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Sexual Misconduct Allegations in The CAF

Halifax Tar

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Something similar to how the US has tests, such as trade knowledge, Harassment policy, Codes of Conduct, professionalism, aptitude, ethics, skill, PT, military threshold knowledge, principles of leadership etc prior to advancement. Say a promotion review board. No more checks in the box. No more Acting Lacking. Proper mentoring. Minimal standards are not acceptable. Not everyone is promotion material. Master tradesmen, specialist. Not exactly leadership material. You can make a mistake but you best learn from it. the Americans often remove Leaders from positions due to various infractions they also post that info in their News Feeds.
Yup. I have always liked the US system. But I prefer boards over written exams. Exams show academic aptitude, of the ability to memorize information; but that does not in its self equal leadership potential. IMHO you get a better feeling for someone with them sitting in front of you and answering challenging questions on various topics.

Also lets get rid of PLQ once and for all. ;)
 

dimsum

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You can make a mistake but you best learn from it. the Americans often remove Leaders from positions due to various infractions they also post that info in their News Feeds.
I'm not sure if you're suggesting that the Americans allow mistakes, but from talking to various US exchange folks it's definitely the opposite.

Anything that isn't an "immediate PER" is awful because you only have three chances to get promoted, or else you're kicked out. If you leave as less than a Major (not sure about the NCM side) then you don't have a pension.

So, the US system is tailor-made for careerists, not specialist "Cpl/Capt for Life" who has the long-term knowledge.
 

T700

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Yup. I have always liked the US system. But I prefer boards over written exams. Exams show academic aptitude, of the ability to memorize information; but that does not in its self equal leadership potential. IMHO you get a better feeling for someone with them sitting in front of you and answering challenging questions on various topics.

Also lets get rid of PLQ once and for all. ;)
I think both have a place, there is info as a junior Leader you should know beyond your immediate task, corporate knowledge, networking. The days of people only have completed grade 8 and being accepted are long gone. PLQ should not have a 100% success rate or considered an easy go check in the box. It has to be a challenge. Leadership is not a popularity contest. We are failing our people buy doing so. Same for Officers equivalent. Just because you passed doesn’t mean immediate promotion.
 

T700

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I'm not sure if you're suggesting that the Americans allow mistakes, but from talking to various US exchange folks it's definitely the opposite.

Anything that isn't an "immediate PER" is awful because you only have three chances to get promoted, or else you're kicked out. If you leave as less than a Major (not sure about the NCM side) then you don't have a pension.

So, the US system is tailor-made for careerists, not specialist "Cpl/Capt for Life" who has the long-term knowledge.
I’m saying they deal with infractions and it’s made public. Not saying we have to completely adopt their system but to take from it parts that work better than ours. Actually look at other Allied nations and how they deal with things as well.
 

CBH99

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While I can't access the article, as I don't have an account (I'll maybe create one later since it's free) - I will cautiously criticize/oppose the author's perspective, based sheerly on the 2 lines I can view in the link above.

As stated above, the change needs to come from all levels. Top down, and bottom up - the big mushy part in the middle (a good chunk of us) all have a part to play. But, I do agree that as these members age & progress their way up the ranks, it will be up to them to really solidify the changes needed in the long run.


The 'top-down' part is very much needed as members need to feel safe to come forwards if something happens. The leadership need to be seen presenting the image of professional, moral, capable leadership that - in this case - can and will handle these situations swiftly when they do arise.

The senior leadership need to lead by example, enforce the policies in place, and ask themselves "If this was my daughter, and this happened to her, and her boss handled it the way I handled this...would I be happy?" and if the answer is no, fix it. Simple.

Course and unit staff need to lead by example as well, and make it very clear that sexual misconduct isn't tolerated. Period. Doesn't matter who is buddies with who, or whether or not you feel like doing a bloody report - policies get followed. Period.


I'd also suggest that OP HONOUR wasn't a failure.

OP HONOUR introduced a very strong, consistent message throughout the ranks that sexual nonsense of any kind isn't tolerated. If it happens, report it to your senior, and it will be handled swiftly. The message was strong and consistent, and I can think of a small handful of examples where someone filed a complaint & it was dealt with immediately. Over the years, whether the example was set by members themselves, or they had it drilled into them via endless powerpoints - OP HONOUR did introduce a cultural shift in the military, for the better. The intent was noble, but the execution was inconsistent, and sometimes non-existent.

Was it perfect? Clearly not. In some cases it left a lot to be desired. But that isn't the fault of OP HONOUR, that is the fault of the individuals who were approached with a complaint, and did nothing to correct the situation. Leaders need to lead, and a huge part of that is making sure your members are safe from that kind of nonsense.

Someone higher threatens to reprimand you for following procedure? Screw em'. They just set themselves up for a lot more hurt than the junior who is following policy.



I would suggest that a lot more people came forwards than otherwise would have, and 'for the most part' those situations were handled. We have to remember - the media isn't reporting on the incidents where things were handled properly, they are reporting the ones that weren't.
 

daftandbarmy

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I would suggest that a lot more people came forwards than otherwise would have, and 'for the most part' those situations were handled. We have to remember - the media isn't reporting on the incidents where things were handled properly, they are reporting the ones that weren't.

Too bad about that 'fear of reporting bad news' thing, which is omnipresent and institutionalized:

“Fear invites wrong figures. Bearers of bad news fare badly. To keep his job, anyone may present to his boss only good news.”

W. Edwards Deming
 

MilEME09

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Too bad about that 'fear of reporting bad news' thing, which is omnipresent and institutionalized:

“Fear invites wrong figures. Bearers of bad news fare badly. To keep his job, anyone may present to his boss only good news.”

W. Edwards Deming
Don't report anything that might make the institution look bad, which leads to the institution looking bad for not reporting the problems.

Gotta love the logic
 

CBH99

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Don't report anything that might make the institution look bad, which leads to the institution looking bad for not reporting the problems.

Gotta love the logic
My mind has been swirling around that very issue, but I couldn't think of a way to articulate it as succinctly as that. Bingo.

If logic was part of this process, however, I think they'd have thought about this the same way we all seem to...
 

TCM621

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Don't report anything that might make the institution look bad, which leads to the institution looking bad for not reporting the problems.

Gotta love the logic
This isn't limited to sexual misconduct either. Remember during the Adm Norman situation a person was told not to address him as anything that might be searchable. That person did the right thing and spoke up.
 

trigger324

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I'd also suggest that OP HONOUR wasn't a failure.
Agreed. Our CO came to my section to speak to us the day after the Vance bombshell. They were disgusted in him for his hypocrisy but told us not to forget the message despite the messenger(Vance himself). The message is as noble as they come, but these guys were incapable in delivering it.
 

QV

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While attempting to change the internal culture, bear in mind the external culture. Most of what I hear and read indicates that young people are more highly sexualized and exposed to commercial expressions of sexuality than prior generations. We are way past Playboy centrefolds.
This is the elephant in the room. How does the CAF, which is trying to tamp down sexual misconduct, react to a society that has become more highly sexualized? Today, sex is more freely given and received outside of formal relationships than probably ever before. Will this lead to far more instances of “inappropriate relationships”? How can it not?
 

Remius

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This is the elephant in the room. How does the CAF, which is trying to tamp down sexual misconduct, react to a society that has become more highly sexualized? Today, sex is more freely given and received outside of formal relationships than probably ever before. Will this lead to far more instances of “inappropriate relationships”? How can it not?
None of which explains then why this issue seems to be pervasive with people from a previous generations as well. The current crop of offenders aren’t exactly millennials.
 

QV

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None of which explains then why this issue seems to be pervasive with people from a previous generations as well. The current crop of offenders aren’t exactly millennials.
The society has become more sexualized, not just a handful of the demographic. I think you’re partially correct in that some of the older generation, but not all, are more resistant to this change. However, its more about what is acceptable today as far as sexual relations go.
 

Remius

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The society has become more sexualized, not just a handful of the demographic. I think you’re partially correct in that some of the older generation, but not all, are more resistant to this change. However, its more about what is acceptable today as far as sexual relations go.
Right but a lot of incidents happened decades ago as well. We do live in a hyper sexualised society and yes, navigating that isn’t easy. And while society has gotten more sexualized I believe it is getting more intolerant of the inappropriate conduct that comes with it, which is why people are speaking out. This is a good thing.

And yet, other sectors of the work force have been able to put into place policies and practices that have greatly reduced those types of inappropriate behaviours despite a society that is getting more sexualized.
 

QV

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Right but a lot of incidents happened decades ago as well. We do live in a hyper sexualised society and yes, navigating that isn’t easy. And while society has gotten more sexualized I believe it is getting more intolerant of the inappropriate conduct that comes with it, which is why people are speaking out. This is a good thing.

And yet, other sectors of the work force have been able to put into place policies and practices that have greatly reduced those types of inappropriate behaviours despite a society that is getting more sexualized.
And back to my question, how does the CAF handle this today and forward with the changed perceptions and acceptance of sexual behaviour outside of formal relationships? I think our society’s move in this direction could result in more instances of “inappropriate relationships” occurring within the CAF, not less.
 

Remius

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I would argue that society does not accept the current situation the CAF finds itself in. The current inappropriate relationships and conduct are a result of a leadership deficit and predatory style power dynamic that is supported by our system (I don’t mean actively supported per se, but the way our CoC and culture exists). It isn’t about sexual relationships, it is about inappropriate ones and inappropriate ones. So casual sex let’s say between two consenting adults should not be an issue but the boss and the employee is not nor has it ever been acceptable. Just because society tolerates some sexualisation, I don’t think it tolerate sexualisation when it involves a power dynamic.
 

Brad Sallows

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"Society" doesn't like seeing powerful men who have done these things. Very few allegations are coming forward in any occupation about what some guy with no public profile did 30 years ago. Among today's young adults are tomorrow's powerful adults, but they are not yet powerful. What present conduct will surface in 10, 20, 30 years because it passes contemporary standards, whatever those may be? Abuse of authority is not the only root cause of today's problems.
 
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