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Reconstitution

Furniture

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Retired GOFO sends... again.

He's clearly been too long at the Port (and Starboard) bottle ;)

Comment: The military should focus on protecting Canada​


Canada should reorganize its Armed Forces to focus more on its first two missions: first to defend Canada and second to defend North America.

Roger Cyr, OMM, CD

A commentary by a retired naval commander who lives in Victoria.

The Canadian Forces should focus on protecting Canada. The mission of the Forces is to provide combat-effective, multi-purpose forces at home and abroad to protect Canada and Canadians, the first element is to defend Canada, the second is to defend North America, and the third is contribute to international peace and security.

Defending Canada includes assisting civil authorities in responding to a wide range of threats, from natural disasters to terrorist attacks.

Canada is not a major military-oriented country, it supports a rather modest level of military forces that are somewhat diffidently equipped. This has always been the norm in the past, except when world situations required nations to boost their military involvement for the common good.

Canada’s military then came to the forefront in situations such as the Second World War, the Cold War, and various United Nations and NATO peacekeeping initiatives. The country then went on a military build-up that was truly astonishing, given the rather diminutive size of its regular military and defence industries.

Looking at the Second World War, at the start in 1939, the Royal Canadian Navy consisted of 13 combat ships. But when the war ended six years later, it had more than 450 ships.

Of course, the ships of those days do not reflect the superior technology of today’s ships. But then again, the shipyards that built them did not have the industrial capabilities of today’s yards. After the war, the Canadian military and defence industries shrunk to their peacetime levels.

Over the past numerous decades, Canada has relied on a relatively small military force during normal times, but when situations required a buildup, this was undertaken readily. However, the country does not appear to be facing a world crisis at this time and would not appear to need to go to a catastrophic acquisition of combat-capable systems.

The North Warning System upgrade is a normal defence and surveillance action that needs to take place to ensure the protection of Canada and the United States.

The NWS is a joint American and Canadian early-warning radar system for the atmospheric air defence of North America. It provides surveillance of airspace from potential incursions or attacks from across North America’s polar region. It replaced the Distant Early Warning Line system in the late 1980s.

The NWS consists of both long-range and short-range surveillance radars, operated and maintained by NORAD. There are 13 long-range sites and 36 short-range sites. In Canada, the station sites are owned or leased by the government of Canada, which also owns most of the infrastructure.

Canada should curtail acquiring major weapon systems at this time since there are no global requirements. This would happen, as it did in the past, when a need materializes.

It should now reorganize its Armed Forces to focus more on the first two missions, first to defend Canada and second to defend North America. The first mission should include responsibility for aid to the civil authorities, such as search and rescue, and the physical protection of the homeland from a law-and-order perspective.

The structure and resource allocation of the Forces should emphasize the first and most vital mission, which is to defend and protect Canada.
In past years, when disaster struck Canadian regions, some military personnel were seen helping as best they could to provide assistance to local authorities. For floods, we saw some members filling sandbags with a shovel, or we may have seen some rescuing people with inflatable boats.
These military rescues should be seen as a true military operation. The rescue missions should reflect military might and should be shown as resourceful, effective and precise.

After all, this is really Canada’s last effort against disasters and unrest and should be attacked by the military in that context. The Forces must accordingly structure and resource itself to cover its critical home front role.

As for the defence of the continent, this should be handled in co-operation with the United States and the NWS. The U.S. has the resources and capabilities, Canada does not. A treaty should be concluded with the U.S. to that effect.

It is ludicrous to think that Canada could provide for the defence of its territory from a major power such as Russia and China. Especially now that the Arctic is becoming a sought-after territory by these two world superpowers.

The U.S. is also interested in the Arctic, but it would certainly not be confrontational to Canada. The third mission, contribute to international peace and security, will continue as in the past with participation in NATO and United Nations taskings.

If the world situation dictates a major buildup of weapon systems, then it will occur as it has always done in the past.

This could easily be summed up as "Retired Navy guy doesn't get the CAF, and likely never did."

I remember one of the MSE Ops driving a bus on on my TLAV course commenting that he was glad he wasn't going to Afghanistan because it wasn't a UN mission, so it wasn't what Canadian should be doing. I suspect this retired Cdr is cut from the same cloth...
 

Brian Lowe

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This could easily be summed up as "Retired Navy guy doesn't get the CAF, and likely never did."

I remember one of the MSE Ops driving a bus on on my TLAV course commenting that he was glad he wasn't going to Afghanistan because it wasn't a UN mission, so it wasn't what Canadian should be doing. I suspect this retired Cdr is cut from the same cloth...
"However, the country does not appear to be facing a world crisis at this time and would not appear to need to go to a catastrophic acquisition of combat-capable systems." - weed must be good in Vic these days.........
 

Eye In The Sky

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This could easily be summed up as "Retired Navy guy doesn't get the CAF, and likely never did."

I remember one of the MSE Ops driving a bus on on my TLAV course commenting that he was glad he wasn't going to Afghanistan because it wasn't a UN mission, so it wasn't what Canadian should be doing. I suspect this retired Cdr is cut from the same cloth...

My first big “what the hell are you talking about” was this line:

“and the physical protection of the homeland from a law-and-order perspective”

Mike Myers No GIF
 

dimsum

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"However, the country does not appear to be facing a world crisis at this time and would not appear to need to go to a catastrophic acquisition of combat-capable systems." - weed must be good in Vic these days.........
I can almost guarantee that he would be the first writing to the TC about how ill-equipped we are, if a shooting war breaks out.
 

Halifax Tar

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Someone on here must know that guy.

This could easily be summed up as "Retired Navy guy doesn't get the CAF, and likely never did."

I remember one of the MSE Ops driving a bus on on my TLAV course commenting that he was glad he wasn't going to Afghanistan because it wasn't a UN mission, so it wasn't what Canadian should be doing. I suspect this retired Cdr is cut from the same cloth...

I remember those guys. I used to bump into them too.
 

FSTO

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I'm trying to remember this Cdr Cyr. I remember a Brenda Cyr but don't know this Roger fella at all.
 

btrudy

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I'm trying to remember this Cdr Cyr. I remember a Brenda Cyr but don't know this Roger fella at all.

I thought I knew the dude, did a bit of googling to check, and found out that I was thinking of someone else but did figure out his deets.

Based upon combining a few of the mini bios included in articles he's written for the Maritime Engineering Journal, he joined as some type of NCM in 1957, CFR'd to MARS in 1971, transferred to CSE in 1973 (VOT or COT I'm not sure), and made his way to Commander before he retired in 1993.

So ... uhhhh, he'll probably be in his early 80s now and has been out for basically as long as we've had the Frigates.

Make of that what you will. I wouldn't expect many folks here to actually remember him though..
 

FSTO

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I thought I knew the dude, did a bit of googling to check, and found out that I was thinking of someone else but did figure out his deets.

Based upon combining a few of the mini bios included in articles he's written for the Maritime Engineering Journal, he joined as some type of NCM in 1957, CFR'd to MARS in 1971, transferred to CSE in 1973 (VOT or COT I'm not sure), and made his way to Commander before he retired in 1993.

So ... uhhhh, he'll probably be in his early 80s now and has been out for basically as long as we've had the Frigates.

Make of that what you will. I wouldn't expect many folks here to actually remember him though..
Brenda could be his daughter then.
 

daftandbarmy

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I'm trying to remember this Cdr Cyr. I remember a Brenda Cyr but don't know this Roger fella at all.

He writes letters to national newspapers too, and seems a big fan of the Navy's divisional system ;)

 

OldSolduer

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This could easily be summed up as "Retired Navy guy doesn't get the CAF, and likely never did."

I remember one of the MSE Ops driving a bus on on my TLAV course commenting that he was glad he wasn't going to Afghanistan because it wasn't a UN mission, so it wasn't what Canadian should be doing. I suspect this retired Cdr is cut from the same cloth...
Then said MSE Op bus driver should have been turfed. Out.

The military exists to fight wars. Anything else is secondary.
 

Halifax Tar

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I thought I knew the dude, did a bit of googling to check, and found out that I was thinking of someone else but did figure out his deets.

Based upon combining a few of the mini bios included in articles he's written for the Maritime Engineering Journal, he joined as some type of NCM in 1957, CFR'd to MARS in 1971, transferred to CSE in 1973 (VOT or COT I'm not sure), and made his way to Commander before he retired in 1993.

So ... uhhhh, he'll probably be in his early 80s now and has been out for basically as long as we've had the Frigates.

Make of that what you will. I wouldn't expect many folks here to actually remember him though..

Enlightening. Thank you.
 

Furniture

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Then said MSE Op bus driver should have been turfed. Out.

The military exists to fight wars. Anything else is secondary.
I suspect he self-select out as the fight in Kandahar continued, he seemed an older CFL.
 

daftandbarmy

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I thought I knew the dude, did a bit of googling to check, and found out that I was thinking of someone else but did figure out his deets.

Based upon combining a few of the mini bios included in articles he's written for the Maritime Engineering Journal, he joined as some type of NCM in 1957, CFR'd to MARS in 1971, transferred to CSE in 1973 (VOT or COT I'm not sure), and made his way to Commander before he retired in 1993.

So ... uhhhh, he'll probably be in his early 80s now and has been out for basically as long as we've had the Frigates.

Make of that what you will. I wouldn't expect many folks here to actually remember him though..

Retried RCN flame wars in the Letter to the Editor section.... I'm sure the local retirement homes are all abuzz with the drama ;)

World order is changing, so military is needed​


Re: “Military should focus on protecting Canada,” commentary, Jan. 21.


The author states that it is ludicrous to think that Canada should defend itself from threats such as Russia and China. This statement is illogical, as that is what countries do and Canada has historically done.

We do this by joining alliances such as NORAD, NATO and bilateral agreements with other countries. The price of joining these alliances is for Canada to provide its fair share of defence capabilities.

For decades, Canada has failed to provide such capabilities and has allowed our military to atrophy with most major capabilities rusting out before being replaced.

Canada will soon find itself shunned by our allies, who are increasing their defence spending to above two per cent of GDP while Canada spends almost half as much.

No nation can ramp up building modern military systems in the short term, and this is particularly so for Canada, as indicated in the extended time it takes to build a single warship or produce munitions.

The war in Ukraine shows that the world tomorrow can change in a blink. The head of the UN recently stated that the world is in a dark place with the world order as we have known it dissolving.

Our allies will not be amused with a Canadian military whose focus is mainly fighting floods, fires and long-term care.

Captain Robin Allen MSC, OMM, CD RCN (retired)

 

daftandbarmy

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We have seen the enemy, and they are us:

Is Canada’s military ready for the challenges ahead? ‘No,’ says defence chief​


Canada’s military is not ready for the challenges the future holds as the global security situation continues “deteriorating,” warned Chief of the Defence Staff Gen. Wayne Eyre.
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In an interview with The West Block‘s Mercedes Stephenson airing Sunday, Eyre spoke about the efforts the military is making to support Ukraine in its defence against the Russian invasion, but also about the difficulties the Canadian Forces are facing in preparing for the demands of a more unstable world.

“Do you think that you are ready right now?” Stephenson asked.

“Right now, for the challenges that lie ahead? No,” Eyre said.

“That’s why it’s so important that we reconstitute our force, get our numbers back up, that we get the capabilities in place that are relevant for the future security environment, while at the same time, as we focus on that future piece, being able to respond today.”

While military officials aren’t placing blame on any single issue with respect to the recruitment and retention problems, the Canadian Forces have been shaken in recent years by a sexual misconduct crisis that touched even the highest ranks, along with wider attention on systemic racism.

The reputational problem has been compounded by concerns about the presence of right-wing extremists and racism in the ranks, which a review said last year were factors “repulsing” new recruits.


 

FJAG

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Boy. Talk about taking minor factors which have been the sole focus of recent press attention and completely ignoring (once again) the real fundamental issues which have plagued the military for decades rather than just a reporter's limited attention span.

😖
 

Halifax Tar

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Im currently going through something akin to "contract negations" with the CAF at the present moment.

I have one part of the CAF trying to keep me, and the other trying to get me. And for the past number of weeks its been offers and counter offers, so to speak.

I'm not sure if its my rank, but I suspect its the climate we are in. But It is very unusual for me to say no to something; and now be told ok don't make any decisions let me see what else is available. 3 years ago I would have been told where the express exit is. I am woefully underprepared for this, anyone have a good agent ? This is all very bizarre.
 
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