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New U.S. Study: "Military rank affects medical care, offering societal insights"

The Bread Guy

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Zero idea if this can be applied/seen in the CF medical system, but interesting how these guys suggest the dynamics may transfer to civilian settings - this from the study ...
... we provide careful, rigorous evidence of the “long shadow” of power: the idea that power in one domain of life can spill over to unrelated domains (here, from the military to the clinical), causing distortions in behavior and resource allocation in both. Furthermore, we show that the powerful may unwittingly “steal” resources from less-powerful individuals, in line with other research showing negative spillovers from dominant to marginalized groups in shared spaces ...
... and this from the story ...
Screenshot 2024-05-18 065427.jpg
Study available here, as well as lots of supplementary material here - study also attached as PDF in case other links don't work for you.
 

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In other news, water is wet…

This is literally unremarkable and happens everywhere and every facet of life- not just the military.

Except, in civilian life, one does not have the power to throw the other in jail - or ruin their career etc.
 
The topic could make for interesting discussion, or at a minimum a good slagging of "rank has its privileges". While looking for similar, older studies I came across a couple of interesting journal articles.

The Pervasive Role of Rank in the Health of U.S. Veterans
Abstract
The following article tests the hypothesis that veterans have better health if they were officers when they were in the U.S. military than if they served in the enlisted ranks. It examines this hypothesis by presenting results from logistic regressions that are based on four surveys: the National Survey of Veterans, the Survey of Retired Military, the Panel Study of Income Dynamics, and the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study. In all four of these surveys, the evidence is consistent with the hypothesis that military rank is associated with health, particularly among veterans who served longer. It also suggests that the health gradient by rank is independent of similar gradients by education and income as well as health differences by race. These findings indicate that health may be influenced not just by differences in civilian society but also by those in the military.

And to anticipate the usual skew to "buttons and bows" . . .

Impact of Military Physician Rank and Appearance on Patient Perceptions of Clinical Competency in a Primary Care Setting
ABSTRACT
The patient–physician interaction is an important aspect of primary care medicine. Few studies have investigated the military specific factors that influence these interactions. Using a cross-sectional survey, we evaluated the impact of physician rank and attire on a patient's confidence in their physician's medical abilities and willingness to disclose personal information. Patient perception was assessed in the domains of (1) confidence in physician's medical abilities and (2) comfort discussing sexual, psychological, and personal problems with a physician. Our results found physicians of higher rank showing a higher positive impact on patient's confidence compared to lower ranks (p < 0.0001). Patients were less comfortable discussing sexual (p = 0.001), psychological (p < 0.0001), and personal (p = 0.005) problems with an O-3 (Air Force Captain) than higher ranked physicians. Casual business attire negatively affected patient's confidence in their physician's abilities and in their comfort discussing sexual, psychological, and personal problems (p < 0.0001). Removing resident physician data did not significantly alter results. This pilot study on military rank and appearance shows a statistically significant impact to patient–physician interactions. Lower rank and casual attire is statistically detrimental to the patient's perception of their physician's abilities irrespective of resident physician involvement.
 
That power does not exist in the military, either. Contrary to popular myth.

My point- wealthy/powerful/high status people will always get better service.
Funny a fellow officer and I had similar discussion the other day. We came to the conclusion that inmates received better health care than seniors.
 
Funny a fellow officer and I had similar discussion the other day. We came to the conclusion that inmates received better health care than seniors.
Had friends that were federal screws in Kingston - apparently they are supposed to be seen within 72 hours for primary care things and if something requires specialist care, must be seen considerably sooner than you or I would get in to be seen...I want to say he said 14 days, mind you that was 20+ years ago.
 
Had friends that were federal screws in Kingston - apparently they are supposed to be seen within 72 hours for primary care things and if something requires specialist care, must be seen considerably sooner than you or I would get in to be seen...I want to say he said 14 days, mind you that was 20+ years ago.
Still pretty much the same. We had an old bank robber from the US - he had cancer and was sent out for chemo every few days.

ONE was supposed to die of COVID but miracles happen - he survived it.
 
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