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Remains found at Kamloops residential school 'not an isolated incident,' Indigenous experts and leaders warn

Loachman

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Remius

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Both good articles. The first shows hypocrisy on both sides. The other is a good example that one side does not have the monopoly of ignoring First Nations when they say something.
 

Loachman

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Nothing is ever simple.

There is always much more to a story than is first apparent.
 

daftandbarmy

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Meanwhile, in Manitoba, the Pallister government is reminded that a closed mouth gathers no feet:

First Nations leaders decry 'racist political propaganda' by Manitoba government, call for resignation​



First Nations representatives harshly called out the Manitoba government on Monday, labelling recent comments by Premier Brian Pallister and cabinet minister Alan Lagimodiere as propaganda and demanding the latter's resignation.

Standing on the front steps of the legislative building, the Summit of Treaty 5 Sovereign Nations (STFSN) blasted the Progressive Conservative government for a "deliberate attempt to distort the history of Indigenous peoples regarding the policy of genocide at residential schools."

In a fiery speech that could be heard far from the Tyndall stone steps, Grand Chief Arlen Dumas of the Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs shouted his anger with Pallister and Lagimodiere.

"We found 1,505 children murdered in these schools, hidden and buried in the ground, and in the same breath, [you] say 'but residential schools were a good thing. Assimilation was a good thing.' Who can say that in their right mind?" he said.

"Here we are today trying again to have people who are so ill-informed and uninformed and uneducated [and] ignorant, tell my mother that what happened to her in residential school, it was OK."


Dumas spoke of how Indigenous people showed the first European settlers how to travel and survive in a land and climate that could be inhospitable at times.

"Where we treated your ancestors like human beings, your institutions treated us like savages," he yelled.

The comments by Pallister and Lagimodiere suggest nothing is changing, Dumas said.

"I'm tired of talking to Pallister. I give him every opportunity to have meaningful dialogue. We bring forward meaningful solutions to work together, hand in hand, to move forward. But he'd rather talk at me."

During a Canada Day rally in Winnipeg, following the discovery of unmarked graves at former residential schools in Canada, statues of Queen Victoria and Queen Elizabeth were pulled down on the grounds of the Manitoba Legislature.

Pallister denounced the actions and made comments that suggested the colonization of Canada was done with good intentions.

The people who came to Canada "didn't come here to destroy anything. They came here to build. They came to build better," he said, adding the statues would be repaired and set back up, though the locations might change.

In a news release, the STFSN said the premier's comments are "racist political propaganda distorting and romanticizing colonialism."

"If Pallister wants to rebuild that statue so quickly, a statue that some of my non-First Nations friends in Manitoba didn't even know the significance of, then he may as well be building them on those graves," Dumas said.

Pallister's remarks provoked the resignation of his own Indigenous and northern relations minister, Eileen Clarke, who stepped down from her cabinet position two days later.

In doing so, Clarke said many Manitobans are disappointed with their representatives, and added that she and other cabinet ministers had not been listened to.

She was replaced by Lagimodiere, who, within 10 minutes of his appointment on July 15, told reporters the people who ran Indian residential schools believed "they were doing the right thing."

"In retrospect, it's easy to judge in the past. But at the time, they really thought that they were doing the right thing," he said.

"From my knowledge of it, the residential school system was designed to take Indigenous children and give them the skills and abilities they would need to fit into society as it moved forward."


 

Remius

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Where is that face palm emoji.

Jesus H Christ is this one stupid priest.
It’s probably similar to when we have CAF members go on record and say something stupid publicly. People think they speak for the organisation when In reality they aren’t authorized to.
 

mariomike

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People think they speak for the organisation when In reality they aren’t authorized to.
Employees do not speak for their employers. You can answer questions of a general nature, but not make a public statement.

If an employee feels the need to make a public statement, they can ask their union, if they have one, to make one on their behalf.

That's the way I understood it.
 

Kilted

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I suppose that that is comparable to a CAF member coming out and saying that some of the people who made Op Honour complaints, lied to take part in the settlement.
 
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Remius

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I suppose that that is comparable to a CAF member coming out and saying that some of the people who made Op Honour complaints, lied to take part in the settlement.
I’d go one further and suggest it would be similar to the CO of a unit to come out and say that.
 

Jarnhamar

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I suppose that that is comparable to a CAF member coming out and saying that some of the people who made Op Honour complaints, lied to take part in the settlement.
Some CAF members absolutely lied to take part in the settlement. The same way some members absolutely fake injuries to get a 3(b) release.
 

Kilted

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Some CAF members absolutely lied to take part in the settlement. The same way some members absolutely fake injuries to get a 3(b) release.
I know, but I wouldn't say that to the media or where the media is likely to get ahold of it (I know that this site is somewhere where the media could get ahold of it, however for all they know I may not be a serving member).
 

Jarnhamar

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It's just human nature. The same way some people rip off workers comp. I didn't take the comments from the priest as pointing out the nature of "some people". I get the feeling he's negatively stereotyping with a broad brush and trying to subtly discredit victims. I feel like a number of priests are taking that approach. Which is messed up.
 

Colin Parkinson

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I suspect that a lot of priests who had nothing to do with the residential school system feel they are being smeared with a toxic brush and are hitting back. The issue is always complicated by having humans on both sides of the issue which means you get all types.
 

OceanBonfire

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They have no shame:

The Roman Catholic Church spent millions of dollars that were supposed to go to residential school survivors on lawyers, administration, a private fundraising company and unapproved loans, according to documents obtained by CBC News.

The documents include a host of other revelations. They appear to contradict the Catholic Church's public claims about money paid to survivors.

 

Colin Parkinson

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You can imagine how much INAC spends on Lawyers and other stuff every year compared to how much goes to the bands
 
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