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Sexual Misconduct Allegations in The CAF

FJAG

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Considering the death toll in the 20th century by declared Atheists (aka Communists) the non-religious types don't have much of a track record either. You can't deny the role religion has had on forming morality and how to this day it still has an effect. The only difference is that we now have other means of creating and enforcing that morality.

Just a reminder that the folks that killed 6 million Jews and 20 million Russians wore belt buckles with "God With Us" on them. I won't even get into witch burnings and the inquisition and the crusades and the Wars of the Reformation and ... and ...

🤔
 

ballz

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FWIW I'd love a new thread to discuss religion for 8 posts before it gets locked up..... but let's not ruin this one....
 

daftandbarmy

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FWIW I'd love a new thread to discuss religion for 8 posts before it gets locked up..... but let's not ruin this one....

sassy d&d GIF by Hyper RPG
 

dapaterson

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The RCN's problems are primarily RCN leadership problems unconnected to Hellyer.

Solve the toxic leadership first.
 

daftandbarmy

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The RCN's problems are primarily RCN leadership problems unconnected to Hellyer.

Solve the toxic leadership first.

Here's a good reminder....

“It is comparatively simple to select the generals after a display of their military qualities on the battlefield. The difficulty is when we must choose them prior to employment in active operations. . . . The most important factor of all is character, which involves integrity, unselfish and devoted purpose, a sturdiness of bearing when everything goes wrong and all are critical, and a willingness to sacrifice self in the interest of the common good.”–George C. Marshall, 1944, writing to Miss Craig’s class in Roanoke, Virginia
 

MilEME09

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The RCN's problems are primarily RCN leadership problems unconnected to Hellyer.

Solve the toxic leadership first.
We need to end the culture of promote and post to deal with problem soldiers. Instead people need to stop being lazy, and start charging and reprimanding bad apples and those who don't do their jobs.
 

OldSolduer

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We need to end the culture of promote and post to deal with problem soldiers. Instead people need to stop being lazy, and start charging and reprimanding bad apples and those who don't do their jobs.
When I was in I often saw sub par officers and NCOs posted to “where they couldn’t do any harm”.
 

FJAG

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When I was in I often saw sub par officers and NCOs posted to “where they couldn’t do any harm”.

The thing about average is that there are just as many people below average as there are above average. Considering how long it takes to build a replacement from scratch, its not unusual to find that the system needs to find a place for them.

I'm a firm believer in the Peter Principle. Since the military is a hierarchy that thrives, on and rewards with, promotion it is no surprise that many folks end up being promoted to a level where their competence barely keeps up or doesn't measure up anymore. That's normal. There are places in the system where they can still usefully contribute.

What's abnormal is promoting folks beyond that level just because there is a position to fill and they're the next one on the promotion list because their current supervisor doesn't have the courage to mark them down to how they truly are.

🍻
 

OldSolduer

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That bites you in the ass because they tend to do well where they can’t do any harm, then they come back and try to supervise... disaster ensues.
I’ve often heard a certain retttttired officer was never to command troops again after his stint as a CO. I’m sure you kkkkknow of whom I speak...
 

daftandbarmy

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Survey says....


Majority of Canadians not confident military can improve workplace culture: Nanos survey​


A new survey suggests Canadians aren't very confident in the Canadian military's ability to change its workplace culture following reports of sexual misconduct and discrimination within the forces.

According to the latest survey from Nanos Research, just 13 per cent of Canadians are confident the Canadian Armed Forces can “change its workplace to be welcoming to everyone,” while 29 per cent are “somewhat confident” and 56 per cent are either not confident or somewhat not confident.

Additionally, 61.3 per cent of women involved in the survey were either not confident or somewhat not confident in the military’s ability to change its culture.

Canadians are also not very impressed with the Canadian government’s investigation into allegations of sexual misconduct and discrimination in the military, with 54 per cent of respondents indicating their perception of the investigations is either poor or very poor, while just one per cent of Canadians indicated they thought the government’s investigation had been “very good.”

Capital Dispatch: Stay up to date on the latest news from Parliament Hill

This comes a week after Lt.-Gen. Wayne Eyre, acting chief of the defence staff, promised to create a safer environment within the military following allegations of sexual misconduct.

"We have to learn why previous approaches did not work and learn from that and incorporate those into our plan going forward," Eyre said during testimony before the House of Commons Status of Women Committee on March 23.

Former chief of the defence staff Gen. Jonathan Vance began the current program -- Operation Honour -- in 2015. Vance is under investigation for allegations of sexual misconduct that CTV News has not independently verified.


 

Colin Parkinson

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The thing about average is that there are just as many people below average as there are above average. Considering how long it takes to build a replacement from scratch, its not unusual to find that the system needs to find a place for them.

I'm a firm believer in the Peter Principle. Since the military is a hierarchy that thrives, on and rewards with, promotion it is no surprise that many folks end up being promoted to a level where their competence barely keeps up or doesn't measure up anymore. That's normal. There are places in the system where they can still usefully contribute.

What's abnormal is promoting folks beyond that level just because there is a position to fill and they're the next one on the promotion list because their current supervisor doesn't have the courage to mark them down to how they truly are.

🍻
I had one soldier that was literally a "loyal dog", not a bright dog, but if I gave him a task that was within his competence, it would get done and he would work late to help me as I treated him with respect. There are a lot of unglamorous tasks in the military and sometimes you need people who don't feel they are special and just want to be given a fair shake. You don't want an army that they are the majority, but you also don't want an army without them.
 

Bruce Monkhouse

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You mean shake up the " he/she is just a Corporal" mentality?

Definitely asking too much IMO.
 

mariomike

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I had one soldier that was literally a "loyal dog", not a bright dog, but if I gave him a task that was within his competence, it would get done and he would work late to help me as I treated him with respect. There are a lot of unglamorous tasks in the military and sometimes you need people who don't feel they are special and just want to be given a fair shake. You don't want an army that they are the majority, but you also don't want an army without them.
I've read, "An ounce of loyalty is worth a pound of cleverness."
 

Lumber

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I've read, "An ounce of loyalty is worth a pound of cleverness."

Here's a good reminder....

“It is comparatively simple to select the generals after a display of their military qualities on the battlefield. The difficulty is when we must choose them prior to employment in active operations. . . . The most important factor of all is character, which involves integrity, unselfish and devoted purpose, a sturdiness of bearing when everything goes wrong and all are critical, and a willingness to sacrifice self in the interest of the common good.”–George C. Marshall, 1944, writing to Miss Craig’s class in Roanoke, Virginia
I think one of the biggest problems with the navy is purely attrition. It's hard to pick the best candidate when there is such a rediculously small pool to choose from. Seriously go do an advanced search on the GAL and just put "Capt(N)" and/or "Cmdre" in the rank box. You'll find that across the rcn there are very few of either.
 

shawn5o

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Majority of Canadians not confident military can improve workplace culture: Nanos survey

Ben Cousins
CTVNews.ca Writer
Published Friday, April 2, 2021 10:04PM EDT

TORONTO -- A new survey suggests Canadians aren't very confident in the Canadian military's ability to change its workplace culture following reports of sexual misconduct and discrimination within the forces.

According to the latest survey from Nanos Research, just 13 per cent of Canadians are confident the Canadian Armed Forces can “change its workplace to be welcoming to everyone,” while 29 per cent are “somewhat confident” and 56 per cent are either not confident or somewhat not confident.

Additionally, 61.3 per cent of women involved in the survey were either not confident or somewhat not confident in the military’s ability to change its culture.

Canadians are also not very impressed with the Canadian government’s investigation into allegations of sexual misconduct and discrimination in the military, with 54 per cent of respondents indicating their perception of the investigations is either poor or very poor, while just one per cent of Canadians indicated they thought the government’s investigation had been “very good.”

Read the full article at

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My granddaughter asked me about the forces, wondering if she could join. In the past, I encouraged ppl to join up and learn a trade or make a career but told her now is not a good time. She seemed disappointed. I would love to see her join up but have doubts - ref above article
 
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