New Canadian Shipbuilding Strategy

Czech_pivo

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This is what happens when you wait to the last moment to replace your ships

Sadly you have to wonder if we'll be reading similar stories about the Halifax's in 15yrs or so.
 

Uzlu

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Colin Parkinson

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I am sure Davie has 60 million dollar solution as opposed to the 20 million dollar fix. Sounds like a poker game is underway.
 

Navy_Pete

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I am sure Davie has 60 million dollar solution as opposed to the 20 million dollar fix. Sounds like a poker game is underway.
Honestly I'm less than impressed with their repair work. Some pretty basic things are lacking. Repacking valve stems, limiting the spread of blasting grit etc are all pretty fundamental. I'm not sure they have the horsepower to do that kind of life extension and keep up with the CPF DWP commitments, and one of their buildings burned down recently.

Pretty interesting PR move though, someone really needs to tell them to knock it off. Their NSS ads were funny, but pretty unprofessional, and their track record is widely exaggerated.

Hopefully there are some other shipyards that can take this on (maybe Heddle, with it's partnership with the East Coast site?).
 

Spencer100

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Honestly I'm less than impressed with their repair work. Some pretty basic things are lacking. Repacking valve stems, limiting the spread of blasting grit etc are all pretty fundamental. I'm not sure they have the horsepower to do that kind of life extension and keep up with the CPF DWP commitments, and one of their buildings burned down recently.

Pretty interesting PR move though, someone really needs to tell them to knock it off. Their NSS ads were funny, but pretty unprofessional, and their track record is widely exaggerated.

Hopefully there are some other shipyards that can take this on (maybe Heddle, with it's partnership with the East Coast site?).
I don't think Heddle would touch it LOL Been there done that.

 

Navy_Pete

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Also has the Hudson even had much sea time after that disaster?
Right, thanks, forgot about that.

Sounded like a bit of things went bad with some repairs, but also that they kept finding problems after problem after the Heddle repair unrelated to the refit;

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/generator-failure-ccgs-hudson-1.6124822

From personal experience even with detailed surveys you'll get things pop up as you start opening things up, but honestly a $20M price tag is still pretty low for that kind of basic work. A single major steel repair can easily start getting close to a million (or more). If they are doing engine repairs, HVAC work etc plus remediation work for asbestos and lead, that's not a whole lot.
 

Stoker

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I am sure Davie has 60 million dollar solution as opposed to the 20 million dollar fix. Sounds like a poker game is underway.
That article is from a few years ago when Davie was doing some maneuvering trying to be the good guy and get more government work although I'm sure they'll try and use this to their advantage and drop some sort of cheap design or conversion to save the day.
 

Colin Parkinson

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That article is from a few years ago when Davie was doing some maneuvering trying to be the good guy and get more government work although I'm sure they'll try and use this to their advantage and drop some sort of cheap design or conversion to save the day.
I must be misunderstanding your post, the blog I posted was from Jan 19/22?
 

Colin Parkinson

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More bad news for the CCG, Coast Guard icebreaker Pierre Radisson, was struck from behind by the vessel it was escorting through the ice.

1642888797979.png
 

MarkOttawa

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The gangs that couldn't get shipbuilding straight:

Ottawa’s talks with Quebec shipyard to build much needed icebreakers shrouded in fog​

Questions are swirling over yet another delay in Ottawa’s nearly $100-billion plan to rebuild the fleets of Canada’s navy and coast guard — only this time the delay isn’t due to the stalled construction of a ship.

The federal government announced in December 2019 that Quebec shipyard Chantier Davie was the only company to qualify for a piece of that work, namely the construction of six much-needed icebreakers for the Canadian Coast Guard.

Yet while that announcement kicked off negotiations toward an agreement Davie and its supporters in Quebec and Ottawa had long demanded, the subsequent discussions remain shrouded in fog more than two years later.

The delay is fuelling fears about the Canadian Coast Guard’s aging fleet, which shrunk by another ship this week with the forced retirement of a 59-year-old science vessel, leaving Canada without a dedicated platform for ocean research.

“You really kind of wonder what’s going on that it’s been this long after having made such a high-profile commitment,” said David Perry, president of the Canadian Global Affairs Institute and one of Canada’s top procurement experts.

READ MORE: Cost of used icebreakers Ottawa is purchasing from Quebec shipyard nears $1B mark

“And delivery on all the work that falls under them has got to be significantly impacted by not having come to an agreement.”

Davie was first excluded from the shipbuilding plan following a competition in 2011 that selected Irving Shipbuilding in Halifax to build the navy’s new warships, and Seaspan to build two new naval support ships and the brunt of the coast guard’s new fleet.

The Quebec shipyard was able to pick up some piecemeal work, including the construction of two federal ferries and the provision of several second-hand ships for the navy and coast guard. Those included a supply vessel for the navy and three used icebreakers...

Meanwhile Finnish yard will build honking big breaker for Russian company in three years. Go figure:

Finnish shipbuilders contract powerful icebreaker for Russian Arctic​

It is the most powerful icebreaker ever built in Finland.

The vessel that is designed for breaking through the sea-ice of the Yenisey River and Kara Sea will be of big importance for Nornickel’s expanded ore shipments from the Taymyr Peninsula.

It is designed by Aker Arctic and built by the Helsinki Shipyard on a contract with Nornickel, the Russian mining and metallurgy company. It will be able to break through 2 meter thick snow-covered ice.

The icebreaker’s mission is to escort Nornickel’s Arctic Express bulk carriers, as well as cargo ships with up to 20 000 tons deadweight. It will have facilities for transporting cargo and supporting helicopter operations.

The ship design has been successfully tested at Aker Arctic’s ice lab in Helsinki and construction is due to start in the coming weeks. The Helsinki Shipyard has already completed purchasing contracts for the main equipment for machinery and propulsion, the partners inform.

It will have an integrated dual-fuel diesel-electric power plant, which can use both LNG and low-sulphur diesel oil. Emissions as fuel with good energy efficiency is high and emissions low...

Delivery by 2024

Ship construction must be completed by the end of 2024, says Senior Vice President Sergei Dubovitsky...
finn.jpg

Mark
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Colin Parkinson

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I don't recall this being posted earlier, not good for getting other international orders


But last year, Seaspan's Victoria Shipyards, which was subcontracted by Lockheed to perform the work, filed a civil claim in B.C. Supreme Court alleging that problems with the Lockheed designs were costing the shipyard more than $20 million in delays and workarounds on the first ship alone.

Lockheed Martin Canada responded with a counterclaim, saying the project delays were due to negligence, understaffing and mismanagement at the shipyard.
 

Halifax Tar

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Might need to start churning these ships out a little faster...

Now, where did we leave those drawings for the Flower Class...
 

FSTO

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I don't recall this being posted earlier, not good for getting other international orders


But last year, Seaspan's Victoria Shipyards, which was subcontracted by Lockheed to perform the work, filed a civil claim in B.C. Supreme Court alleging that problems with the Lockheed designs were costing the shipyard more than $20 million in delays and workarounds on the first ship alone.

Lockheed Martin Canada responded with a counterclaim, saying the project delays were due to negligence, understaffing and mismanagement at the shipyard.
I heard some rumbling from the Kiwi's that they were "unsatisfied" in the work done on their ships. Nothing official though.
 

MilEME09

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I don't recall this being posted earlier, not good for getting other international orders


But last year, Seaspan's Victoria Shipyards, which was subcontracted by Lockheed to perform the work, filed a civil claim in B.C. Supreme Court alleging that problems with the Lockheed designs were costing the shipyard more than $20 million in delays and workarounds on the first ship alone.

Lockheed Martin Canada responded with a counterclaim, saying the project delays were due to negligence, understaffing and mismanagement at the shipyard.
Oh boy would that have implications for the NSS if Lockhart wins.
 

Humphrey Bogart

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I heard some rumbling from the Kiwi's that they were "unsatisfied" in the work done on their ships. Nothing official though.
You mean they weren't happy with the quality of work done by our highly skilled and professional workforce. 😆

Done to the best industry standards I would imagine with excellent craftsmanship 😁
 
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