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OCdt Speaks at Freedom Rally

Halifax Tar

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Which is what this thread is actually about!
back to the future GIF



Have we gone so far off the tracks that we've come back on the tracks ?
 

Navy_Pete

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That’s a serious leadership failure.

To not have a seaworthiness program (or whatever the correct term is), is one thing.

To HAVE a seaworthiness program, and disregard it is an entirely different issue.

Folks can dis the airworthiness (operational, technical, investigative) program(s), but it’s borne of blood, and to its credit, the RCAF takes few things, if anything, more seriously.
To be fair air worthiness is much easier, as there is a much larger user base and support for doing it for specific airframes, with OEMs etc all involved. Big fan of the airworthiness program, but they do have a massive support infrastructure/culture behind it.

Submarines use the same level of scrutiny, but takes hundreds of people to figure out. The big difference is the operational side listens if the technical side says it's a bad idea, and frequently things just get fixed. On the surface side you have to prove it's unsafe, which is a ridiculous standard when everything is scheduled so last minute and HR to even look at the results is a premium.

You do have a lot more tolerance for things going poorly on a surface ship, but we still push way past it, and the RCN doesn't even follow it's own rules. If anyone thinks we have a robust risk management process in place they are kidding themselves; it's basic AF and we don't look at cumulative impacts, which is kind of important when you have 1500+ known defects per ship, plus a lot of other known issues that aren't written down, and then the things you don't know about or can't really quantify.

I think people refusing to sail would be a better way for things to come to a head than a literal disaster, as the Navy didn't even acknowledge that FRE was a best case scenario for that fire and most other ships wouldn't have been able to do the same response because of equipment issues and lack of people onboard.
 

Good2Golf

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To be fair air worthiness is much easier, as there is a much larger user base and support for doing it for specific airframes, with OEMs etc all involved. Big fan of the airworthiness program, but they do have a massive support infrastructure/culture behind it.

I would say “more culturally supported” but I certainly wouldn’t say easier…the confluence area between airworthiness authorities, OEMs, suppliers, operators, maintainers and sustainers is not insignificant, nor easy to get firing on all cylinders.


I think people refusing to sail would be a better way for things to come to a head than a literal disaster, as the Navy didn't even acknowledge that FRE was a best case scenario for that fire and most other ships wouldn't have been able to do the same response because of equipment issues and lack of people onboard.
Yup! This one gets me…have/had personal interest in things FRE at the time, and that fact that it’s one of the ones in better condition is appalling. FRE, PRO, etc… 🤦🏻
 

NavyShooter

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8 years ago, copies of the Mainguy report were appearing in messes on a certain RCN ship. I found one in the C&PO's...turns out there were more left on photocopiers and in other various spots. They never did find who was doing it.

The parallels from the time of the report to current times were...shocking.

Death of a thousand cuts though...a slice at a time is barely noticeable.
 

KevinB

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8 years ago, copies of the Mainguy report were appearing in messes on a certain RCN ship. I found one in the C&PO's...turns out there were more left on photocopiers and in other various spots. They never did find who was doing it.

The parallels from the time of the report to current times were...shocking.

Death of a thousand cuts though...a slice at a time is barely noticeable.
Boiling Frog…
 

kev994

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To be fair air worthiness is much easier, as there is a much larger user base and support for doing it for specific airframes, with OEMs etc all involved. Big fan of the airworthiness program, but they do have a massive support infrastructure/culture behind it.
It helps when there’s money to be made. For instance, we need to pay Lockmart a large sum if $ to figure out how much it’s going to cost to decide on the airworthiness of the proposed Walmart kettle. It’s going to take a lot of kettles to hit a break even point on that project.
 

Eye In The Sky

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Just use the RCAF's catering budget and go the route of the USAF:

Lawmaker Chides Air Force for Buying Expensive Coffee Cups​

Lawmaker Chides Air Force for Buying Expensive Coffee Cups

Sen. Chuck Grassley...not sure what he knows, but he would be better to stick to that stuff. I'm guessing...like shadow puppets n stuff.

😁

Hot cups for the win!!!

I'd love to see his expense account of his term in office.
 

OldSolduer

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8 years ago, copies of the Mainguy report were appearing in messes on a certain RCN ship. I found one in the C&PO's...turns out there were more left on photocopiers and in other various spots. They never did find who was doing it.

The parallels from the time of the report to current times were...shocking.

Death of a thousand cuts though...a slice at a time is barely noticeable.
I read some of that report and the RCN appeared to copy the RN - only worse.
 

Blackadder1916

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8 years ago, copies of the Mainguy report were appearing in messes on a certain RCN ship. I found one in the C&PO's...turns out there were more left on photocopiers and in other various spots. They never did find who was doing it.

The parallels from the time of the report to current times were...shocking.

Death of a thousand cuts though...a slice at a time is barely noticeable.

And for those who may be interested in what it said.

 
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