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Replacing the Subs

Eye In The Sky

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Immediately replace the aurora with a capable replacement with larger numbers to allow more overflights of the Arctic. Ensure that these aircraft or if retaining the Auroras are armed with the Harpoon or NSM.

Add 'air to air refueling' to the must have list...as much as I dislike the idea of an 18+hour patrol, 24hr endurance made the Argus very effective at NORPATs.

But, back to reality - we can always watch and read about our Allies who are doing the business properly! 😁😁



 
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CBH99

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I would include China...the UK has "bombers", too, as well as France. I think China, personally, is the country to focus on in that group.
Seen.

I’ll do some research later today, as my knowledge of Chinese-built submarine capabilities is actually sorely lacking.

I was under the impression that while they had SSGNs, and that number is growing (like everything else modern in their arsenal) - the vast majority of their current submarine fleet were older diesel boats.

Also agreed on which subs to watch for. While the US, UK, France, and Russia all build ‘bombers’ - the ones in use by China are the only ones that really cause me to focus.
 

Weinie

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Add 'air to air refueling' to the must have list...as much as I dislike the idea of an 18+hour patrol, 24hr endurance made the Argus very effective at NORPATs.

But, back to reality - we can always watch and read about our Allies who are doing the business properly! 😁😁



Yup. This
 

Eye In The Sky

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For a submarine thread, this is pretty wide-ranging.

...so the thread is still in the search phase?

Meme Reaction GIF by Travis
 

Czech_pivo

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Interesting read. Quite possibly tied to the large US/UK/JPN Carrier TaskForce operating south-east of Okinawa recently,

 

Eye In The Sky

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There's lots of scenarios that make people cringe; after being on board one of our subs, 2 of mine would be a collision or fire while in a deep dive config.
 

Czech_pivo

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There's lots of scenarios that make people cringe; after being on board one of our subs, 2 of mine would be a collision or fire while in a deep dive config.

I’m not sure I’d be able to handle more than a few days at best in one of them.
I think of what the poor fellows in the Kursk went through….
 

CBH99

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…all in water less deep than half the length of the sub. 😳
Wait, what??

I need to do some googling… the water was THAT shallow? 😕




I had obviously heard about the Kursk, but didn’t research a lot of the details until it’s now.

I had followed the news about a submarine in trouble, the Russians refusing outside help (I would think if the same situation happened today, the acceptance of help would be much much speedier) - and all of the crew had been lost.

Talk about a cursed cruise. Every single thing about that tragedy seems like Murphy’s Law in full effect. 😔
 

CBH99

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Interesting read. Quite possibly tied to the large US/UK/JPN Carrier TaskForce operating south-east of Okinawa recently,

I realize my question is going to most likely be rhetorical due to a variety of OPSEC reasons…

But how does a Seawolf class submarine collide with an ‘object’ (Alien USO and US Navy traffic accident?) - and have the USN submarine NOT see the object first?

And what could the object even be? Speculation, I realize. But what can a submarine collide with if submerged in open ocean, other than another submarine or surfacing under a ship by accident? (Which has happened more than once)
 

SeaKingTacco

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I realize my question is going to most likely be rhetorical due to a variety of OPSEC reasons…

But how does a Seawolf class submarine collide with an ‘object’ (Alien USO and US Navy traffic accident?) - and have the USN submarine NOT see the object first?

And what could the object even be? Speculation, I realize. But what can a submarine collide with if submerged in open ocean, other than another submarine or surfacing under a ship by accident? (Which has happened more than once)
The wording of the news release begs a few questions. It could be an uncharted seamount or wreck- it happens, as our knowledge of the seabottom is never 100%.

It could also have been another submarine or a ship. The reason that can happen when relying on passive sonar is that while it is relatively easy to determine a bearing to another contact, range to contact is always a dark art.
 

Eye In The Sky

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There's always the chance of hitting something not man-made that is neither on the ocean floor, or surface. I recall reading about huge trees/logs, becoming water-logged and riding the current below the surface, as an example.

Crew with minor cuts/injuries suggests something of significant size/mass to me (just a WAG). 8600+ tons...
 

Czech_pivo

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The wording of the news release begs a few questions. It could be an uncharted seamount or wreck- it happens, as our knowledge of the seabottom is never 100%.

It could also have been another submarine or a ship. The reason that can happen when relying on passive sonar is that while it is relatively easy to determine a bearing to another contact, range to contact is always a dark art.
There is this interesting article (from the title0 but I can't (won't) get behind the pay wall. Wondering if this could be a case of blue on blue - total speculation.

Royal Navy submarine jousts with Japanese in show of strength aimed at China​

‘Cat and mouse’ training exercise between navies of Britain and Japan signals strategic cooperation in face of Beijing’s sabre-rattling


 
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