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Sexual Misconduct Allegations in The CAF

hattrick72

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It's known as the 'Broken Window Theory' or, in RCR paralnce, 'Never Pass a Fault':

Broken windows theory, academic theory proposed by James Q. Wilson and George Kelling in 1982 that used broken windows as a metaphor for disorder within neighbourhoods. Their theory links disorder and incivility within a community to subsequent occurrences of serious crime.

Broken windows theory had an enormous impact on police policy throughout the 1990s and remained influential into the 21st century. Perhaps the most notable application of the theory was in New York City under the direction of Police Commissioner William Bratton. He and others were convinced that the aggressive order-maintenance practices of the New York City Police Department were responsible for the dramatic decrease in crime rates within the city during the 1990s. Bratton began translating the theory into practice as the chief of New York City’s transit police from 1990 to 1992. Squads of plainclothes officers were assigned to catch turnstile jumpers, and, as arrests for misdemeanours increased, subway crimes of all kinds decreased dramatically. In 1994, when he became New York City police commissioner, Bratton introduced his broken windows-based “quality of life initiative.” This initiative cracked down on panhandling, disorderly behaviour, public drinking, street prostitution, and unsolicited windshield washing or other such attempts to obtain cash from drivers stopped in traffic. When Bratton resigned in 1996, felonies were down almost 40 percent in New York, and the homicide rate had been halved.

Prior to the development and implementation of various incivility theories such as broken windows, law enforcement scholars and police tended to focus on serious crime; that is, the major concern was with crimes that were perceived to be the most serious and consequential for the victim, such as rape, robbery, and murder. Wilson and Kelling took a different view. They saw serious crime as the final result of a lengthier chain of events, theorizing that crime emanated from disorder and that if disorder were eliminated, then serious crimes would not occur.

I agree with this approach. In our context you don't need to hammer someone for the small things, but they shouldn't get away Scott free either. The higher the rank, or more time in the less lenient. If you take care of the small stuff, the majority of the big stuff will disappear.

My opinion/feeling as I said pages ago is we have a history of letting our shooting stars/chosen ones get away with things by virtue of who they were or the potential they offered.

For my example the A/CWO (I realise this was autocorrected in my original post) was promoted to CWO and nominated for and given the OMM after the complaint went in, so it seemed like nothing was done in their case. Admin Measures are confidential so not anyone's business if that was the road taken.

One thing that has changed since the 1990s with broken window theory is it would be seen as targeting marginalised members of our community. I don't see how that can translate to the military culture or our discipline system though
 

mariomike

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Broken windows theory, academic theory proposed by James Q. Wilson and George Kelling in 1982 that used broken windows as a metaphor for disorder within neighbourhoods. Their theory links disorder and incivility within a community to subsequent occurrences of serious crime.
My uncle was a Metro police officer. He didn't mention "Broken Window Theory", but said something like if you reported a missing cat, for example, they would assign a squad to the case.

He was exaggerating of course. But, I think the point he was trying to make to me was that when a taxpayer calls for help, the situation - to them, at least - is serious. Therefore it is taken seriously by those the call is assigned to.

At least it should be. In theory, at least.

I guess the same theory in emergency services might also be applied to the military, to a certain extent.
 

Haggis

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I worked with then-Maj Sean Friday in ADM (HR-Mil) about 20 years ago and thought of him as a really smart and stand-up guy. This is disappointing.
 

Jarnhamar

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Popov said in 2015, a male officer cadet stole underwear from a female officer cadet’s room. That individual, Popov said, was arrested by military police but was allowed to remain in the officer cadet program, while he says [BGen] Friday suggested the female cadet use a different stairwell to avoid running into the male officer cadet.

Popov described another incident that occurred in July 2015, when RMC was hosting a group of female sea cadets, youth between the ages of 12 and 18.
Popov says male officer cadets yelled sexually violent obscenities at several female sea cadets. He said Friday punished him for trying to reprimand officer cadets in the barracks where the incident occurred, and telling them there would be an investigation.

I said basically that, if you stand by and let this happen you are as guilty as the perpetrators … sometime after that, Gen. Friday heard that I did that and viewed that as improper, improper conduct. I was admonished and some career administration was taken against me, which effectively ended my career.”

Global News obtained a copy of the reprimand issued to Popov after the incident, and signed by Friday.

In it, Popov is described as having been “unable to adapt his leadership style to the needs of the Royal Military College of Canada and has not followed through on adhering to direction regarding culture/climate and interpersonal conflict.”


Maybe RMC needs to adapt their leadership to the needs of modern society. Or maybe it just needs to close its doors.
 

CBH99

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Maybe RMC needs to adapt their leadership to the needs of modern society. Or maybe it just needs to close its doors.
When all of this first came out, I naively just thought that the CDS got caught having a relationship at work behind his wife’s back. (I still have serious questions & doubts about the complainant, but that isn’t the point.)

Then they came out with the news the Admiral was also being investigated, so he was out before he was even in.

I honestly thought that was it. Boom. Done. CDS had an affair, and the Admiral had a complaint. I didn’t assume either was anything particularly bad, as my ‘assumption’ was that GOFO’s were extremely professional and LED BY EXAMPLE. Basic leadership 101.


But now? Reading the article above, and with EVERYTHING else that’s come out. I don’t even know what to say 😔🤷🏼‍♂️

Not harassing your colleagues of the opposite gender isn’t hard. Not sexually assaulting people should be an unspoken given. If someone does something unprofessional and crude of a sexual nature, they should be held accountable accordingly. None of the things released over the last month or two should be happening anywhere... it’s literally ‘don’t be a dirt bag’ common.

Just don’t even know what to say other than read and shake my head at this point...
 

MilEME09

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Given the precieved culture of ignoring or sweeping this under the rug at RMC. I am curious how many of our current senior leadership under investigation went to RMC?
 

daftandbarmy

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Given the precieved culture of ignoring or sweeping this under the rug at RMC. I am curious how many of our current senior leadership under investigation went to RMC?

Although it's easy to pick on RMC (and fun too! :) ) I'd say that we need to look at the wider organization as just narrowing it down to RMC won't get at the size, depth or complexity of the issues at play in terms of a whole culture.

As Jarnhamar notes, there are some good ones out there. Let's figure out how to make/select/promote more of them like that.
 

IRONMAN3

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I worked with then-Maj Sean Friday in ADM (HR-Mil) about 20 years ago and thought of him as a really smart and stand-up guy. This is disappointing.
He was my SC and I thought the same until he remarked after an officer was found not guilty for misconduct. He went on to say that his faith in the court martial system was back! He was referring to another officer being found guilty of sexual assault, there were a few jumping to this officers defense in the sqn but that statement gives light to the challenges in power structures and wanting to come forward.

And for context, the member called me regarding the assault and I went straight to their Chief to report it and indicated that I was ready to drive the member to the RCMP station if things did not happen (Sgt at the time). I believe and support the LCol on his words.
 

CBH99

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Global News is reporting that the former Director, Cadets at RMC was ordered not to put things in writing, lest there be an ATIP request, and not to take action.



I was told on multiple occasions by Gen. Friday: don’t write things down, don’t email me things, don’t make reports, because there might be an access to information request and we might have questions about military justice. Don’t put things in writing.

As someone who has been appointed Director, Cadets at RMC - I would assume they have enough experience, knowledge, and time in the military to know when an order makes sense, and when it doesn't. In this case, it clearly didn't make sense at all.

Follow the order? You are knee deep in a ton of potential legal issues - negligence, possibly an obstruction charge depending on circumstances, charges under the NDA, etc.

Don't follow the order and do things properly? Get the wrath of your senior for not obeying his orders.


Genuine question for those who are more knowledgably than I.... if someone is reprimanded for something that they have a strong moral argument that they are in the right (both morally and professionally), can that reprimand not be appealed? And wouldn't someone take notice of the petty, unprofessional nature of the reprimand & have it disappear? (Take this case for example)



EDIT: The more I think about this, the more I feel like I'm missing something here...

- Ordering someone not to write things down, document anything, e-mail them, do reports, or essentially do 'anything' about an incident -- you are effectively ordering that person to turn a blind eye, be negligent in their duties both morally and administratively, and not perform their duties. You are ordering someone to conduct themselves in a manner contrary to the NDA, common sense, in some cases the CC, etc etc.

Not only is that piss poor leadership (ordering someone to lower their morals, knowing that if they obey your orders they may be subject to legal/discipline issues as a result) - but wouldn't that be a clear example of an illegal order?

If reprimanded as a result of not following these directions/orders, would it not be pretty easy to go elsewhere with it & have it taken care of immediately? And wouldn't the person who wrote the reprimand now have some questions to answer?

Reprimanded because you chose to document, report, and e-mail instances of sexual misconduct even though ordered not to? Even though as the Director, Cadets - the safety and well being of the cadets is your # 1 priority? With OP HONOUR in affect, wouldn't there by a solid expectation that any instances WOULD be documented & reported?



Maybe I'm missing something? Maybe I'm not? I feel like there's something in the middle there that I MUST be missing...
 
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CBH99

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Given the precieved culture of ignoring or sweeping this under the rug at RMC. I am curious how many of our current senior leadership under investigation went to RMC?
The sad thing is, this isn't just an RMC issue.

People who have some power or authority choose to use that power to sweep things under the rug when it's their friends or colleagues behave in a way that most of us would find inexcusable, or they don't want to deal with it. It sucks, but I've seen it in emergency services, crown prosecutors offices, etc etc.
 

Good2Golf

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Genuine question for those who are more knowledgably than I.... if someone is reprimanded for something that they have a strong moral argument that they are in the right (both morally and professionally), can that reprimand not be appealed? And wouldn't someone take notice of the petty, unprofessional nature of the reprimand & have it disappear? (Take this case for example)

Yes, a redress of grievance can be pursued by CAF members. The ultimate authority for redresses is the CDS. I don’t know if LCol(Ret) Popov redressed any direct action by (then) BGen Friday, but it seems that the two officers did not agree on the severity of the event(s), or how to address the issue appropriately. My own gut feel on this one is that Popov addressing the issue immediately through the MPs was appropriate. It seems things devolved from there.

Regards
G2G
 

Ostrozac

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As soon as someone says he doesn't want to know, or that there should be no record, he's wrong.
This. This times a thousand. I’m proud of what I’ve done, and I want there to be a paper trail. For lessons learned, and eventually for the historians. If what I am doing on a specific day is particularly sensitive, then that paper trail should be properly classified, but there still needs to be a paper trail.

l‘m a professional soldier, not some kind of gangster or outlaw biker.
 

daftandbarmy

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As soon as someone says he doesn't want to know, or that there should be no record, he's wrong.

I hate false analogies, especially where Nazi Germany is involved, but when I read about this the Wansee Conference came to mind. There continues to be those who deny that the holocaust was ordered at the highest levels mainly because the Nazis involved were careful to cleanse the records of this meeting:


"Near the end of the discussion, the Wannsee Protocol refers to "different types of possible solutions" (verschiedene Arten der Lösungsmöglichkeiten) for the “Jewish Question.” Apparently, Heydrich instructed Eichmann that no specifics of the methods of killing be given. To anyone with eyes to see, though, it was obvious what was meant. The transition from mass shooting to gassing was already underway."

 

Halifax Tar

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If I can see the fault in being ordered to use a DND Acquisition Card in illegally and say not to a LT(N). Why didn't the LCol see the fault in being ordered not leave a paper trail to something he also new was wrong ? Why didn't he go to NIS, the MPs, the RCMP or even the press ?

I appreciate Popov for coming forward but he holds some responsibility in this as well and he should be held accountable for not having the moral courage to stand up and do something. If a LCol, or any rank for that matter, doesnt have the courage to put their career on the line, can they be trusted to put their life on the line ?

This quote speaks volumes to me:

“I regret having gone there because it was the end of my career. And I feel shame because a lot of things happened there that demonstrate the failures of leadership right now that are endemic in the Canadian Forces,”

We have to get over our careers and trying to reach the stars and instead get back to having the fortitude to do the right thing.
 

hattrick72

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If I can see the fault in being ordered to use a DND Acquisition Card in illegally and say not to a LT(N). Why didn't the LCol see the fault in being ordered not leave a paper trail to something he also new was wrong ? Why didn't he go to NIS, the MPs, the RCMP or even the press ?

I appreciate Popov for coming forward but he holds some responsibility in this as well and he should be held accountable for not having the moral courage to stand up and do something. If a LCol, or any rank for that matter, doesnt have the courage to put their career on the line, can they be trusted to put their life on the line ?

This quote speaks volumes to me:

“I regret having gone there because it was the end of my career. And I feel shame because a lot of things happened there that demonstrate the failures of leadership right now that are endemic in the Canadian Forces,”

We have to get over our careers and trying to reach the stars and instead get back to having the fortitude to do the right thing.
Why was a LCdr in the Navy threatened to lose their career for filling a report?

When the top of the unit food chain is afraid to do the right thing, I think it is time to question why and root out the cause.
 

Bruce Monkhouse

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If I can see the fault in being ordered to use a DND Acquisition Card in illegally and say not to a LT(N). Why didn't the LCol see the fault in being ordered not leave a paper trail to something he also new was wrong ? Why didn't he go to NIS, the MPs, the RCMP or even the press ?

I appreciate Popov for coming forward but he holds some responsibility in this as well and he should be held accountable for not having the moral courage to stand up and do something. If a LCol, or any rank for that matter, doesnt have the courage to put their career on the line, can they be trusted to put their life on the line ?

This quote speaks volumes to me:

“I regret having gone there because it was the end of my career. And I feel shame because a lot of things happened there that demonstrate the failures of leadership right now that are endemic in the Canadian Forces,”

We have to get over our careers and trying to reach the stars and instead get back to having the fortitude to do the right thing.
Sounds like he tried to change the culture a little and got hung out to dry for it........what more would you like, kill his boss maybe??

And if you seriously think reporting something to the authorities makes bad behavior stop, go back and reread this thread.
 

Halifax Tar

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Sounds like he tried to change the culture a little and got hung out to dry for it........what more would you like, kill his boss maybe??

And if you seriously think reporting something to the authorities makes bad behavior stop, go back and reread this thread.

To a Sickly season and a bloody war ? ;)

I'm not looking for instant gratification, I'm looking for leadership to do the right thing.
 
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